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DonTom
06-03-2007, 02:26 AM
In my 1999 Dodge Ram 1500 (5.2L) pickup truck, I checked the tire PSI today. The sticker on the driverr side door jam says fill to 41 PSI. I hear we are supposed to go by this sticker and not what it says on the tire.

But what about when the max pressure on all four tires say "35 PSI maximun", but the sticker on the vehicle says 41 PSI is the normal PSI? That's the case with this truck! This is the first I have seen a higher PSI on the sticker than the max shown on the tires.

So should it be 35 or 41 PSI?

-Don-

mrblanche
06-03-2007, 02:37 AM
Are the tires on it the original tires, or identical thereto? If not, did you check that the size was identical, including any "LT" size code?

Eric
06-03-2007, 08:30 AM
In my 1999 Dodge Ram 1500 (5.2L) pickup truck, I checked the tire PSI today. The sticker on the driverr side door jam says fill to 41 PSI. I hear we are supposed to go by this sticker and not what it says on the tire.

But what about when the max pressure on all four tires say "35 PSI maximun", but the sticker on the vehicle says 41 PSI is the normal PSI? That's the case with this truck! This is the first I have seen a higher PSI on the sticker than the max shown on the tires.

So should it be 35 or 41 PSI?

-Don-


Are the tires you have OE? Or OE spec? It doesn't sound like they are. I'd be careful about over-inflating the tires - and would not exceed the stated max recommended psi listed on the tire sidewall.

chiph
06-03-2007, 10:33 AM
I'd also be careful about carrying any heavy loads until you can verify this.

Chip H.

mrblanche
06-03-2007, 11:40 AM
It's pouring down rain here (again), or I'd go out and check on my F150. It has the original LT tires on it, and I don't remember the recommendations on it. I know I check them and go to the full allowable pressure when I carry a capacity load.

DonTom
06-03-2007, 06:37 PM
"Are the tires on it the original tires, or identical thereto?"

The sticker says the tires should be P225/75R16XL.

All four tires are P245/75R16.

-Don-

MikeHalloran
06-03-2007, 07:35 PM
Use the pressure marked on the tire.

The originals must have been replaced with tires that can't take quite as much pressure.

DonTom
06-04-2007, 09:36 AM
"Use the pressure marked on the tire."

That's what I figured. But I didn't check what the tires said until after I filled them all to 41. I will remove a few PSI before I use the truck.

BTW, is the "P245" mean my tires are thicker than stock?

BTW, this pickup truck has a habit of fishtailing in snow, but they are all AT tires. Is there anything else practical that can help in the snow? By any chance would thinner stock tires be better in snow ?

Or is this rather normal for longer pickups (quad door cab) in the snow? We try not to drive it in the snow anymore after a few near accidents and sliding off the road more than once. All four brakes seem to be okay, but this happens when braking. It does have ABS, but there doesn't seem to be any indication that it is really working. I cannot hear the brakes "click" in the snow as I can with my Jeep. We usually drive the 4WD Jeep in the snow, but once in a great while, we need a truck to move something or whatever.

-Don-

chiph
06-04-2007, 10:25 AM
BTW, is the "P245" mean my tires are thicker than stock?

Wider. The value is in millimeters.

Too wide or too narrow, and they won't fit the wheel rim.

Chip H.

DonTom
06-04-2007, 11:01 AM
Wider. The value is in millimeters.

That was what I meant. Wider, not "thicker".

Thanks for the info.

-Don-

mrblanche
06-04-2007, 12:50 PM
BTW, this pickup truck has a habit of fishtailing in snow, but they are all AT tires. Is there anything else practical that can help in the snow? By any chance would thinner stock tires be better in snow ?

Or is this rather normal for longer pickups (quad door cab) in the snow? We try not to drive it in the snow anymore after a few near accidents and sliding off the road more than once. All four brakes seem to be okay, but this happens when braking. It does have ABS, but there doesn't seem to be any indication that it is really working. I cannot hear the brakes "click" in the snow as I can with my Jeep. We usually drive the 4WD Jeep in the snow, but once in a great while, we need a truck to move something or whatever.

-Don-[/color]


Pickups are usually pretty lousy in snow, due to their weight being concentrated in the front. It SHOULD have Positraction, but may not. That helps, but it's not a cure-all.

The wider tires could make handling a little worse on the highway, because the tires are made for a little wider rim, so the sidewalls are flexing. The lower pressure will contribute to that. LT (or XL) tires have stiffer sidewalls, usually.

In other words, someone did you no favor by putting car tires on that truck.

MikeHalloran
06-04-2007, 05:20 PM
By any chance would thinner stock tires be better in snow ?

Narrower tires with aggressive tread would be less awful in snow.

A few hundred pounds of sand, cement, tools, whatever, in the bed would help more.

mrblanche
06-05-2007, 04:42 PM
I have driven pickups in the snow, and I've always gotten where I'm going...but I can't say it was fun.

Dave Brand
06-06-2007, 05:42 AM
The sticker says the tires should be P225/75R16XL.

All four tires are P245/75R16.



Have you checked the load rating on the tyres? I don't know what 'XL' signifies, but I suspect it could mean 'extra load' or something similar. The fact that the tyres are marked with a lower maximum pressure than the truck manufacturer specifies leads me to believe that you may have tyres which are not load-rated high enough for the vehicle weight.

I'd inflate to the maximum pressure marked on the tyre, but as this is well below the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressure it could have an adverse effect on handling.

I think the best thing you can do is contact the tyre manufacturer & ask if these tyres are suitable for your truck; if they are suitable they should also be able to give advice on the correct pressure to run them at.

DonTom
06-07-2007, 12:41 AM
I often hear about the disadvantages of wider tires. Poorer MPG. not as good in snow, etc.

But what are the advantages, if any, of wider tires?

-Don-

mrblanche
06-07-2007, 02:25 AM
More bling.

And, theoretically, more traction on pavement.

DonTom
06-07-2007, 02:44 AM
"More bling"

WTF (excuse my army talk) is "bling"?

-Don-

Eric
06-07-2007, 08:49 AM
"More bling"

WTF (excuse my army talk) is "bling"?

-Don-


It's a "hip hop" rap culture term; it refers to gaudy equipment like add-on chrome, oversized wheels, etc. Think Caddy Escalade with 21 inch wheels and thug rap booming on the stereo...

DonTom
06-07-2007, 09:36 AM
It's a "hip hop" rap culture term

My age is showing again--along with the fact of having no kids. ;D

-Don-

Eric
06-07-2007, 10:18 AM
It's a "hip hop" rap culture term

My age is showing again--along with the fact of having no kids. ;D

-Don-


Don't worry about it - you are not missing out on anything.

Rap - and rap "culture" - is perhaps the most loathsome, noxious development of the past 20 years.

Even worse than the cell phone!

chiph
06-07-2007, 10:31 AM
It might be good to refer to it as an anti-culture.

Chip H.

Eric
06-07-2007, 10:36 AM
It might be good to refer to it as an anti-culture.

Chip H.



That's a good way of looking at it... . Rap is the deadening, inarticulate noise of the ghetto thug (white or black). It is abrasive, ugly, coarse - the embodiment of a "Lord of the Flies" worldview that glorifies violence, sexual domination and power-lust.

It hasn't even got the redeeming quality of musical talent, either. It is atonal, monotonous - defined by a crude "beat" accompanied by a fast-talking thug spewing doggerel "poetry." (Heavy metal rock, at least, usually involves actual instruments played by actual musicians - not electronically-generated "tracks" for the thug to "rhyme" to, etc.)

To paraphrase a line, when I hear rap music, I reach for my gun... .

DonTom
06-07-2007, 11:44 AM
"Rap - and rap "culture" - is perhaps the most loathsome, noxious development of the past 20 years."

I think of rap crap as scumbag noise. It certinly doesn't qualify as music. But there was a time when the same was said about Evils.

BTW, the next time my truck needs tires, I will make sure that they put on stock tires.

-Don-

mrblanche
06-07-2007, 01:23 PM
I think of rap crap as scumbag noise. It certinly doesn't qualify as music. But there was a time when the same was said about Evils.

BTW, the next time my truck needs tires, I will make sure that they put on stock tires.

-Don-



Would that be Evils Parsley?

DonTom
06-08-2007, 09:02 AM
"Would that be Evils Parsley?"

Elvis Presley, of course. I don't know how I managed to spell it like that!

BTW, since my tires are wider than stock, does that mean my rims are nonstock too?

-Don-

Eric
06-08-2007, 09:18 AM
"Would that be Evils Parsley?"

Elvis Presley, of course. I don't know how I managed to spell it like that!

BTW, since my tires are wider than stock, does that mean my rims are nonstock too?

-Don-


Probably not.

Usually, you can fit larger/wider tires on a given rim than the tires that came OE.

For example, my Trans-Am originally came with 225/70-15 radials mounted on 15x7 rims.

I still have the OE 15x7 rims, but I use 245/60-15 tires, which fit perfectly.

swamprat
06-08-2007, 09:45 PM
"Would that be Evils Parsley?"

Elvis Presley, of course. I don't know how I managed to spell it like that!

BTW, since my tires are wider than stock, does that mean my rims are nonstock too?

-Don-


Probably not.

Usually, you can fit larger/wider tires on a given rim than the tires that came OE.

For example, my Trans-Am originally came with 225/70-15 radials mounted on 15x7 rims.

I still have the OE 15x7 rims, but I use 245/60-15 tires, which fit perfectly.


You need a set of 20" chrome dubs on it with 35 series tires! LOL

Eric
06-09-2007, 11:32 AM
"You need a set of 20" chrome dubs on it with 35 series tires! LOL"

If I ever mutilate my car in that way, I hereby forfeit any right to continued oxygen... and may the ghost of John Z. have mercy on my soul!

Now here's a good-looking wheel:

ChevyMan
06-16-2007, 08:37 PM
While on subject of "tires",

Car with Front Wheel drive
Front tire treads looks more wore down than Rear pair
Manual recommends 'cross switching' (rotation)
Why not just switch RF to RR and LF to LR ??
Makes the job easier
What's your preference on such topic ??

DonTom
06-16-2007, 09:42 PM
"Why not just switch RF to RR and LF to LR ??"

My guess would be to help make up for slight differences in alignment.

I assume it would make no difference if everything was perfect, such as alignment being absolutely perfect.

But this isn't a perfect world, just as Wallgreens says ;D.

-Don-

chiph
06-16-2007, 09:42 PM
If they're directional tread, then rotating straight-back is pretty much the only option. Otherwise, I would criss-cross them to extend their life.

Pity the poor owners of high-end cars with directional tread *and* different sized wheels front-to-back. They can't rotate at all -- if there's excessive or unusual wear, their only option is to fix the problem and replace the tire.

Chip H.

mrblanche
06-17-2007, 10:37 AM
While on subject of "tires",

Car with Front Wheel drive
Front tire treads looks more wore down than Rear pair
Manual recommends 'cross switching' (rotation)
Why not just switch RF to RR and LF to LR ??
Makes the job easier
What's your preference on such topic ??




I usually just move front to back, probably from a long prejudice against reversing the rotation of radial tires, which experts say is not longer a concern.

Another plan would be to just wear out the front tires and replace them, and not worry about rotation. That way, you'll only have to replace two tires at a time, instead of four.



[/quote]

Dave Brand
06-17-2007, 01:03 PM
Another plan would be to just wear out the front tires and replace them, and not worry about rotation. That way, you'll only have to replace two tires at a time, instead of four.


That's my thinking. Tyre rotation seems to me to be something only Americans do. I think it can actually reduce the life of a tyre, as wear patterns fro& side to side tend to be different. Moving a tyre to another location can result in excessive wear over apart of the tread until it wears to the pattern of its new position; frequent rotation will exacerbate the problem.

D_E_Davis
06-17-2007, 02:56 PM
That's my thinking. Tyre rotation seems to me to be something only Americans do. I think it can actually reduce the life of a tyre, as wear patterns fro& side to side tend to be different. Moving a tyre to another location can result in excessive wear over apart of the tread until it wears to the pattern of its new position; frequent rotation will exacerbate the problem.

That seems to be contrary to my not-extensive experience. For several cars now I've had no trouble exceeding the tire maker's warranted life, and I'm a regular rotator. Now, that remark of yours would certainly hold true for a vehicle with alignment problems.

Dave Brand
06-18-2007, 01:44 PM
For several cars now I've had no trouble exceeding the tire maker's warranted life, and I'm a regular rotator.


Warranted life is, I would think, set at a very low figure to give the illusion of security without the need to pay out!

D_E_Davis
06-18-2007, 03:59 PM
Warranted life is, I would think, set at a very low figure to give the illusion of security without the need to pay out!

Not today, it appears. On the Lumina the OEM set was warrented at 60,000 miles, and exceeded that - the present set has a figure of 40,ooo and looks to pass that quite well.

Dave Brand
06-19-2007, 07:46 AM
Not today, it appears. On the Lumina the OEM set was warrented at 60,000 miles, and exceeded that - the present set has a figure of 40,ooo and looks to pass that quite well.


60,000 miles? If I get 25,000 miles out of a tyre I consider myself lucky! I can't help thinking that to get such high mileage they are using a very hard tread compound; they must be compromising grip in the interests of longevity.

mrblanche
06-19-2007, 09:00 AM
Or living better through the miracles of chemistry.

D_E_Davis
06-19-2007, 11:34 AM
60,000 miles? If I get 25,000 miles out of a tyre I consider myself lucky! I can't help thinking that to get such high mileage they are using a very hard tread compound; they must be compromising grip in the interests of longevity.

That reply astounds me - I can't imagine why you should get such a short life. I suspect the general state of the road surfaces here are no better than in GB. And, no, I haven't had any complaints about cornoring adhesion or wet traction.

Perhaps you should get your next set from a US dealer, if the customs duty isn't too much.

Dave Brand
06-20-2007, 08:25 AM
That reply astounds me - I can't imagine why you should get such a short life.


That's roughly the sort of mileage I was getting from Goodyear NCT2's on my Peugeot 405 - 10 tyres in 62,000 miles. No doubt I could have got higher mileage tyres; I also replace tyres when the tread wears down to 2mm - UK legislation requires a minimum of 1,6mm

chiph
06-20-2007, 10:25 AM
I think the difference is in the nature of our roads -- we tend to do much longer distances on smooth (well.. relatively smooth) interstates that have broad curves, so there is little rubber being scrubbed off the tires.

I have ~40,000 miles on the Goodyears, and they're about halfway through their tread. It's not an especially sticky tire, but it channels water really well and does OK in light snow.

Chip H.

D_E_Davis
06-20-2007, 12:19 PM
That's roughly the sort of mileage I was getting from Goodyear NCT2's on my Peugeot 405 - 10 tyres in 62,000 miles. No doubt I could have got higher mileage tyres; I also replace tyres when the tread wears down to 2mm - UK legislation requires a minimum of 1,6mm

I'm still puzzled. A search tells me that the "NCT2" is a flavor of the Eagle line, and that's what came on the Lumina as OEM equipment which (as I stated) went over 60,000 miles before replacement. I am baffled by the disparity.

Like most others I observe the "tread wear bars" moulded in - when they appear flush with the rest of the tread there is about 1.8mm tread remaining.