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Eric
11-07-2010, 02:38 PM
Several of the new-issue (2011) diesel vehicles I've driven such as the Benz E-Class and Chevy Duramax 1500 have urea tanks as part of their emissions control systems. The urea is sprayed into the hot exhaust stream ahead of the converter to spur a chemical reaction that lowers NOx emissions - if I understand it right.

Anyway, the car companies are being very coy about the cost of topping the tanks off, how often they'll need topping off - and so on. I'm wondering whether anyone has more specific information or knows where to find it?

If I were in the market for a diesel vehicle, having to deal with urea would be a big turnoff. I think I'd rather buy an older/used model instead.

How about you?

MikeHalloran
11-07-2010, 02:49 PM
Yeah, I'd do that too.

We're not alone; there was a run on 'old style' engines just before their sale was prohibited, so fleet demand is now below former levels and expected to ramp up slowly, as most fleets were freshened with old style engines.

Which partly explains the manufacturers' reticence; they have laboratory data, and probably a little from 'captive' fleets, but very little data on real fleets, because the number of newish fleets with new technology engines is still quite small.

I'm sure the engine manufacturers are waiting/fearing the data and/or warranty reports.

Eric
11-07-2010, 03:00 PM
Yeah, I'd do that too.

We're not alone; there was a run on 'old style' engines just before their sale was prohibited, so fleet demand is now below former levels and expected to ramp up slowly, as most fleets were freshened with old style engines.

Which partly explains the manufacturers' reticence; they have laboratory data, and probably a little from 'captive' fleets, but very little data on real fleets, because the number of newish fleets with new technology engines is still quite small.

I'm sure the engine manufacturers are waiting/fearing the data and/or warranty reports.

Yep.

I bet it begins to show up on the cost of consumer goods, especially food, too.

After all, it now costs more to operate the big rigs that deliver the goods - and the owners/operators have to figure in potential down-the-road costs, too.

What a mess....

MikeHalloran
11-07-2010, 09:17 PM
Here's an interesting tidbit.
DEF is approximately 2/3 water, and freezes at 11.3 degrees F.
Winter could be interesting...

MikeHalloran
11-07-2010, 09:50 PM
It's otherwise innocuous:
http://www.mansfieldoil.com//images//air1%20pis.pdf