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Eric
08-08-2008, 08:07 AM
Ford is moving quickly to address driver demands for increased visibility with an industry-first innovation, the Blind Spot Mirror, pulling ahead the feature's introduction by one year to launch this fall as standard equipment on the 2009 Ford Edge.

"Ford is committed to delivering innovative features that provide a better driving experience for the customer," said Derrick Kuzak, Ford group vice president, Global Product Development. "The Blind Spot Mirror is the latest example of our strategy to move fast and to be industry leaders in enhancing the ownership experience."

Ford's Blind Sport Mirror answers customers' demands for better visibility as they change lanes or parallel park. This affordable technology will debut on the 2009 Edge later this year and eventually will be offered on several future Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles as standard equipment.

Blind Spot Mirror

The Blind Spot Mirror is a traditional side view mirror designed with a secondary convex spotter in the top outer corner, which provides a view of the driver's blind spot. When traffic enters the driver's blind spot on either side of the vehicle, it is visible in the secondary convex mirror, alerting the driver of potential danger.

Ford's push to develop the Blind Spot Mirror and migrate it across its lineup comes as a result of careful customer research, said Kelly Kohlstrand with Ford's Advanced Product Marketing and Technology Planning team.

"We're committed to offering new features that address unmet customer needs," Kohlstrand said. "Customers told us that visibility is important to them and that they specifically desired a more effective outside rearview mirror."

Early drive clinics conducted by Ford show that the Blind Spot Mirror is a feature that customers want and value. Nearly 76 percent of focus group clinic participants said the mirror improved their confidence while driving. In addition, the participants said the learning curve or adjustment to the using the Blind Spot Mirror was minimal.

Ford's Blind Spot Mirror provides a more seamless solution than present aftermarket offerings, as it uses one continuous glass surface and is robust to the elements. The factory-installed spotter mirror is specifically designed for the vehicle - car or truck - it provides an optimized field of view.

chiph
08-08-2008, 10:09 AM
In other news, sales of stick-on mirrors at Pep-Boys are down.
:)

Really, people just need to be taught how to correctly adjust their mirrors.

Driver's side: Lean your head against the glass, adjust mirror until you can see the side of the car.
Passenger's side: Lean your head over the handbrake, adjust mirror until you can see the side of the car.

It'll take a couple of weeks to get used to the 'new' way of doing it, but you'll find the blind spot is significantly reduced or eliminated.

Chip H.

Ken
08-08-2008, 10:49 AM
Ford is moving quickly to address driver demands for increased visibility with an industry-first innovation, the Blind Spot Mirror, pulling ahead the feature's introduction by one year to launch this fall as standard equipment on the 2009 Ford Edge.

"Ford is committed to delivering innovative features that provide a better driving experience for the customer," said Derrick Kuzak, Ford group vice president, Global Product Development. "The Blind Spot Mirror is the latest example of our strategy to move fast and to be industry leaders in enhancing the ownership experience."

Ford's Blind Sport Mirror answers customers' demands for better visibility as they change lanes or parallel park. This affordable technology will debut on the 2009 Edge later this year and eventually will be offered on several future Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles as standard equipment.

Blind Spot Mirror

The Blind Spot Mirror is a traditional side view mirror designed with a secondary convex spotter in the top outer corner, which provides a view of the driver's blind spot. When traffic enters the driver's blind spot on either side of the vehicle, it is visible in the secondary convex mirror, alerting the driver of potential danger.

Ford's push to develop the Blind Spot Mirror and migrate it across its lineup comes as a result of careful customer research, said Kelly Kohlstrand with Ford's Advanced Product Marketing and Technology Planning team.

"We're committed to offering new features that address unmet customer needs," Kohlstrand said. "Customers told us that visibility is important to them and that they specifically desired a more effective outside rearview mirror."

Early drive clinics conducted by Ford show that the Blind Spot Mirror is a feature that customers want and value. Nearly 76 percent of focus group clinic participants said the mirror improved their confidence while driving. In addition, the participants said the learning curve or adjustment to the using the Blind Spot Mirror was minimal.

Ford's Blind Spot Mirror provides a more seamless solution than present aftermarket offerings, as it uses one continuous glass surface and is robust to the elements. The factory-installed spotter mirror is specifically designed for the vehicle - car or truck - it provides an optimized field of view.


I think Ford are about thirty five years behind the times. The Zanetti twin focus 'blind spot eliminator' mirror was around when I was in my thirties. John Zanetti, whose father invented the mirror was a good friend and I helped him assemble many mirrors for both private cars and HGVs. He actually started his UK manufacture in the shed in my garden. Some years later he either sold the manufacturing rights, or merged with - if memory serves me correctly - Wingard and the mirror was manufactured under the 'Zanetti- Wingard' banner. I used John's mirrors on all my cars for many years, on our English roads they were invaluable. The larger HGV mirrors were used by thousands of heavy goods vehicle drivers and gave much improved driver vision (on both nearside and offside) and safety.

Ken.

J. ZIMM
08-31-2008, 11:01 PM
:) No kidding. How about lowering the backend of the vehicle three to four feet, and putting in a window? It worked on a lot of the older cars. Untill some one in a TR-3 pulled up along side...YIKES!!! :o