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Valentine One Radar Detector

Ken
02-07-2008, 01:58 PM
Been browsing and found a few interesting statistics. Statistics are interesting things, depending upon which way you manipulate the numbers you can make them prove anything you like.

A FEW SOBERING THOUGHTS.

WHERE IS YOUR BIKE MOST LIKELY TO BE STOLEN FROM?
According to a recent National Crime Intelligence Service report 80% of performance bikes, of 500cc or more, are stolen from the owner's home.
(So beat the thieving scum by leaving your bike at your mate's house?)

HOW LIKELY ARE YOU TO GET YOUR STOLEN BIKE BACK?
Only 16% of stolen bikes are recovered, make sure your bike is kept as secure as possible.

ON A MORE SERIOUS NOTE.
In the United Kingdon 6,485 riders were killed or seriously injured (KSI'd) in 2006.
The number of 'slightly injured' riders was 16,842.
20.8% of those KSI'd were between the ages of 40 - 49
5.6% of those KSI'd were female

WORST YEAR?
The worst year for motorcyclist deaths? - 1930 with 1,832 riders killed.

MOTORCYCLE KSI PER ROAD CLASS IN 2006.
Motorway, 150
A Road, 3,282
B Road, 968
Other Roads, 2,084
(And yes, I know the above figures don't add up to 6,845 but thats statistics for you.)

OTHER VEHICLE INVOLVEMENT.
18% of motorcycling accidents involve a single vehicle - presumably the bike.
69% of motorcycle accidents involve a car. ( Now why doesn't that surprise me?)

HOW MANY?
In 1905 there were 21,521 licensed motorcycles in the UK.
In 2006 there were 1,220,000 licensed motorcycles in the UK.
That is an increase of 5569%.

Although biker fatality rates are about 40 times higher than car drivers things are impproving. The KSI rate between 1994 and 2006 is down by 27%.

RISKY PLACES.
London is the place where you are not only most likely to get murdered, or die from a dodgy kebab, according the Bennets, one of our biggest bike insurers it is also the place you are most likely to crash in.


ON A LIGHTER NOTE - how a politician would use statistics.

SOBER DRIVERS ARE MORE OF A MENACE ON THE ROAD THEN DRUNKEN ONES.
FACT - Only 7% of accidents are caused by drunken drivers, ergo, keep all the sober ones off the road and cut the accident rate by 93%.

SPEEDING DRIVERS CAUSE 5% OF ACCIDENTS.
fact - Only 5% of accidents are directly caused by speed says the Winston report. Only let drivers with nine speeding points on the road and cut accident rates by another 95%

Thanks to Superbike magazine for most of the above snippets of information.

Ken.

Eric
02-08-2008, 07:59 AM
Very interesting stuff; I wonder what the equivalent stats are for the US?

Bike theft is less common here, I think. Might be because there's less opportunity? (Most of us have garages/park indoors - or at least, in a place where the bike is visible while it's sitting.)

I know that motorcycle accidents/fatalities are rising rapidly here; part of this is due to the much-increased rider pool - and in particular, the increase in over-40 new (or returning) riders. Big contentious issue here...

In my area, we have had a spate of accidents involving... deer. The critters are everywhere and have a habit of just jumping intot he road (or even right onto the rider) without any warning. It's one reason I avoid riding at night around here....

DonTom
02-08-2008, 08:43 AM
My 1984 Yamaha Venture got ripped off many years ago and was recovered without the saddlebags, travel trunk, etc.

One thing that can help is to NOT follow instructions on vehicle alarms. Make sure that if the ignition is turned on with the key it will still alarm. Most bike locks can be broken to a working mode (included when forks are locked) in about the same speed as using a key. And when the lock is broken in such a way, the alarm "thinks" the key is being used so there is no alarm sound.

My bike now has the alarm work in such a way that if the same thing is done again, the alarm will sound as I get paged. But I have to remember to do something before I put in the key. Something nobody else would even think about.

I also modified my 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee's alarm in such a way that the keyless entry is the only way to open the door without the alarm sounding. IOW, if the key is used (or if any door key lock is broken) the alarm will still sound. I modified this after I had an alarm problem that kept the interior lights on. That was from a broken switch bracket on the rear door, where the switch behind the door lock fell off, making the vehicle "think" the door was open. The process to fix it made me have to learn how the alarm worked. That made me decide to bypass it in a way that works better (IMO) and no longer have to deal with the broken bracket.

But now, I don't think these two old vehicles are worth the time for anybody to steal.

-Don- (SSF, CA)

Eric
02-08-2008, 09:50 AM
My 1984 Yamaha Venture got ripped off many years ago and was recovered without the saddlebags, travel trunk, etc.

One thing that can help is to NOT follow instructions on vehicle alarms. Make sure that if the ignition is turned on with the key it will still alarm. Most bike locks can be broken to a working mode (included when forks are locked) in about the same speed as using a key. And when the lock is broken in such a way, the alarm "thinks" the key is being used so there is no alarm sound.

My bike now has the alarm work in such a way that if the same thing is done again, the alarm will sound as I get paged. But I have to remember to do something before I put in the key. Something nobody else would even think about.

I also modified my 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee's alarm in such a way that the keyless entry is the only way to open the door without the alarm sounding. IOW, if the key is used (or if any door key lock is broken) the alarm will still sound. I modified this after I had an alarm problem that kept the interior lights on. That was from a broken switch bracket on the rear door, where the switch behind the door lock fell off, making the vehicle "think" the door was open. The process to fix it made me have to learn how the alarm worked. That made me decide to bypass it in a way that works better (IMO) and no longer have to deal with the broken bracket.

But now, I don't think these two old vehicles are worth the time for anybody to steal.

-Don- (SSF, CA)




Another smart thing to do is rig a "kill switch" someplace hidden that only you know about. There are also ways to lock the wheel(s) so that the bike cannot be rolled. And picking up 500-800 pounds is no easything....

DonTom
02-08-2008, 11:18 AM
"Another smart thing to do is rig a "kill switch" someplace hidden that only you know about."

As long as it's not the type that will run the bike for a half mile or so before it kills the engine. I might be the one to forget!

" There are also ways to lock the wheel(s) so that the bike cannot be rolled. And picking up 500-800 pounds is no easything...."

I own four Kryptonite Locks.

-Don-

chiph
02-08-2008, 11:40 AM
Very interesting stuff; I wonder what the equivalent stats are for the US?

Bike theft is less common here, I think. Might be because there's less opportunity? (Most of us have garages/park indoors - or at least, in a place where the bike is visible while it's sitting.)


A lot of the thefts of MINIs in the UK were ocurring by way of home invasions.

It turns out that the new alarms & immobilizers in cars are so effective, that the easiest way to steal a car would be to have the keys.

And since the keys are conveniently located in the house next to the car, and the homeowners aren't armed (and an attempt to defend your home gets you jailed by the Bobbies) there are a lot of breakins where the car keys are the only things stolen.

Chip H.

Ken
02-08-2008, 03:29 PM
Another smart thing to do is rig a "kill switch" someplace hidden that only you know about. There are also ways to lock the wheel(s) so that the bike cannot be rolled. And picking up 500-800 pounds is no easything....


Weight doesn't seem to be a problem where our thieving fraternity are concerned. They work in a team of four with two short lengths of scaffold pole to pass through the wheels, 'Lift and Away' into the back of a Ford transit. If the alarm goes off - why should they worry, just look at the half interested bystanders and laugh out loud yelling 'This'll teach him to not to lose his keys' and everyone will laugh right back and walk on.

Ken.

chiph
02-08-2008, 08:17 PM
How much trouble would it be to embed a bolt in the concrete, and then chain the frame to it?

Chip H.

Ken
02-09-2008, 06:32 AM
How much trouble would it be to embed a bolt in the concrete, and then chain the frame to it?

Chip H.



Yep!, that is fine at your home but a bit more difficult when away from home. There are many good Ground Anchors on the market but even using them it is still necessary to make sure that they are properly embedded into large concrete blocks and correctly used. The main thing, apart from using the best quality chain and lock you can afford, is to make sure that no part of the chain can touch the ground. It is surprising how brittle and easy to shatter a chain can become after being sprayed with liquid nitrogen then hit with a sledgehammer if it is touching the ground. Ideally, also, when the lock is through the chain the hasp should not be visible.

Ken.

Eric
02-09-2008, 09:49 AM
Another smart thing to do is rig a "kill switch" someplace hidden that only you know about. There are also ways to lock the wheel(s) so that the bike cannot be rolled. And picking up 500-800 pounds is no easything....


Weight doesn't seem to be a problem where our thieving fraternity are concerned. They work in a team of four with two short lengths of scaffold pole to pass through the wheels, 'Lift and Away' into the back of a Ford transit. If the alarm goes off - why should they worry, just look at the half interested bystanders and laugh out loud yelling 'This'll teach him to not to lose his keys' and everyone will laugh right back and walk on.

Ken.


Ugh. Had not thought of that. Clever bastards....

Ken
02-09-2008, 05:00 PM
Another smart thing to do is rig a "kill switch" someplace hidden that only you know about. There are also ways to lock the wheel(s) so that the bike cannot be rolled. And picking up 500-800 pounds is no easything....

Ugh. Had not thought of that. Clever bastards....


I remember, going back some thirty to forty years, having a friend who never let his gas tank go below the half full mark. He maintained he had a spark plug, fully functional and linked to the ignition system, fitted into the tank. He reckoned anyone stealing his car would get their comeuppance when the tank became less than a quarter full. True or not there was no way would I drive that Jag!

Ken.