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Valentine One Radar Detector

Ken
02-26-2008, 11:50 AM
A recent poll by SuperBike magazine (www.superbike.co.uk) asked 'Why was your bike last out of action for any reason?'

The results were surprising, well to me at least, I would have thought own fault crashes should have been much lower and being taken out by other drivers and trackday crashes would have been higher up the list. 10% engine failures was a surprise, I have had one engine failure in 58 years.

1) An own fault crash put 21% out of action.
2) A puncture also put 21% out of action.
3) Electrical faults accounted for 18%.
4) Taken out by another road user sidelined 15% of us.
5) Engine failure took out 10%.
6) A trackday crash caused the tears of 7%.
7) A Snapped chain stopped 4%.
8 ) Brake or suspension failure accounted for 3%
9) A frame or chassis failure eliminated 1%

What put you out of action? Post in and tell us about it and we can see if we get the same sort of results as SuperBike.

Ken.

Dave Brand
02-26-2008, 12:58 PM
Last problem I had was electrical - either the ignition switch or the kill switch, not sure which.

I'd had a few starting problems, but once it was running it was fine; sod's law says that the one time it cut out on the road was, in both time & place, the most inconvenient.

I was on the way to get the MoT done (for furriners, that's the UK annual roadworthiness test) when it cut out halfway out of a T-junction; as the road was on a fairly steep downward slope,I tried to restart using gravity, but that didn't work,so I pulled into a layby. It was turning over normally on the starter, but not firing, so in desperation I flicked the kill switch on & off a few times, then cycled the ignition switch half-a-dozen or so times; fortunately it started at the next attempt!

When I got home I gave both switches a squirt of contact cleaner - that was two years ago & the problem hasn't returned,so I can only assume that there had been a build-up of corrosion on the contacts of one of the switches.

Eric
02-26-2008, 01:22 PM
The last time I had a breakdown was last summer - when a rock or some other piece of debris got kicked up and into my radiator, puncturing it. Luckily, I was very close to the shop where I have the bike serviced - and I just about made it there before the temperature light came on and I had to kill the engine. I rolled it the rest of the way (about 1/4 mile) and $700 later I was back in bidness!

Ken
02-26-2008, 01:59 PM
................. and $700 later I was back in bidness!



quote - OUCH!!!!! - unquote.

Ken.

chiph
02-26-2008, 02:33 PM
Not a bike, but I picked up a screw in a tire the other day.
If the little bugger had been 2mm shorter...

Chip H.

Eric
02-27-2008, 07:19 AM
................. and $700 later I was back in bidness!



quote - OUCH!!!!! - unquote.

Ken.


You said it!

$400 for the radiator; the rest was labor...

Ordinarily, I'd have saved the labor by doing it myself - but I was in a bind. Almost 40 miles from home with a broken down machine. I would have had to call my wife to come get me in our truck, haul the bike home and then fix it. I guess I am getting old - because the hassle just didn't seem worth it to me at the time, esp. since the shop (I buy lots of stuff here and am "tight" with the crew) was extremely obliging and just took my bike in, despite no appointment.

Eric
02-27-2008, 07:21 AM
Not a bike, but I picked up a screw in a tire the other day.
If the little bugger had been 2mm shorter...

Chip H.



With high-speed bike tires, a puncture of any sort means the tire is ruined. Yes, you can repair the hole - but the tire is no longer safe for high-speed riding and must be replaced. A $200 tire can be a "throw away" courtesy of a small screw....

Ken
02-27-2008, 01:07 PM
Not a bike, but I picked up a screw in a tire the other day.
If the little bugger had been 2mm shorter...

Chip H.



With high-speed bike tires, a puncture of any sort means the tire is ruined. Yes, you can repair the hole - but the tire is no longer safe for high-speed riding and must be replaced. A $200 tire can be a "throw away" courtesy of a small screw....


I'm in full agreement there, Eric. If I get a puncture in a bike tyre, (very rare although I did have one early in 2007) or even a split from a stone more than a few millimeters long/deep I scrap the tyre and fit new. I did just that last year with a rear tyre that had only done a few hundred miles as it developed a deep star shaped split, cause unknown, right in the centre of the tread. Damn nuisance as I had just got it nicely scrubbed in at Cadwell Park, no chicken strip and a little fringe of molten rubber round the edges - sadly all that street cred had to go and a new tyre was duly fitted.<gg>

Ken.

Michael
02-27-2008, 09:59 PM
Y'all,

My last breakdown was only a partial, because I was able to limp home. The 1998 Honda VFR Interceptor had a known problem: the regulator/rectifier was known to fail at 25,000 to 30,000 miles and sure enough, with 28,000 miles and after a 10-mile warm-up, the bike wouldn't re-start. No cranking power at all. I bump-started it down a hill and drove home, then had the part replaced with an updated version.

The Honda NT-650 Hawk GT passed 60,000 miles over the weekend and keeps on ticking. There's a bit of oil seepage around one cylinder and the choke cable is stiff, but that's about it for problems.

Compared with the bikes I grew up with, today's bikes are AMAZINGLY reliable. Keep an eye on the fluids, watch for wear on tires, chains, and sprockets, be aware of the feel and sound of things, and they'll go seemingly forever.

Ride safe!
Michael

Eric
02-28-2008, 06:41 AM
"Compared with the bikes I grew up with, today's bikes are AMAZINGLY reliable. Keep an eye on the fluids, watch for wear on tires, chains, and sprockets, be aware of the feel and sound of things, and they'll go seemingly forever. "

This is Pravda (truth)!

They seem to be over-engineered and even more reliable than modern cars, which is really something...

Ken
03-04-2008, 12:24 PM
"Compared with the bikes I grew up with, today's bikes are AMAZINGLY reliable. Keep an eye on the fluids, watch for wear on tires, chains, and sprockets, be aware of the feel and sound of things, and they'll go seemingly forever. "

This is Pravda (truth)!

They seem to be over-engineered and even more reliable than modern cars, which is really something...


Luckily this 'taken for granted' reliability is true but not news, Eric, otherwise we would have had a bit of an oxymoron, as any good Russian would tell you 'There is no Pravda in Izvestia.'

Ken.