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dom
12-03-2010, 10:38 AM
What are the best options for getting heat on a bike?

I've seen gloves in the neighborhood of $150 or more.

Also, I've seen suits that are WAY more than that.

Where is the best spot to locate economically price heated motorcycle gear and what is a good brand/style?

Ken
12-03-2010, 03:55 PM
What are the best options for getting heat on a bike?

I've seen gloves in the neighborhood of $150 or more.

Also, I've seen suits that are WAY more than that.

Where is the best spot to locate economically price heated motorcycle gear and what is a good brand/style?


From what I can see, Dom, there is no such thing as (good) cheap heated gear. The top names over your side seem to be Gerbings, Keis, Blazewear and - a new one on me - 1st Heat. Typically if you want to ride warm and snug you are looking at laying out a good few hundred dollars. I feel sure that the hardier riders on our famous On Two Wheels forum will soon be chipping in with the best advice available on your side of the pond.

Looking at options over here I can get Keis Vest, Gloves and controller for around 325/$520 whilst going for the Gerbings jacket and trousers plus gloves is heading for the 1000/$1600 mark. Heated socks are also available at extra cost. Keeping warm is nice but cheap it ain't!

Ken.

grouch
12-03-2010, 07:12 PM
What are the best options for getting heat on a bike?

I've seen gloves in the neighborhood of $150 or more.

Also, I've seen suits that are WAY more than that.

Where is the best spot to locate economically price heated motorcycle gear and what is a good brand/style?


I used heated gloves when I had my Concours. Between the engine heat, the fairing and my electric gloves, I was toasty warm all the time. One problem with heated gear is it take current from the alternator/battery system. You want an electrical system that has enough wattage to power the gear. Around town, my gloves were sort of warm but not too much. On the highway with the engine cranked up, I often had to stick my hands past the faring into the air stream. You can get a heat-troller to control the heat and tone it down but my hands are very sensitive to cold and the gloves let me ride if the bike would start. Usually, if it was about 30 degrees (F) or so, the bike would start and I'd ride.

Adam
12-03-2010, 08:25 PM
Dom if there are any motorcycle events in your area is a good way to get stuff like heated gloves. You can buy directly from the suppliers and sometimes on the last day of the shows they'll sell for less so they don't have to haul them back. I think motorcycle shows are the best places to get apparel, and plenty of stuff for your motorcycling pleasure.

dom
12-04-2010, 10:33 PM
Yeah, I think if I could just score some gloves I would be fine.

Temperature is holding tight at my house in the high 20s and will be remaining there and lower for the rest of the winter. I commute 50 miles to work (each way) and usually I put one hand on the rear cylinder to warm it up and alternate between hands.

As far as the charging system being able to handle the draw, I think I am okay.

My unit is an old cop bike, so it has the beefed up alternator/generator.

Thanks for all the info guys.

If I wuss out and just stop riding for the winter that is okay too. -don't want to though

I have a Baker six speed over drive (Baker OD6) sitting outside waiting to be installed.

Shoot, might even crack the engine open and have the machine shop go through it.

We'll see.

grouch
12-05-2010, 06:53 PM
Concours owners tend to be rather chea.....er....thrifty. They also tend to ride in all weather. Head over to their web site at concours.org and see what you can find. Their tech and FAQ area may have some info for you. I see it on the mailing list from time to time. Since I'm bikeless right now (sniffle) I haven't been looking very hard.