Fat Buzz Cut Hero Assaults Motorcyclist

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Here’s another example of someone who hadn’t harmed anyone being harmed because he “might.”

A motorcyclist riding faster than the law allows was pursued by a stereotypically bloated, buzzcut Oregon state cop (driving a taxpayer-funded Camaro muscle car) who rammed the biker when he came to a stop at a red light, then kicked him in the chest, MMA-style (the biker made no aggressive move to justify this) breaking his clavicle and fracturing a rib.

The good news is, an eight-member jury ruled that the porked-out porker violated the motorcyclist’s civil rights in the Aug. 3, 2012 incident, which was captured on video (below).

The video shows the motorcyclist coming to a stop before the cop rear-ends him, sending him flying to the ground. The buzzcut Hero cop is then seen exiting his vehicle with his gun drawn and pointing it at the stunned motorcyclist.

After the cyclist shakes himself off and makes his way to his feet, the footage shows the fat pig deliver a front kick to the biker’s upper chest. The biker is then seen slowly complying with commands to get on the ground at gunpoint and is handcuffed.

The motorcyclist claimed that he did not know that the unmarked car was a police vehicle or that it was pursuing him. He said his tight-fitting motorcycle helmet impeded his ability to hear at the time, and that he did not see the officer’s flashing lights – which were embedded in the Camaro’s grille – through his small rear-view mirror.

Watch the raw footage:

The video was played multiple times for the jury during the three-day trial, who determined that the Hero cop acted with negligence when his police car rear-ended Wilkens’ motorcycle, and that the kick constituted excessive force.

Justin Wilkens, the motorcyclist, was awarded more than $180,000 in total damages: $31,000 in economic damages for medical expenses and motorcycle repair bills; $100,000 in non­economic damages for his injuries and pain and suffering; and $50,000 in punitive damages.

In response to the verdict, the Oregon State Police said in a statement that they are “disappointed with the outcome and feel the actions of [the trooper] clearly did not violate established procedures or tactics.” In addition, they asserted that Edwards “should be shielded from the liability of civil damages.”

The buzzcut Hero conceded in court that Wilkens had begun to comply with his commands before he kicked him, but maintained that he was unable to stop because he “already had the muscles fired” in his leg.

The Hero cop also claimed that crashing into the motorcycle was an accident that possibly resulted from loss of braking power in his car. A brake expert testified however, that “brake fades” are rare in vehicles equipped with modern break systems like Edwards’ Camaro.

In the wake of the incident, Edwards received nothing more than a written reprimand for neglecting to report his use of force to supervisors and would latter be granted a promotion to Captain.

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13 COMMENTS

  1. “The video was played multiple times for the jury during the three-day trial, who determined that the Hero cop acted with negligence when his police car rear-ended Wilkens’ motorcycle, and that the kick constituted excessive force.”

    A fully informed jury may well have determined that the Hero cop was guilty of attempted murder when his police car rear-ended Wilkens’ motorcycle, and that the kick constituted felonious assault.

    A fully informed citizenry might then decide that the fatassed, buzzcut felon needed a public beatdown.

    I can dream, can’t I?

    • Hi Frederic,

      “The most dangerous thing he did that day was interacting with a cop.”

      Exactly.

      Think about most traffic enforcement. Victimless “crimes” – except, of course, for the fact that we are victimized (by cops) for having caused no harm….

  2. Notice how an individual working for Federal, State, or Local Government can be “theoretically” held civilly liable for acts way outside the boundaries, but the organization denies their acts, and without video, the individual would go “free”.

  3. I’m “disappointed with the outcome..” too, the fat s.o.b. should have been fired and done some jail time, and made to pay the fine out of his own pocket instead of the taxpayers of that jurisdiction. Hope I live to see the day a crowd forms around piggies behaving badly and beats the living shit out of them.

  4. that “brake fades” are rare in vehicles equipped with modern “break” systems like Edwards’ Camaro.

    “maintained that he was unable to stop because he “already had the muscles fired” in his leg.” He’s obviously not fit to drive if he can’t control his muscles, couldn’t stop the car, couldn’t stop his “fired muscles”. I wonder if his mouth was jerking open and shut like a cat near a bird it’s about to attack. He’s a danger to himself and others also if he can’t control that trigger finger when the muscles are already “fired”.

    The testimony of these POS are simply ludicrous so much of the time. gagg…puke….

  5. I’m disappointed that OSP considers that “the actions of [the trooper] clearly did not violate established procedures or tactics.”

    In addition, they asserted that Edwards “should be shielded from the liability of civil damages.”
    If troopers did not engage in inappropriate behavior, then they should not fear any liability from civil damages.

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