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Valentine One Radar Detector

jdm124
09-04-2008, 09:04 PM
Can anyone recommend a good gauge? I don't moind spending a few bucks if it is accurate and consistant. It should have a bleed valve, too.

Right now I have one on the air pump hose and a separate dial type - the separate gauge shows 35 when the pump gauge shows 38+. I tend to trust the separate gauge.

DonTom
09-04-2008, 10:10 PM
"Can anyone recommend a good gauge? "

Yes. I like my several made by Brookstone much more than any others. But you will probably want the one with the long hose, not the one shown below. They have them max out at 60 psi as well as 100 psi. There might be other models too, but all work very well and are very accurate .

I am not sure if all the models are still available. I have one I am looking at now that's a BrookStone 100 PSI with a 15" hose. They are the best I have found, and are cheap. They also used to sell a rubber boot to fit them in, to make them drop proof. All mine have the boots. I own several of them. The only ones I really trust.

All of mine are about 15 to 20 years old, so I am not sure how much they have changed, if any. They look the same by the picture.


http://www.brookstone.com/sl/product/2638-precision-tire-gauge-bleeder-valve.html (http://www.brookstone.com/sl/product/2638-precision-tire-gauge-bleeder-valve.html)

-Don-

jdm124
09-04-2008, 10:48 PM
Don, thanks, I'll take a look.

chiph
09-05-2008, 12:29 PM
The cheap electronic ones are surprisingly accurate. Much more so than the 'stick' kind. The dial gauges are somewhere in between.

Chip H.

jdm124
09-05-2008, 02:43 PM
The cheap electronic ones are surprisingly accurate. Much more so than the 'stick' kind. The dial gauges are somewhere in between.

Chip H.



The only thing the stick gauges have going for them is size. I gave up on the electronic cheapos because they are too hard to read unless in bright light.

Here is a site with a lot of gauge information and options - I can't speak to the quality of the product.

http://www.getagauge.com/index.cfm

DonTom
09-06-2008, 02:36 AM
"The cheap electronic ones are surprisingly accurate. Much more so than the 'stick' kind. The dial gauges are somewhere in between."

I have both types and don't agree. What do you use for a standard to compare with? I think of the digital ones as being much like a "stick" type but with an analog to digital converter. It might even give you a PSI reading in tenths, but that doesn't prove accuracy.

-Don-

Ken
09-06-2008, 07:59 AM
"The cheap electronic ones are surprisingly accurate. Much more so than the 'stick' kind. The dial gauges are somewhere in between."

I have both types and don't agree. What do you use for a standard to compare with? I think of the digital ones as being much like a "stick" type but with an analog to digital converter. It might even give you a PSI reading in tenths, but that doesn't prove accuracy.

-Don-


Not quite, Don.

Inside the tube that makes up the body of the 'stick' pressure gauge, there is a small, tight-sealing piston much like the piston inside a bicycle pump. The inside of the tube is polished smooth. The piston is made of soft rubber so it seals nicely against the tube, and the inside of the tube is lubricated with a light oil to improve the seal. The piston is at the 'input' end of the tube and there is a stop at the other end. A spring runs the length of the tube between the piston and the stop, and this compressed spring pushes the piston away from the air input toward the far end of the tube. As it moves the piston pushes a calibrated rod which slides out through the stop at the far end of the tube. When the pressure is removed the spring returns the piston to its 'start' position but leaves the calibrated rod behind. The pressure is read off the calibrated rod. This type of gauge is affected by wear on the piston, aging of the spring, the ingress of any dust and/or moisture entering through the input valve.

The digital (electronic) type rely on a small, solid state pressure sensor that in a good quality unit, once calibrated to the electronic circuitry, should not drift measurably. (The gauge has a small memory chip that carries the calibration table) The accuracy depends on the degree of accuracy of the initial calibration, the very small amount of acceptable drift in the electronics and last, but most certainly not least, in the charge state of the inbuilt battery.

Ken.

misterdecibel
09-06-2008, 02:27 PM
There was a Consomer Reports test in the mid-1990s, a few specific models of NAPA stick gauges were top-rated for accuracy.

DonTom
09-07-2008, 06:27 AM
"The digital (electronic) type rely on a small, solid state pressure sensor that in a good quality unit, "

I might have low quality units. IIRC, mine had the Radio Shack name on them. They are at my other home, so I am not sure.

I think perhaps we can get accurate and inaccurate gauges in any style. What's more important is the quality, not the style.

IMO, the BrookStone gauges cannot be beat.

Of course, there are other things to consider too. Many styles won't fit some motorcycles, for an example. I have the best luck with the ones that come with a hose.

-Don-

swamprat
09-07-2008, 08:44 AM
This is the one I own. Its made in the USA.

http://www.getagauge.com/USAProducts.cfm

DonTom
12-07-2008, 01:29 AM
I just purchased four new digital tire gauges at $40.00 each. (http://www.amazon.com/Accutire-MS-5510B-Racing-Tire-Gauge/dp/B000BNS7Y2)Here, I am going to compare them to my BrookStone Precision Tire Gauge (http://www.brookstone.com/shop/product.asp?product_code=396168&cm_ven=Compare&cm_cat=Mercent&cm_ite=datafeed&cm_pla=GoogleBase&mr:trackingCode=8194C27E-2DC3-DD11-8F1F-0019B9C2BEFD&mr:referralID=NA) that costs less than one third the price.

By far, I like the cheaper Brookstone analog gauge the best. Mine is like the one shown above, except for mine has a long hose on it, which is the exact same length as the digital gauge shown above. Here are the reasons I like my old analog gauge the best:

1. The MS-5510B digital tire gauge has a clip at the hose which gets in the way of the hubcaps when short valve stems are used. I had to remove the hubcaps from my 97 Sebring to use this gauge. Hubcaps were not in the way at all with the Bookstone gauge.

2. Unlike my analog gauge, the MS-5510B drops from one to three PSI right when it's released from the tire. All four of them do this. Why hold the reading if the held reading is not accurate?

3. My analog gauge measured 33.0 psi, connected and would hold it when disconnected. It will probably hold this reading for hours if not longer, if I don't release the pressure in it. On the same tire, the MS-5510B reads 32.9 (0.1 psi less, or basiclly the same readings) psi. When I released it, it went to 29.8 psi. Dropped more than 3 psi! And the drop changes each time used, from one PSI to more three, and slowly drops down to even lower. All four of them do this.

4. All instructions were followed with the MS-5510B, including calibration. The analog needs no calibration.

I wish I did not buy these four gauges, but they do work, so I will keep them. I am the type that rarely returns anything, but I wish I purchased more of my Brookstones instead. I would have, if I could still find them with the long hose.

The MS-5510B has an alalog scale around it and it lights up nicely. The only good things I found when compared to my old cheap Brookstone gauge.

-Don-

DonTom
12-11-2008, 10:11 AM
"This is the one I own. Its made in the USA."

I just purchased six of them, two 90 degree, two straight and two swivel as shown below. I have compared them to both my more expensive digital (made in China) gauges as well as my Brookstone ( I don't know where made) gauges.

I like your gauge the best of all. I now have a new favorite. It gives the same readings as my other two (within a few tenth of a PSI or so) but has more chuck selections, holds the air fine (unlike the digital) and are of good quality. The only advantage over my Brookstone gauge is the more chuck selections , but I see no disadvantage which makes yours my new favorite.

My least favorite are the made in China digitals. They won't hold the reading (drop about three psi when disconnected and keep on dropping), require three batteries and the chuck clip sometimes gets in the way. They claim to be the most accurate gauge availible, it reads out tenths of a psi, but who needs that? I would say it's the least accurate because it won't hold the reading, losing a different amount of PSI each time disconnected unlike the analogs.


-Don-


Accu-GageŽ H... Series Tire Gauges http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/HseriesGauge.gif
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/space.gif
Flexible hose between durable steel case gauge and chuck. Needle holds pressure reading until released. Pushbutton valve bleeds air to desired tire pressure.
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/space.gif
Tire gauge available with straight, swivel angle or right angle chuck. Right angle is great for motorcycles!
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/space.gif
15 *, 30, 60, 100, or 160 max. psi tire gauge
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/space.gif
*Add $2 to prices shown for 15psi gauge This tire gauge is assembled and tested in the USA
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/usa.gif (http://www.getagauge.com/USAInfo.cfm)
http://www.getagauge.com/graphics/space.gif Select chuck type:
Straight, 11" hose (#H...X) $13.00 +S/H
Swivel angle, 11" hose (#H...XA) (shown) $14.50 +S/H
Right angle, 11" hose (pic) (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:newWindow%28%27http://www.getagauge.com/gauges/ra60x.htm%27%29) (#RA...X) $14.50 +S/H
Dual foot, 6" hose (pic) (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:newWindow%28%27http://www.getagauge.com/gauges/df60x.jpg%27%29) (#DF...X) $14.50 +S/H