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View Full Version : Why small trucks are hard to find.


Valentine One Radar Detector

grouch
05-28-2010, 09:08 PM
Ever wonder why it's so hard to find a good small pickup that's easy on fuel and reliable?

Eric
05-29-2010, 06:23 AM
Ever wonder why it's so hard to find a good small pickup that's easy on fuel and reliable?

I keep hoping Nissan will dump the current platform Frontier and go back to building the 2004-earlier version.

There's nothing wrong with the current Frontier - unless you don't want to have to buy a V-6 to get 4WD and prefer a smaller, more efficient truck.

dieseleverything
06-01-2010, 07:53 AM
Sucks to see all those little trucks crushed, isn't that the law in Japan or something?

We have a few at work and they are pretty cool, ours were made for the the US with a 25 MPH rear end, and "Off Road Only" stickers. They are a little delicate, but dependable if you treat them good (the one had 26,000 miles on a 25MPH rear, so figure 100k miles on the engine/trans).

Eric
06-01-2010, 08:08 AM
Sucks to see all those little trucks crushed, isn't that the law in Japan or something?

We have a few at work and they are pretty cool, ours were made for the the US with a 25 MPH rear end, and "Off Road Only" stickers. They are a little delicate, but dependable if you treat them good (the one had 26,000 miles on a 25MPH rear, so figure 100k miles on the engine/trans).

I have nothing against full-sized (or mid-sized) trucks; they're great if you need to be able to haul 4x8 sheets on a regular basis, or tow more than 5,000 pounds.

But I don't.

I definitely don't need a 15 mpg V-6 (or a 10 mpg V-8).

My Frontiers can return 30 mpg on the highway if driven moderately, which is damn good for a gas-engined pick-up.

The bed is not huge but it is 99 percent adequate for my needs - and I don't need to spend the extra money on a bigger truck for the remaining 1 percent.

The thing that really eats the weenie about the current mid-sized trucks (the ones that are worth a shit, anyhow - which leaves out the POS Ford Ranger and the Chevy Canyon/Colorado) is that you have to buy the V-6 to get 4WD - because of the weight, I suppose.

grouch
06-01-2010, 10:39 PM
Sucks to see all those little trucks crushed, isn't that the law in Japan or something?

We have a few at work and they are pretty cool, ours were made for the the US with a 25 MPH rear end, and "Off Road Only" stickers. They are a little delicate, but dependable if you treat them good (the one had 26,000 miles on a 25MPH rear, so figure 100k miles on the engine/trans).



I think Japan requires vehcles to be retired at 65,000 miles. I'm pretty sure that is around 100,000 kilometers. When you see ads for low mileage Japanese engines, that's where they come from.

Those trucks weren't crushed on purpose. The overpass was too low of an overhead. We have a truck driver at work by the name of Darrel and I was kidding him about going under too low a bridge with a car on top, then I found this picture below.

Dave Brand
06-02-2010, 04:00 AM
I think Japan requires vehcles to be retired at 65,000 miles. I'm pretty sure that is around 100,000 kilometers. When you see ads for low mileage Japanese engines, that's where they come from.

I'm not sure about that, but I believe Japanese inspection requirements are so tough that it's not worth keeping a car with that sort of mileage.

Until type approval regulations were tightened up a lot of used cars from Japan were imported into the UK (right-hand-drive for both markets). They were good value, as they were more or less worthless in Japan but had plenty of useful life left.

Eric
06-02-2010, 06:15 AM
I'm not sure about that, but I believe Japanese inspection requirements are so tough that it's not worth keeping a car with that sort of mileage.

Until type approval regulations were tightened up a lot of used cars from Japan were imported into the UK (right-hand-drive for both markets). They were good value, as they were more or less worthless in Japan but had plenty of useful life left.

"Retiring" a vehicle at 65k is criminally wasteful and also a vicious kick in the balls (for the consumer).

Just about any car built from the early '90s on is barely run-in at 65k and should have at least another 65k of useful life left. Many (assuming decent treatment and regular maintenance) will happily run fro 200,000 miles before major systems begin to fail or show evidence of obvious excessive wear.

grouch
06-02-2010, 10:44 PM
I'm not sure about that, but I believe Japanese inspection requirements are so tough that it's not worth keeping a car with that sort of mileage.

Until type approval regulations were tightened up a lot of used cars from Japan were imported into the UK (right-hand-drive for both markets). They were good value, as they were more or less worthless in Japan but had plenty of useful life left.



If you want to see strict vehicle inspection regulations, try New Zealand. If your car is more than 5 or 6 years old, it has to be like new to pass inspection. I've got a friend in Australia and he's seen a lot of cars exported as it was cheaper than fixing the car. Oz isn't easy on them either, but not as bad as the Kiwi's are.