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swamprat
02-05-2010, 03:51 PM
The latest lie comes from the labor department. The unemployment rate has miraculously dropped to 9.7 percent. Obama and his administration are frigging liars.

Mase
02-06-2010, 01:55 PM
Maybe they are counting all the part-time census snoops they have hired.

swamprat
02-07-2010, 02:19 PM
Saturday, 06 Feb 2010 03:09 PM

Many jobless people have reached a conclusion that captures the depth of the unemployment crisis: Looking for a job is a waste of time.
The economy is growing. Yet it's creating few jobs. That's why in the past eight months, 1.8 million people without jobs left the labor market. Many had grown so frustrated by their failure to find a job that they threw up their hands and quit looking for one.
And it's why Barbara Bishop sat down at her kitchen table in suburban Atlanta last month and joined their ranks. Her decision came seven months after she quit a PR job that seemed about to be axed. Sending out resumes got her nowhere. So Bishop made a list of her skills and decided to launch her own business.
"I don't want to look any more," she said of the job hunt. "It's become very discouraging."
The nation's unemployment rate is 9.7 percent. But so many jobless people have quit looking that if they're combined with the number of part-time workers who'd prefer to work full time, the so-called "underemployment" rate is 16.5 percent.
Their outsize numbers show that even though the economy is growing, the job market is stagnant. Employers remain reluctant to hire.
The exodus did halt in January, when a net total of 111,000 people re-entered the job market. But 661,000 had left in December. And the overall trend since spring has been people leaving the work force.
"It's very unusual," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com. "At this point in the business cycle, we should be seeing some sort of labor force growth. Layoffs have abated, but there really has been no pickup in hiring."
Job creation was stronger early in previous recoveries. And jobless people responded by streaming back into the labor force. Even before the 1990-1991 and 2001 recessions ended, for instance, more people entered than left the job market, according to an analysis by Moody's Economy.com. The work force did shrink after the severe 1981-1982 recession ended — but not as severely as it has this time, the analysis shows.
Some workers are concluding it's more practical to return to school, start a business or care at home for their kids until the job market improves. In some cases, it even makes financial sense to stop looking for work.
Jennifer McDonald, for example, decided she could help her family more by staying home than by hunting for jobs that don't seem to exist near her home in Elizabethtown, Pa. Laid off as a receptionist a year ago, McDonald spent months searching for work as a receptionist or store clerk.
She and her husband ultimately decided that with two kids, her staying at home made more sense: It would save roughly $300 a week on childcare, along with gas money and time shuttling the kids. The savings would help stretch her husband's income from an auto-body shop.
Besides, there were no jobs anyway.
"If you're just sitting there working on the computer all day, not getting paid to do it, it's not very profitable," she said.
Those leaving the work force have been beaten down by the competition for few jobs. A record 6.4 unemployed Americans, on average, are vying for each job opening, according to the most recent Labor Department data. That's up from 1.7 jobless people per opening in December 2007, when the recession began. And a record 6.3 million people have been jobless for at least six months.
Even if the economy continues growing this year, it won't likely recover many of the 8.4 million net jobs that vanished in the recession. Economists say the nation would be fortunate to get back 1.5 million of those jobs this year.
Part of the problem is that outsized growth in the real estate and construction industries disappeared when the housing bubble burst. Many of those jobs are gone for good.
Construction of homes, for example, could jump 30 percent this year to an annual rate of 715,000, said John Lonski, chief economist of Moody's Capital Markets Research Group. But the industry won't be rehiring many who lost jobs after 2007. That year, there were 1.3 million housing starts.
The economy would have to grow at an average rate of 5 percent for all of 2010 just to lower the average jobless rate for the year by 1 percentage point. Yet most analysts think the economy will grow 2.5 percent or less for the year.
That leaves workers hunting for jobs the economy won't likely create for months or even years.
As head of the Go! Network group in St. Louis, Chuck Aranda has seen how the slog of job hunting wears people down. His networking group offers seminars and breakfast meetings to get frustrated job-hunters out of the house.
"I think there are people who are doing this alone," Aranda said. "They're in their basements, they're on the Internet. And they're getting disconnected. They lose hope."
At some point, the exodus will reverse. Zandi thinks many will return by the second half of the year, once it appears employers have ramped up hiring.
Others will start looking again when their jobless benefits expire. Workers receive 26 weeks of regular unemployment benefits, plus up to 73 more weeks of extended aid depending on their state's unemployment rate.
Kelley Bryan is hoping to re-enter the job market next year, retrained for a new career. She was laid off in February after more than 20 years as a secretary. Most recently, she worked at a public TV station.
Bryan spent three frustrating months looking for a similar job near her suburban St. Louis home. Last spring, she decided to return to school. She landed a federal Pell Grant and enrolled at the L'Ecole Culinaire chef training school.
At 46, Bryan was surprised to find herself learning to make soup stocks and creme brulee with former autoworkers and other 40-somethings. They, too, are changing careers after losing jobs.
Classes start before dawn. Bryan has gone from wearing business suits and makeup to a chef's garb with dish-soaked hands. The stresses of student life are slight next to the drain of looking constantly for a job, she says.
Yet for many like Bryan, the struggle may not end once the job market improves. As more Americans re-enter the work force, Zandi says competition will tighten.
Yes, more jobs will be created. But a greater number of people will likely compete for them. That's why Zandi thinks the unemployment rate could creep up above 10 percent.
"Even if the job market gains some traction this year, unemployment is going to rise," he said.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

dBrong
02-08-2010, 08:33 PM
The latest lie comes from the labor department. The unemployment rate has miraculously dropped to 9.7 percent. Obama and his administration are frigging liars.

I've been a self employed Software developer for 25 yrs, and for 10 yrs before that for DoD software vendors. A total of 35 yrs experienc and two degrees. For the last 18 months, I've received no offers, and have received numerous rejection letters stating: "You have impressive creditentals" ... however ... "We have found another canidate that is a better fit".

What the hell is fit?

I think it's several fold: Age, expected wage, believing a younger person will not threaten their authority, or know more than they do.

It really pisses me off to hear Obama say "We need more money for education". Here I am two technical degrees, 35 yrs exp, and no contracts or jobs. What the hell does the US need more educated people for?

I wish this country would collapse, get it over with, and get back on the right track.

swamprat
02-08-2010, 10:20 PM
I've been a self employed Software developer for 25 yrs, and for 10 yrs before that for DoD software vendors. A total of 35 yrs experienc and two degrees. For the last 18 months, I've received no offers, and have received numerous rejection letters stating: "You have impressive creditentals" ... however ... "We have found another canidate that is a better fit".

What the hell is fit?

I think it's several fold: Age, expected wage, believing a younger person will not threaten their authority, or know more than they do.

It really pisses me off to hear Obama say "We need more money for education". Here I am two technical degrees, 35 yrs exp, and no contracts or jobs. What the hell does the US need more educated people for?

I wish this country would collapse, get it over with, and get back on the right track.

You got that right. If I were you, take one of your degrees and lop about 10 years of experience off your resume. Maybe that will make a difference.

I have about 20 years in this fight and am about sick and tired of it. I am sick of seeing job descriptions that expect everything under the sun that I don't have. When I do get a job, of course, I will have really no opportunity to learn new skills on the job. You have "to hit the ground running" and be a "self starter." Ugh.

I should never have gone into this field. It has been one mistake after another.

I had a converstation with a friend who has been out of work for almost 2 years. He was talking about selling crap at the flea market. I can't believe that after 20+ years of working, I'm talking about going to the flea market, which is a glorified junk sale.

I'm ready to check out. Beam me up!

dBrong
02-09-2010, 12:28 AM
I had a converstation with a friend who has been out of work for almost 2 years. He was talking about selling crap at the flea market. I can't believe that after 20+ years of working, I'm talking about going to the flea market, which is a glorified junk sale.

I'm ready to check out. Beam me up!

Obama has less acknowledgement of this problem, than trying the terrorists in federal courts. He's happy to 'save jobs'. Saving jobs is another code word for: we'll pay teachers and SEIU, to keep the government entitlement system running. What does Obama think - all us unemployed folks are gonna build highways, bridges, and train beds??

Don't let them tell you your cover letter isn't good enough. Don't let them tell you your resume isn't good enough. It's a scam, that put's the blame on the unemployed person. They are really looking for wage slaves. Warm bodies, who don't have an opinion, are easily bullied, and work cheap.

I've been working since I'm 15, that's 45 yrs. Always been employed. Now I can't get a job / contract. It's not me, it's not you, it's the horrible mess our country has become.

Eric
02-09-2010, 06:24 AM
You got that right. If I were you, take one of your degrees and lop about 10 years of experience off your resume. Maybe that will make a difference.

I have about 20 years in this fight and am about sick and tired of it. I am sick of seeing job descriptions that expect everything under the sun that I don't have. When I do get a job, of course, I will have really no opportunity to learn new skills on the job. You have "to hit the ground running" and be a "self starter." Ugh.

I should never have gone into this field. It has been one mistake after another.

I had a converstation with a friend who has been out of work for almost 2 years. He was talking about selling crap at the flea market. I can't believe that after 20+ years of working, I'm talking about going to the flea market, which is a glorified junk sale.

I'm ready to check out. Beam me up!

In my field - publishing - I have seen the following take place:

At newspapers, you used to have reporters and editors, who handled the writing and content - and a production side that handled physically producing the paper.

When I entered the field in the late 1980s, just out of college, there were still "print shops" - whole departments filled with typesetters and associated people, who "dummied up" the pages, which eventually became the paper you held in your hand the next day.

The came a process called Pagination, which eliminated the print shop - and all those jobs with it. Now computers were used to design each page of the paper.

And guess what?

No new people were hired to perform this function. Instead, reporters and editors became more "productive" - they were "asked" to learn such programs as Quark Express and before you could say Free Trade, they now had to design and put together the pages, then fill the columns up with their columns and stories.

Of course, no raises came with the increased "productivity" - just longer hours, more work and responsibility. Soon web design was added to the list.

Meanwhile, the papers were losing subscribers - to a great extent (my opinion) because the content had become so slavishly Pravda-like (repeating the Party Line on every topic) and this alienated readers who could now turn to the 'Net for their news.

The final stage is now underway: The few people still actually employed by newspapers are being fired en masse. What do you do with 20-plus years of experience in newspapering in this economy?

Can you say, "Would you like fries with that, sir?"

Eric
02-09-2010, 06:35 AM
Obama has less acknowledgement of this problem, than trying the terrorists in federal courts. He's happy to 'save jobs'. Saving jobs is another code word for: we'll pay teachers and SEIU, to keep the government entitlement system running. What does Obama think - all us unemployed folks are gonna build highways, bridges, and train beds??

Don't let them tell you your cover letter isn't good enough. Don't let them tell you your resume isn't good enough. It's a scam, that put's the blame on the unemployed person. They are really looking for wage slaves. Warm bodies, who don't have an opinion, are easily bullied, and work cheap.

I've been working since I'm 15, that's 45 yrs. Always been employed. Now I can't get a job / contract. It's not me, it's not you, it's the horrible mess our country has become.


Yes. It's the same all over.

Two years ago, I had more work available than I could take on. Today, I am struggling to earn half what I was earning then.

I think we all know people who are similarly affected. It can't be "us" - that we're suddenly no good at what we did, etc. The whole economy has turned upside down like a foundering battleship that's about to go under. The only people making money in this economy are the Shyster Class (Wall Street money manipulators, who produce nothing) and people on the government teat (such as defense contractors and government employees).

Ordinarily, such high unemployment would be socially volatile. But this time, it seems to be hitting the over-30s hardest and such people tend to be tied down by family and mellowed by age. They don't become violent quickly, usually. The just grind away, suffering in silence... .

Meanwhile, the younger people are used to "this" America so it doesn't bother them as much. To them, things are ok. Unlike us, they can't remember an America in which a college degree from a decent school virtually guaranteed a stable white collar job, in which you could afford to move out of your parents' home and consider raising a family of your own.

They are also the most ignorant and heavily propagandized (and thus, passive) generation of Americans that has ever lived.