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Eric
08-22-2009, 08:44 AM
This car is rolling proof of the adage: “Nothing bad will happen to the person who owns a French car . . . because it already has.”

The Le Car—also known as the Renault 5 in Europe—was a sad little box with over-small tires and a rear-end that begged to be kicked. Although it was conceived as a car that would “one-up” other small cars of the period such as the British Mini Cooper and even the Fiat 127, the Le Car as produced could have attended the same low-self-esteem support group as the Yugo.

It was launched in 1972 with the slogan, “Hello, I’m the Renault 5, in town and on the road. . . . They also call me Supercar”—an audacious claim given the micro-displacement 850-cc, 36-horsepower engine that powered the original. It had roughly half the horsepower of a Chevette or Pinto.

You’d need plenty of time to get your croissants in this one.

Later models were supplied with a noxious 1.6-liter diesel that smelled worse than the car looked. A later high-performance turbo model complete with bulging pontoon fenders at least made up for the ridiculous appearance by making tracks when you floored it. This version was actually quite successful on the track.

The Le Car sold through 1985 in the United States—1995 in Europe—and actually sold fairly well. Some three million were built, all told. Luckily, only a few remain roadworthy—and they’re easy enough to catch and smash, if you come across a survivor.

As for parent company Renault, the French automaker formally abandoned the U.S. market in 1987 after selling the carcass of former partner in crime American Motors Corp. to Chrysler for $2 billion. However, Renault still has a bunion-covered toe in the North American market. Though few outside the car industry know it, Renault is partnered with highly successful Japanese automaker Nissan and may one day attempt to sneak some of its own cars back into the U.S. under the Nissan nameplate.

For more, see: http://www.amazon.com/Automotive-Atr...5114803#reader

misterdecibel
08-22-2009, 09:26 PM
Nissan Versa is built on the Renault Clio platform.

misterdecibel
08-22-2009, 09:33 PM
This car is rolling proof of the adage: “Nothing bad will happen to the person who owns a French car . . . because it already has.”

The Le Car—also known as the Renault 5 in Europe—was a sad little box with over-small tires and a rear-end that begged to be kicked. Although it was conceived as a car that would “one-up” other small cars of the period such as the British Mini Cooper and even the Fiat 127, the Le Car as produced could have attended the same low-self-esteem support group as the Yugo.

It was launched in 1972 with the slogan, “Hello, I’m the Renault 5, in town and on the road. . . . They also call me Supercar”—an audacious claim given the micro-displacement 850-cc, 36-horsepower engine that powered the original. It had roughly half the horsepower of a Chevette or Pinto.

You’d need plenty of time to get your croissants in this one.

Later models were supplied with a noxious 1.6-liter diesel that smelled worse than the car looked. A later high-performance turbo model complete with bulging pontoon fenders at least made up for the ridiculous appearance by making tracks when you floored it. This version was actually quite successful on the track.

The Le Car sold through 1985 in the United States—1995 in Europe—and actually sold fairly well. Some three million were built, all told. Luckily, only a few remain roadworthy—and they’re easy enough to catch and smash, if you come across a survivor.

As for parent company Renault, the French automaker formally abandoned the U.S. market in 1987 after selling the carcass of former partner in crime American Motors Corp. to Chrysler for $2 billion. However, Renault still has a bunion-covered toe in the North American market. Though few outside the car industry know it, Renault is partnered with highly successful Japanese automaker Nissan and may one day attempt to sneak some of its own cars back into the U.S. under the Nissan nameplate.

For more, see: http://www.amazon.com/Automotive-Atr...5114803#reader

Interesting that you bring up two versions, the 850cc and the 1.6 diesel, that were never sold in the USA...

I don't think they started bringing the Renault 5 to the US until about 1976 or so. They were originally going to call it "The Frog" to compete with VW's Rabbit, but at the last minute decided that would be like calling a Japanese car "The Nip" and changed it to the Franglais "Le Car". However the first US advertising still featured a singing and dancing cartoon frog, reminiscent of the famous Warner Brothers frog.

The R5 was mostly just a new body on the old R4 platform and drivetrain, which dated back to 1962.

The biggest problems with this car were with its adaptations to US smog regulations, Euro customers didn't seem to have nearly so many problems with them. An R5 was actually a fairly endearing car to drive, when everything was working.