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dom
04-21-2010, 01:26 PM
Dudes, I might attempt this myself.

Rational: I will purchase the tools to do it with the money I save.

0Pfp2Z9k0n0

AerHAYs435s

8WHkSPZJ3fI

I can get all the tools for around $50.

Thinking about it..

Eric
04-22-2010, 07:49 AM
Dudes, I might attempt this myself.

Rational: I will purchase the tools to do it with the money I save.

0Pfp2Z9k0n0

AerHAYs435s

8WHkSPZJ3fI

I can get all the tools for around $50.

Thinking about it..


How accurate is the balancing?

I like the idea, too - but (for sport bikes that see very high speeds, especially) I definitely want my tires balanced precisely....

dom
04-22-2010, 09:12 AM
Dude, you aren't going to believe this but it says this is more accurate than computerized. According to what I have been coming across this is what race teams use! Doh

The balancer stand can be purchased for $30.

Some good tire wrenches maybe around $40.

Wheel weights a few bucks.

One trip to the motorcycle shop, with your wheel taken off, I'm guessing about the same price as the tools.

Eric
04-22-2010, 09:26 AM
Dude, you aren't going to believe this but it says this is more accurate than computerized. According to what I have been coming across this is what race teams use! Doh

The balancer stand can be purchased for $30.

Some good tire wrenches maybe around $40.

Wheel weights a few bucks.

One trip to the motorcycle shop, with your wheel taken off, I'm guessing about the same price as the tools.

Not to mention the downtime/hassle of taking the bike in! (With sport bikes, you often have to do this at least every year because soft-compound tires rarely last more than a few thousand miles.)

If true/as advertised, this is definitely the ticket.

dom
04-22-2010, 09:43 AM
Well, the only problems/questions I can foresee:



Do I leave the bearings/seals in the hub for the balance
Do I need to purchase special hub adapters
Where can I get the special no scratch pads
Do I leave the rotor and sprocket on (guessing yes)

I really think I am going to do this..

Ken
04-22-2010, 10:43 AM
Well, the only problems/questions I can foresee:



Do I leave the bearings/seals in the hub for the balance
Do I need to purchase special hub adapters
Where can I get the special no scratch pads
Do I leave the rotor and sprocket on (guessing yes)
I really think I am going to do this..


Anything that goes round with the wheel can affect the balance.

My advice would be;

1. Leave the bearings and seals in. Any imbalance there would be miniscule but there is nothing to be gained by taking them out.

2. Conical adaptors are fine but they must not be 'tightened' otherwise they will pre-load the wheel bearings and add friction to the set-up. A contact just sufficient to eliminate rock is all that is needed. Ideally just use a bar that is just a sliding clearance fit in the wheel bearings.

3. Try a motor accessory shop (My first choice), or search on-line.

4. Leave the disc rotors and sprockets on as they are rotating masses and can be out of balance.

Ken.

dom
04-22-2010, 01:25 PM
Wheel Balancing Stand (http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/3/13/133/25575/ITEM/Drag-Specialties-Wheel-Balancing-Stand.aspx?SiteID=CSE_Gbase_25575&WT.mc_ID=80003&zmam=88421133&zmas=1&zmac=45&zmap=25575)

http://www.ericpetersautos.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=362&stc=1&d=1271956967



Can be used to balance mounted tires or true wheels up to 12 wide
Most accurate balancing method available
Employs the same balancing method as used by most race teams
Optional adapter for Harley wheels sold separately

$32

grouch
04-24-2010, 05:16 PM
Dude, you aren't going to believe this but it says this is more accurate than computerized. According to what I have been coming across this is what race teams use! Doh

The balancer stand can be purchased for $30.

Some good tire wrenches maybe around $40.

Wheel weights a few bucks.

One trip to the motorcycle shop, with your wheel taken off, I'm guessing about the same price as the tools.


Well funded teams haven't used this method in years. I'd rather use a bubble balancer over this set up. It will work, no doubt about that but it's slower.

grouch
04-24-2010, 05:21 PM
Well, the only problems/questions I can foresee:



Do I leave the bearings/seals in the hub for the balance
Do I need to purchase special hub adapters
Where can I get the special no scratch pads
Do I leave the rotor and sprocket on (guessing yes)
I really think I am going to do this..


Removing the bearings often destroys them, or at least shortens their service life. You have to bang on them if you don't have a press and risk nicking races and such. If the rotor ans sprocket will clear the shaft, sure, leave them on.
If tire spoons aren't included, you want to pick up at least two,three if you can score them.

dom
04-25-2010, 09:06 AM
I pretty sure my bearings just slide right out once the grease seal is removed.

Considering removing the bearings, repacking them, then reinstalling the grease seals before I balance. I don't think it would make difference in the balance, but would like to just slap the wheel back on once it's good.

I checked at Sears and the spoons are around $20 each. I will snag a few.

One other thin I need to locate are the plastic pads to prevent scratching the rim.

Ken
04-25-2010, 09:49 AM
[quote=dom;122650]I pretty sure my bearings just slide right out once the grease seal is removed.

Considering removing the bearings, repacking them, then reinstalling the grease seals before I balance. I don't think it would make difference in the balance, but would like to just slap the wheel back on once it's good.


quote]

From my experience, Dom;

If your wheels have taper bearings then the inner race will just slide out but the outer race, as with a parallel bearing, should normally be a slight interference fit in the hub. I have yet to find a car or bike, using taper or parallel bearings, where the outer race, in an undamaged, correctly sized, bore, just slid out. If that happened then normally, either the race is undersized (possible but rare) or the hub bore is worn. Fractional wear can be overcome by the use of a good (Loctite) Bearing Fit compound. Significant wear means the hubs either need boring, sleeving and parallel reaming to the correct size or else new wheels are needed.

Ken.

grouch
04-25-2010, 01:51 PM
I pretty sure my bearings just slide right out once the grease seal is removed.

Considering removing the bearings, repacking them, then reinstalling the grease seals before I balance. I don't think it would make difference in the balance, but would like to just slap the wheel back on once it's good.

I checked at Sears and the spoons are around $20 each. I will snag a few.

One other thin I need to locate are the plastic pads to prevent scratching the rim.


You can cut old plastic milk cartons up for protective shims. You can cut them to what ever size and shape you need. That stuff is pretty rugged and will protect against a lot of scratches. One caveat though, they can be slippery and might slide out if you're not careful.

I've got two tire spoons and often wish I had at a third one. Check to make sure they don't have any burrs on them to nich the tire bead.

I've had wheel bearings in motorcycles that were nearly impossible to get out. I had some on my Concours that were so tight the wheel assembly was bouncing off the blocks when I tried to remove tham.

What kind of bike are we talking about? Be sure to get a sealant to put around the bead to seal it good. If you don't have any, you can use wheel bearing grease in a thin film to seal small pits and nicks.

dom
04-25-2010, 08:38 PM
1996 HD Electra Glide

I've had the wheel off before and the bearings slip right out once the grease seals are removed.

Good call on the gorilla snot, I will pick some up.

Also, I remember back at the car shop we had a tire iron with a plastic slip on it.

Wonder if I can find one or those for the removal process?

So, I'm going prop the wheel perimeter up on some 4x4s or something high enough to prevent the disc/sprocket from contacting the ground.

How hard do you think the busting the bead will be?

I think I could just step on it and bust it.. We'll see.

I'm not going to attempt this for a couple more weeks.

Thinking to purchase two nice irons, and smaller/cheap one.

Need to look at the Sears website a bit more.

grouch
04-26-2010, 11:59 AM
Sometimes you can break the bead by hand and sometimes it takes more. I've used a large C clamp with some 1 X 2 lumber to protect the rubber to break beads before. Now, is this tire tubeless or tubed?

dom
04-26-2010, 02:08 PM
I pretty certain it's tubeless.

I didn't even think of a C-clamp. That is perfect. I think its going to bust without it though.

dom
05-07-2010, 10:58 PM
With such a build-up I feel shmuckish to say this:

I called a place up the street and holmes said he would take care of my bust and remount for $20.

Thinking about just doing it.

Ken
05-08-2010, 05:09 AM
With such a build-up I feel shmuckish to say this:

I called a place up the street and holmes said he would take care of my bust and remount for $20.

Thinking about just doing it.


Yah Boo!. You thought it over, you bought the gear, you've had all the advice from the very best brains this forum has to offer. Bite the bullet, stiffen up the sinews, cry 'God Bless America', get the clamp and the irons out and bust that tire, Dom. (And save yourself twenty bucks.)

Ken.

dom
05-09-2010, 10:19 AM
LOL

The machine $30, the irons $20+.

I am going to make my final decision tonight.

dom
05-17-2010, 09:02 PM
Got the tire mounted, balanced, and new valve stem done for $27 at a mom an pop spot on a back road in the middle of nowhere!

Ken
05-18-2010, 05:08 AM
Got the tire mounted, balanced, and new valve stem done for $27 at a mom an pop spot on a back road in the middle of nowhere!

Ah, Dom, nota bene, fortuna favet fortibus! :D

Ken

grouch
05-19-2010, 10:31 PM
Got the tire mounted, balanced, and new valve stem done for $27 at a mom an pop spot on a back road in the middle of nowhere!


I always try to patronize local shops. I don't like to buy off the internet if I can avoid it. If you don't do business with the local shop, they'll close up and you'll pay top dollar at a big shop that may not give a darn. Mom and pop do. There's a shop like that about a mile from my house. He does good work and in some cases better than the bigger shops. I had a (now former) Kawasaki dealership fix the one electrical fault my Concours had under warranty and while they were at it, change the coolant. They quoted me $40 to change the coolant. When I picked it up, I was charged $60 to change the coolant and they didn't even fill it up. It help 3.8 quarts and I had to add 1.5 quarts to fill it. They also charged me $60 to change a fuse. The fuse kept blowing which is why it went to the dealer. It was under warranty and they didn't even try to fix it. I finally tracked the problem to a bad connection on the headlight plug. Once I found it, it took about 15 minutes to fix it. I made it a point to mention this on the Concours mailing list. Kawasaki also is on there. That gouging cost the dealership a LOT of business. I had planned to buy a $600 riding jacket with body armor. I didn't. They also had a smaller bike I was looking at for around town, I didn't buy that either. They lost their dealership about a year later.

dom
05-19-2010, 11:09 PM
Yeah..

I will keep a mom and pop alive any chance I get.

You know, I could not get one spot to mount my tire anywhere!

NOT ONE..

J. ZIMM
05-26-2010, 12:57 AM
How accurate is the balancing?

I like the idea, too - but (for sport bikes that see very high speeds, especially) I definitely want my tires balanced precisely....
:)For high speeds, you want a Dynamic Balancing job on your tires. What he is showing is a Static balance. That's OK for normal around town riding. Dynamic takes the side to side or shimmy out of the tire/wheel assembly. The same thing on a passenger tire. I use to have a machine that would do MO-MO tires and vehicle tires Dynamically. :cool:

DonTom
11-23-2010, 05:38 AM
Some good tire wrenches maybe around $40.Wouldn't this (http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-bead-breaker-98875.html)make the job a lot easier?


-Don-