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Eric
02-03-2008, 10:11 AM
Working on cars is fun - most of the time. But there are some jobs on some cars that are as enjoyable as a root canal. I have never liked servicing automatic transmissions - especially those not equipped with a drain plug. Even with a large catch pan, it's no easy trick to avoid being splashed by ATF - and that stuff is hell to get out of your hair. Only gear oil is worse. All my vehicles have drain plugs - an easy thing to install. But most new cars do not have them, so if you're working on someone else's car... ugh!

Replacing subframe biscuits is no treat, either.....

chiph
02-03-2008, 12:34 PM
Changing the rear diff fluid.

It's easy to get to the fill & drain plugs (hint: Always remove the fill one first), but when it comes time to put the new dual-pump fluid in, it's a real pain to get the bottle above the diff so that it'll pour in (the floorpan gets in the way). Even a turkey baster doesn't work.

So now I just pay someone else to do it.

Chip H.

Eric
02-03-2008, 01:12 PM
Changing the rear diff fluid.

It's easy to get to the fill & drain plugs (hint: Always remove the fill one first), but when it comes time to put the new dual-pump fluid in, it's a real pain to get the bottle above the diff so that it'll pour in (the floorpan gets in the way). Even a turkey baster doesn't work.

So now I just pay someone else to do it.

Chip H.



I know a trick that helps -

Take your bottle of gear lube and find a length of rubber hose (such as fuel hose) that is the same diameter as the nipple. You'll need appx. a foot or so, depending on the position of the fill hole. Now you can snake the flexible hose into the hole, position the bottle of gear lube at a place where you can empty its contents into the diff - and viola!

You may need to squeeze the bottle a bit, but this little trick does work quite well and makes the job a lot easier...

Helpful hint: If you need to add one of those small tubes of "limited slip additive" - just empty that into your 3/4 empty bottle of gear lube; makes it easier to get that stuff in than trying to work that little tube into the hard to get at fill hole!

chiph
02-03-2008, 02:53 PM
Thanks for the advice -- but I still think it's easier to pay someone else.
:-)

The CR-V is different from the usual RWD 'pumpkin' differential -- it uses two hydraulic pumps that work off the difference in rotational speed from the front & rear wheels (the prop shaft from the front of the car is turning at the same speed as the front wheels) to engage a clutch pack. It works in both forward and reverse gears when accelerating, but not when coasting or decellerating (which could cause you to spin out)

What you put in it is not gear lube, nor transmission fluid, but hydraulic fluid (Honda calls it 'Dual Pump Fluid'), and it's about $6 per quart (you need about 1.2 quarts), change interval is 90k per Honda USA, but that will cause expensive problems -- wise owners change it every 30k.

I'm due in about 1200 miles...

Chip H.

misterdecibel
02-03-2008, 05:57 PM
In the Fiat X 1/9 the master cylinders for the brakes and the hydraulic clutch were both buried under the dashboard, bolted to the steering column mount. If one of them went bad, it would start dripping hydraulic fluid on your shoes. Changing them out was a major mess, involving a lot of disassembly and crawling into tight spaces, with hydraulic fluid dripping on your face.

grouch
02-03-2008, 06:38 PM
Working on cars is fun - most of the time. But there are some jobs on some cars that are as enjoyable as a root canal. I have never liked servicing automatic transmissions - especially those not equipped with a drain plug. Even with a large catch pan, it's no easy trick to avoid being splashed by ATF - and that stuff is hell to get out of your hair. Only gear oil is worse. All my vehicles have drain plugs - an easy thing to install. But most new cars do not have them, so if you're working on someone else's car... ugh!

Replacing subframe biscuits is no treat, either.....




I don't change my own oil. I'll change engines but not oil. A friend has an oil change shop a block from my house. He lets me walk around underneath and check the under carriage so I don't have to crawl under the car to catch problems as they start to form. I don't have to dispose of the oil either and they top up all the fluids while they're at it. Just about any engine repair regarding the timing belt or serpentine belt on an FWD vehicle is murder anymore. There's just no room to work on them. Yes, it does make it faster and cheaper to build the car but service in the field is a nightmare.


I've always said that if I ran a car company and the engineers came up with a new way to store the jack and spare, they would be out in the parking lot at 2am in the rain to change a tire. I'm pretty sure the next day they would be redesigning it. That said, one minor repair from the past that has gotten unbelievably difficult is battery replacement. I put a new battery in a lady friends car and had to remove the right front tire to get to ti. :-\

misterdecibel
02-04-2008, 01:05 AM
I put a new battery in a lady friends car and had to remove the right front tire to get to ti. :-\


What kind of car was it?

Eric
02-04-2008, 07:56 AM
"That said, one minor repair from the past that has gotten unbelievably difficult is battery replacement. I put a new battery in a lady friends car and had to remove the right front tire to get to it."

Very true!

I take a gander at the battery location on most of the new cars I test out; more and more of 'em have "remote" (trunk or somewhere else) located batteries, with a "power point" for jumping, etc. under the hood. At least that is accessible. But removing/re-installing the battery now often requires more tools than the average non-gearhead has - as well as skill/patience!

DonTom
02-04-2008, 07:04 PM
"It's easy to get to the fill & drain plugs (hint: Always remove the fill one first), but when it comes time to put the new dual-pump fluid in, it's a real pain to get the bottle above the diff so that it'll pour in (the floorpan gets in the way). "

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/268342-post18.html

-Don-

grouch
02-04-2008, 07:39 PM
I put a new battery in a lady friends car and had to remove the right front tire to get to ti. :-\


What kind of car was it?



It was a late 90's Chrysler Cirrus. She didn't have the car 4 months when it got plastered sitting in front of her house by a drunk driver. I thought the refinery down the road blew up because of the noise. No rebuilding that car either. He didn't have insurance either of course. On the other hand, I know where he's eating and sleeping for a few more months.

robmcg
02-08-2008, 12:43 PM
Heater systems buried deep in dashboard area would be the worst things to work on... although they don't often need work.
Disturbing all the plastic appears to violate certain laws of nature. I have seen some guys with an ability to strip a dashboard with ease, but it follows rules and laws I simply cannot grasp.

My '73 XJ6 was still in excellent running order in 2002 when the vacuum-operated heater flaps stopped working; a small vacuum tank had corroded. I think the entire car has been constructed around this heater operating system. I could have jury-rigged a system where the heater was always on, or off, but in the end took the easy option and sold the car... oh, and it wasn't plastic either. <g>

misterdecibel
02-08-2008, 02:46 PM
Mechanics used to joke that the 1960s Ford Galaxie/LTD's construction started with a heater core on the assembly line, with the rest of the car built around it.

Eric
02-09-2008, 08:39 AM
Mechanics used to joke that the 1960s Ford Galaxie/LTD's construction started with a heater core on the assembly line, with the rest of the car built around it.


I forgot about those things. Gawd. That is the worst job ever.

When I had the AC system on my TA rebuilt, I also had them put in a new heater core. Even I am no longer interested in doing some jobs!