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Eric
06-25-2008, 04:23 PM
Hey Gail,

What was your best "get out of it" story with regard to a speeding ticket? How about telling us your about your favorite one?

gail
06-25-2008, 09:51 PM
Hey Gail,

What was your best "get out of it" story with regard to a speeding ticket? How about telling us your about your favorite one?


I really didn't 'get out of it,' I muddled through by fighting them. Won all but one. However, that one set me on the course to change the law.

Oh wait a minute I did get out of one: I had just moved to Tennessee, still had Utah licence plates on my car, when a cop pulls me over just outside of Friendsville, down by the Tennessee river. Sounds like a song doesn't it? Anyway, he pulls me over and asks me if I knew how fast I was going, and I said yes. Then, he asked me if I knew what the posted speed limit was, and again I said "yes." What is it he asked. "65" I replied. He started laughing and told me about 55. I had never heard of the National Maximum Speed Limit before then. That was 1989. He told me to watch my speed and let me go. I was dumbfounded, not that he let me go, but that there was a stupid federal speed limit.

misterdecibel
06-25-2008, 10:06 PM
Where were you when Nixon enacted the NMSL in 1974?

gail
06-25-2008, 10:23 PM
Where were you when Nixon enacted the NMSL in 1974?


I'm a blonde, need I say more?

Oh but I will. Until the NMSL pinched me, it just wasn't in my world of childrearing, church going, homemaking and kaffeeklatching. Life was different in those days. Most of the women I knew thought motherhood was a profession and enjoyed staying home with their children. The women that I knew who worked outside their homes weren't married, or didn't have children, or were self-centered. It amazing me how times have changed, and how news orientated everyone has become. I don't necessarily think all of this is for the better either.

I am glad that I have a computer and can talk with others to get the real lowdown on the news, as I don't trust the media to tell the truth. I do trust the media to exaggerate, twist, sensationalize and outright lie about what is happening in the world today.

I don't understand the obsession with entertainers personal lives either. I couldn't care less what they are doing or with who, they are overrated and overpaid.

DonTom
06-26-2008, 04:16 AM
"I'm a blonde, need I say more?"

Yep, because it would have been very hard to even find a dumb blond who didn't hear of the NMSL back in those days. In fact, it even worked for a while, just before they enforced the 55. Most people were trying out the 55 MPH even before the NMSL was in effect. However, by the time 55 MPH was law, cars were speeding up.

Back in those days, the NMSL was on the news everyday. If you listen to the radio, TV or read a newspaper, you would have heard or seen something about it. And many were talking about it. Seems you would have to be outside the country to not know about it.

The 55 MPH speed limit wasn't nearly as bad as the phony gasoline shortage, where everybody in this area had to wait all day in a gas station line. It created fights and everything else.

Back then, my dad had a vehicle with a very large gas tank and he filled it up. I was getting to work on a motorcycle (my BMW). My dad let me siphon gasoline out of his car to fill up my motorcycle (six gallons), so I would not have to wait in line all day. And I do mean all day (six hour wait was about average for a while).

All they had to do is take the gasoline from one gas station and split it up with the 35 other stations that were closed and then there would have been no lines. Even with an infinite amount of gasoline, lines will be long when 97% of the gas stations are closed because the gas companies would not sell them any gasoline.

-Don-

Eric
06-26-2008, 07:34 AM
Hey Gail,

What was your best "get out of it" story with regard to a speeding ticket? How about telling us your about your favorite one?


I really didn't 'get out of it,' I muddled through by fighting them. Won all but one. However, that one set me on the course to change the law.

Oh wait a minute I did get out of one: I had just moved to Tennessee, still had Utah licence plates on my car, when a cop pulls me over just outside of Friendsville, down by the Tennessee river. Sounds like a song doesn't it? Anyway, he pulls me over and asks me if I knew how fast I was going, and I said yes. Then, he asked me if I knew what the posted speed limit was, and again I said "yes." What is it he asked. "65" I replied. He started laughing and told me about 55. I had never heard of the National Maximum Speed Limit before then. That was 1989. He told me to watch my speed and let me go. I was dumbfounded, not that he let me go, but that there was a stupid federal speed limit.


That's all? ;)

I was hoping for a story on how you sank your teeth into them in court and would not let go....!

Eric
06-26-2008, 07:37 AM
"I'm a blonde, need I say more?"

Yep, because it would have been very hard to even find a dumb blond who didn't hear of the NMSL back in those days. In fact, it even worked for a while, just before they enforced the 55. Most people were trying out the 55 MPH even before the NMSL was in effect. However, by the time 55 MPH was law, cars were speeding up.

Back in those days, the NMSL was on the news everyday. If you listen to the radio, TV or read a newspaper, you would have heard or seen something about it. And many were talking about it. Seems you would have to be outside the country to not know about it.

The 55 MPH speed limit wasn't nearly as bad as the phony gasoline shortage, where everybody in this area had to wait all day in a gas station line. It created fights and everything else.

Back then, my dad had a vehicle with a very large gas tank and he filled it up. I was getting to work on a motorcycle (my BMW). My dad let me siphon gasoline out of his car to fill up my motorcycle (six gallons), so I would not have to wait in line all day. And I do mean all day (six hour wait was about average for a while).

All they had to do is take the gasoline from one gas station and split it up with the 35 other stations that were closed and then there would have been no lines. Even with an infinite amount of gasoline, lines will be long when 97% of the gas stations are closed because the gas companies would not sell them any gasoline.

-Don-


I'm glad I was too young to have experienced that... .

Egads.

But I do have some awful memories of the NMSL Era - including half a dozen tickets I got in college for "reckless driving" - which in those days you got for driving at the frightful, horrendously dangerous, child-imperiling speed of 76 mph....

gail
06-26-2008, 02:06 PM
"I'm a blonde, need I say more?"

Yep, because it would have been very hard to even find a dumb blond who didn't hear of the NMSL back in those days. In fact, it even worked for a while, just before they enforced the 55. Most people were trying out the 55 MPH even before the NMSL was in effect. However, by the time 55 MPH was law, cars were speeding up.

Back in those days, the NMSL was on the news everyday. If you listen to the radio, TV or read a newspaper, you would have heard or seen something about it. And many were talking about it. Seems you would have to be outside the country to not know about it.

The 55 MPH speed limit wasn't nearly as bad as the phony gasoline shortage, where everybody in this area had to wait all day in a gas station line. It created fights and everything else.

Back then, my dad had a vehicle with a very large gas tank and he filled it up. I was getting to work on a motorcycle (my BMW). My dad let me siphon gasoline out of his car to fill up my motorcycle (six gallons), so I would not have to wait in line all day. And I do mean all day (six hour wait was about average for a while).

All they had to do is take the gasoline from one gas station and split it up with the 35 other stations that were closed and then there would have been no lines. Even with an infinite amount of gasoline, lines will be long when 97% of the gas stations are closed because the gas companies would not sell them any gasoline.

-Don-


As to the gas shortage, being a dumb - attractive - blonde was in my favor. I never waited in a line, and I even got gas on my off days. ;D

Out of the country, eh? Well, I was living in a little dinky town called Colorado Springs. I did watch some TV, the important shows like Sonny and Cher. MASH, All in the Family. The main topic of conversation among my peers was birthing, breastfeeding, Bible study, and the SLOB sisters.

I did make my first across country trip - alone - in 1975. That was when I grew up and knew that I could do anything that I set my mind to do. It was hard though and I was scared. The further I drove and the more experiences that I had, the braver I became. I was scared to stop at rest areas, gas stations, restaurants, and motels. But I concurred it all. I am the great explorer. ;D

Besides what difference did it make that I didn't know about the NMSL, I couldn't have done anything about it before I did. And, maybe, just maybe if I had known all of those years I would have become so complacent that I would never have believed that I could get a repeal.

gail
06-26-2008, 02:07 PM
Hey Gail,

What was your best "get out of it" story with regard to a speeding ticket? How about telling us your about your favorite one?


I really didn't 'get out of it,' I muddled through by fighting them. Won all but one. However, that one set me on the course to change the law.

Oh wait a minute I did get out of one: I had just moved to Tennessee, still had Utah licence plates on my car, when a cop pulls me over just outside of Friendsville, down by the Tennessee river. Sounds like a song doesn't it? Anyway, he pulls me over and asks me if I knew how fast I was going, and I said yes. Then, he asked me if I knew what the posted speed limit was, and again I said "yes." What is it he asked. "65" I replied. He started laughing and told me about 55. I had never heard of the National Maximum Speed Limit before then. That was 1989. He told me to watch my speed and let me go. I was dumbfounded, not that he let me go, but that there was a stupid federal speed limit.


That's all? ;)

I was hoping for a story on how you sank your teeth into them in court and would not let go....!




That came later. LOL

gail
06-26-2008, 02:16 PM
Seven tickets in all. The first one was phony, but I had heard about "throwing yourself on the mercy of the court." Don't ever do that. Anyway, my mother took up the battle for me and wrote to the judge, explaining to him that I hadn't been driving at the time of the sighting. My husband and I changed drivers just before the road block. The judge dismissed charges. I was happy. :)

Second time I was driving and I just paid the ticket. Don't do that either. I never will.

Third time I was on a military base - that's a federal crime, you know, and the military person get called up on the carpet whether driving or not. I stood before a Federal Marshall, sort of exciting and scary at the same time. He was taking people alphabetically, and he was soooo strict. He didn't let anyone off. I was so nervous by the time I was called upon that I was in tears. I explained that the speed limit sign was for the school and the school wasn't in session. The MP said that the speed limit sign was for the hospital and I was speeding. The judge ruled that the speed limit wasn't clear and ruled in my favor. The only one of the day. Truth or dare.

More later.

DonTom
06-27-2008, 05:06 AM
"Out of the country, eh? Well, I was living in a little dinky town called Colorado Springs. "

I've been there many times in 1971. After Vietnam, I was stationed at Ft. Carson. Since you're a military brat, I assume that's why you lived there. Were you there in 1971 too?

-Don-

Eric
06-27-2008, 08:09 AM
"Seven tickets in all."

There was a time, back in my prime, when I got that many in a year!

During college, during the 55 era, I got nailed left and right six ways to Sunday. I did a lot of highway driving - and of course, I did not "drive 55." I typically ran 70-80. Today, you can do that and be reasonably sure you won't get a ticket if you're judicious and alert. Back then, it was High Risk.

The only upside was that these were the pre-reciprocity days - so when you got an out of state ticket, it did not follow you back home.

Usually.

DonTom
06-27-2008, 01:03 PM
"I typically ran 70-80. Today, you can do that and be reasonably sure you won't get a ticket if you're judicious and alert."

But what about getting caught doing 140 MPH? ;D

-Don-

Eric
06-27-2008, 01:17 PM
"I typically ran 70-80. Today, you can do that and be reasonably sure you won't get a ticket if you're judicious and alert."

But what about getting caught doing 140 MPH? ;D

-Don-


I never get caught when going that fast!

Seriously... when you're moving at that speed, it is very hard for the cop to even turn around in time. By the time he gets pointed in the right direction, you are gone.

I almost invariably get caught for BS stuff such as going 70-80 on the highway - when I'm just "cruising along."

gail
06-27-2008, 01:46 PM
"Out of the country, eh? Well, I was living in a little dinky town called Colorado Springs. "

I've been there many times in 1971. After Vietnam, I was stationed at Ft. Carson. Since you're a military brat, I assume that's why you lived there. Were you there in 1971 too?

-Don-


We arrived in August of 1971 and lived there until May 1985. It was a great, little town. I hear that it has grown considerally since I left. Ent AF was still open when we arrived, it is now the Olympic Headquarters now. After Ent closed we did most of our shopping at Pete Field, occasionally shopped at Ft. Carson. Fort Carson is where I got one of my speeding tickets. :'(

DonTom
06-27-2008, 03:44 PM
"We arrived in August of 1971 and lived there until May 1985. "


I was at Ft. Carson from mid-September 1970 until March 25, 1971. So we were not there at the same time.

-Don-

gail
06-30-2008, 11:09 PM
"We arrived in August of 1971 and lived there until May 1985. "


I was at Ft. Carson from mid-September 1970 until March 25, 1971. So we were not there at the same time.

-Don-


Like you ships passing in the night. Did I say that Ft. Carson was the place that I got my Federal ticket?