PDA

View Full Version : Honda Gone Swimming


Valentine One Radar Detector

Quackers
04-06-2009, 08:22 PM
Hi Folks,

Sorry I've been hiding again. My sister has a Honda Accord. I think around a 2005 or so model. While they were out of the country, the water came up and flooded out her engine compartment. It doesn't appear that the whole car got sunk and the inside isn't smelling really funky from mold (this was from the storms of the past 2 weeks). However, the car won't start. Her husband replaced the battery, but that didn't work. So, what could be soaked that could be easily checked out without taking it to the shop? They had moved both vehicles to higher ground before they left (3 months ago), but evidently it wasn't high enough! Thanks gang!

duck

chiph
04-06-2009, 10:10 PM
My advice: See if you can make an insurance claim. If not, get it running with the intent of selling it to someone who won't come back & complain about a moldy smell. A flooded car is as bad as one that caught fire -- it'll have all sorts of weird problems the rest of it's life, even if repaired.

I would:
- Change the oil (just because)
- Change the transmission fluid (the transmission has a breather tube and water could have gotten into there)
- You may not need to change the coolant, as the radiator cap should have kept the water out of the cooling system, but think about it.
- Change the brake and/or clutch fluid (it absorbs water from the air in normal conditions, I hate to think about what it looks like now)
- Remove the sparkplugs and make sure water didn't get into the cylinders.

Check the under-hood fuseboxes to see if water got in there (and may still be in there). There is a main fusebox with a large (120+ amp) fuse that runs everything, and there may be an auxillary fusebox for stuff like the ABS system.

How far up in the interior did the water get? Did it get high enough to short out the engine computer? (usually located down in the passenger's kick-panel area)

What happens when you turn the key to position I ? Do you get any lights on the dash? Does the radio play?

What happens when you turn the key to position II ? Do you hear the fuel pump come on?

What happens when you turn the key to position III ? Does the starter run and the engine turn over? Does it sound like it's turning at the normal speed?

Chip H.

Quackers
04-06-2009, 11:00 PM
From what they say. No lights, no sound, no power. Just dead.

DonTom
04-07-2009, 12:22 AM
From what they say. No lights, no sound, no power. Just dead.

If everything is totally dead, get a voltmeter out and check the voltage everywhere the battery cables go. It could be almost anything anywhere, so troubleshoot any simple circuit that is not working and you should find what's causing the problem.

IOW, forget the fact that everything is dead. Just check one circuit such as why the lights will not come on or why it will not start and stick with it. When you find that one problem, you will most likely fix them all.


-Don- SSF, CA

Eric
04-07-2009, 06:17 AM
Hi Folks,

Sorry I've been hiding again. My sister has a Honda Accord. I think around a 2005 or so model. While they were out of the country, the water came up and flooded out her engine compartment. It doesn't appear that the whole car got sunk and the inside isn't smelling really funky from mold (this was from the storms of the past 2 weeks). However, the car won't start. Her husband replaced the battery, but that didn't work. So, what could be soaked that could be easily checked out without taking it to the shop? They had moved both vehicles to higher ground before they left (3 months ago), but evidently it wasn't high enough! Thanks gang!

duck

I agree with Chip.

And, in all likelihood, the problems are going to be extensive. It doesn't require a complete immersion to the roof to ruin the car. All it takes is water high enough and long enough to get into areas it was never intended to get into.

The ECM (computer) and wiring are just "for openers."

Call the insurance co. and file a claim. My bet is the car's totaled (not economically fixable) from flood damage.

Quackers
04-07-2009, 08:00 PM
Say bye bye Honda.

DonTom
04-07-2009, 10:32 PM
I agree with Chip.

The ECM (computer) and wiring are just "for openers."

Call the insurance co. and file a claim. My bet is the car's totaled (not economically fixable) from flood damage.

Yeah, it really depends on where the water got into. But having only "the engine compartment" filled up with water might not be as bad as it sounds. The ECM is rarely in the engine compartment (too much heat). It's usually up nice and high in the dash.

This happens with boats quite often. It often happens from outside storage. Many people forget to remove the drain plug and a few months later after winter storage, they find the engine under water. And I mean automotive engines in boats such as Chevy, Ford, Volvo, etc. (inboard engine with outdrive, etc). It is quite common and I have yet to hear of an engine or anything expensive (in boats) that was destroyed by such rain water, after just a little work to solve the obvious problems caused by the water. However, it always destroys the battery, if not right away, it will only last a month or so after being previously under water. They corrode inside after being under water.

My replay was in case the car's insurance will not cover such a flood and your forced to fix it yourself. It might not be as hopeless as you might think. A good start if everything is really totally dead is to troubleshoot a simple circuit that is not working at all.


-Don- SSF, CA

grouch
04-07-2009, 10:47 PM
Hi Folks,

Sorry I've been hiding again. My sister has a Honda Accord. I think around a 2005 or so model. While they were out of the country, the water came up and flooded out her engine compartment. It doesn't appear that the whole car got sunk and the inside isn't smelling really funky from mold (this was from the storms of the past 2 weeks). However, the car won't start. Her husband replaced the battery, but that didn't work. So, what could be soaked that could be easily checked out without taking it to the shop? They had moved both vehicles to higher ground before they left (3 months ago), but evidently it wasn't high enough! Thanks gang!

duck



If it was the engine under water, the rest of the car got some too. I used to run a salvage yard. Water cars can be all sorts of trouble. Pre-computer, you could drain all the fluids, rinse the body and scrub the interior and you had a decent car. I had one guy who ran well over 80K a year and by the time the body would start to rust from inside, he had worn the rest of the car out.

However, now, with computers, you have microvolts and the smallest amount of corrosion can freak the computer out. The current problem is just a foretaste of things to come. To keep this car going, you will have to clean each and every computer connection and make sure there isn't any rust. With no power at all, I can think of several places the problem could be. Starter, ignition switch, bulkhead connector and so on. This is what comprehensive insurance is for.

Ken
04-08-2009, 07:06 AM
Hi Folks,

Sorry I've been hiding again. My sister has a Honda Accord. I think around a 2005 or so model. While they were out of the country, the water came up and flooded out her engine compartment. It doesn't appear that the whole car got sunk and the inside isn't smelling really funky from mold (this was from the storms of the past 2 weeks). However, the car won't start. Her husband replaced the battery, but that didn't work. So, what could be soaked that could be easily checked out without taking it to the shop? They had moved both vehicles to higher ground before they left (3 months ago), but evidently it wasn't high enough! Thanks gang!

duck

If everything is dead then try these simple checks. (Assuming vehicle is NEGATIVE EARTH.) Check for volts between the battery positive terminal and the engine block. If there are no volts, connect a jumper lead between the battery negative terminal and the engine block, making sure there is a good connection and try again. If there are still no volts, check that the earth bonding strip between chassis and engine is sound, remove the strip, clean all contact areas thoroughly and reconnect. Check again for volts between the battery positive terminal and the engine block. If volts are present, but there is still no power to the rest of the car, move up the battery positive lead to the next junction and check from the other side of the junction to the engine block. At some point the volts will disappear - this could be the main problem area, but not necessarily the only one.

Ken.

Quackers
04-08-2009, 11:09 PM
She said they were waiting to get it towed to a repair place, but they're thinking it's probably totaled. I saw a picture of it in the water and I'm pretty sure it got the computer. Seems like it caught quite a number of folks there unawares. Definition of a flash flooding. I'd try to talk her into a Hyundai, but she is a Honda fan, so I doubt that will happen.

Eric
04-09-2009, 06:26 AM
She said they were waiting to get it towed to a repair place, but they're thinking it's probably totaled. I saw a picture of it in the water and I'm pretty sure it got the computer. Seems like it caught quite a number of folks there unawares. Definition of a flash flooding. I'd try to talk her into a Hyundai, but she is a Honda fan, so I doubt that will happen.

I hope it goes ok and they give her fair value for the car. One of the worst things about a situation such as this is you sometimes end up with far less than the replacement value of the car that was ruined.