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swamprat
07-02-2007, 12:06 AM
For years, I have run H-rated tires on my cars. In general, H-rated tires provide great handling, traction and steering response. Wear and tear is generally good with that speed rating as well. Rated at 130 mph, it is adequate for most driving in the United States. (I personally have only hit that speed once in my lifetime.) Ride quality is generally good with most brands that have fit my car. As far as noise goes, H-rated rubber can be quiet or noisy depending on the road surface. Generally, in my opinion, H-rated tires offer the best performance value for the dollar. The only drawback, which is becoming a lot more important these days, is the sticky tire's affect on rolling resistance, and thus gas mileage.

Has anyone heard of the effect on gas mileage by switching from T to H rated tires? What is the effect on handling? Is it possible to get a T-rated tire that offers good steering response as well as handling. For me, I am willing to give up the traction for a mile to the gallon more, but I don't want to give up steering response or cornering stiffness. Any ideas?

D_E_Davis
07-02-2007, 12:26 AM
I would suspect that, everything else being equal, the T tire would be indistinguishable from the H tire. There are speed ratings and as such don't yield a clue as to adhesion, noise, and/or wear. One determinant of the speed rating is the tread thickness from the outer surface to its junction with the belts. At very high speeds the centrifugal force acts to rip the tread free. Aircraft tires, for example, often have fabric moulded into the tread rubber to prevent seperation.

Eric
07-02-2007, 09:27 AM
For years, I have run H-rated tires on my cars. In general, H-rated tires provide great handling, traction and steering response. Wear and tear is generally good with that speed rating as well. Rated at 130 mph, it is adequate for most driving in the United States. (I personally have only hit that speed once in my lifetime.) Ride quality is generally good with most brands that have fit my car. As far as noise goes, H-rated rubber can be quiet or noisy depending on the road surface. Generally, in my opinion, H-rated tires offer the best performance value for the dollar. The only drawback, which is becoming a lot more important these days, is the sticky tire's affect on rolling resistance, and thus gas mileage.

Has anyone heard of the effect on gas mileage by switching from T to H rated tires? What is the effect on handling? Is it possible to get a T-rated tire that offers good steering response as well as handling. For me, I am willing to give up the traction for a mile to the gallon more, but I don't want to give up steering response or cornering stiffness. Any ideas?


I'd be surprised if there's a noticeable difference in fuel economy, H vs. T - assuming the tread profiles are similar. And that's the rub, I'd guess. H-rated tires, being performance-type tires, will tend to have more aggressive tread patterns/compounds than a "general driving" tire with a lower speed rating.

But I'd bet you'd need to seriously downgrade your rolling stock to notice any fuel economy benefit. (For example, by changing to smaller wheels/tires with less rolling resistance, etc. - which would really screw your car's handling.)

The difference might be more noticeable if you were driving a truck with really aggressive M/S knobbies - and swapped them for all-seasons, etc. But assuming you keep the same size rims - and stick with the same size tires - I doubt swapping from H to T is going to make much, if any difference at all, MPG-wise...