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Eric
04-28-2008, 09:42 AM
Other than my recent 64 in a 55 (which will get "disappeared" after I waste a day at VA's "driver improvement" school) I haven't been convicted of a moving violation in about five years now. I actually have plus points on my DMV record - which I consider evidence of divine providence or amazing good fortune. ;D

How about you guys?

And what is your threshold for throttling back on speed - or thinking about fleeing?

I've become sick of paying insurance surcharges and so on; so having even one active ticket on my record (DMV and insurance companies hold them against you for about three years) puts a damper on things for me. And - to be honest about it - I am very tempted to "go for it" when I have the bad luck to pass a cop when I'm doing more than 25 above the posted max. I live in a very rural area, so this os much less risky than it would be in an urban/surburban area. Once I'm out of sight, it's very easy to just vanish down any of the many and endless side roads, or just ditch into the woods and chill out for a while, then sneak back home.

What do you guys think - and do?

Ken
04-28-2008, 10:54 AM
Other than my recent 64 in a 55 (which will get "disappeared" after I waste a day at VA's "driver improvement" school) I haven't been convicted of a moving violation in about five years now. I actually have plus points on my DMV record - which I consider evidence of divine providence or amazing good fortune. ;D

How about you guys?

And what is your threshold for throttling back on speed - or thinking about fleeing?

I've become sick of paying insurance surcharges and so on; so having even one active ticket on my record (DMV and insurance companies hold them against you for about three years) puts a damper on things for me. And - to be honest about it - I am very tempted to "go for it" when I have the bad luck to pass a cop when I'm doing more than 25 above the posted max. I live in a very rural area, so this os much less risky than it would be in an urban/surburban area. Once I'm out of sight, it's very easy to just vanish down any of the many and endless side roads, or just ditch into the woods and chill out for a while, then sneak back home.

What do you guys think - and do?


On any road posted at less than the national limit (70 for motorway/dual carriageway or 60 single lane) I ride and drive at or below the posted speed. On the 60/70 upper limit roads I drive at whatever speed seems appropriate at the time according to weather, road, traffic and visibility conditions. Yesterday, for example, varied between 15-20mph and about 120 tops. I got my licence in 1950 and, touch wood, have never been summoned for any speeding offence and still have a completely clean licence. This is partly due to the fact that I look as far ahead as is possible and as far behind as is possible all the time. (Anyone tailed and stopped by a marked car/bike should be charged with inattention, (failing to keep a good lookout)). Unmarked cars I seem to sense by the way they are driven, especially if the two front occupants are wearing white shirts or dark jackets. I was stopped several times in my twenties but always got away with a 'ticking off'. I think my best excuse back in the days when 'derestricted' meant just that, was, with an innocent look, 'I'm very sorry officer, I thought this road was derestricted.' short pause, 'If I had realised this was a fifty limit do you seriously think I would have ridden past a marked police car at a hundred and ten?' There was a short pause and then 'No probably not sir, please be more aware in future, you may not be so lucky next time.' I had only seen him as I overtook a couple of cars on a fairly clear road, it was too late to slow down so I nailed it. When he pulled out behind me I waited a few seconds, very obviously checking my mirror then, at a clear space, pulled into the left lane and waved him past. When he gonged me I pulled in at once putting on my surprised 'Why did you stop me.' act. I think that was the nearest I ever came to getting booked. The old traffic police were real professionals and, if your driving (speed apart) was to the book you would normally just get a telling off. Reckless, careless, dangerous - you were booked.

Ken.

swamprat
04-28-2008, 11:55 AM
I have had about 19 tickets in my lifetime. Most major tickets were in 55 mph zones. Tickets started dropping off when the speed limits were increased in 1995.

1981- 62-40
1985 69-55 never on record pre DLC (drivers license compact)
1986 71-55 never on record pre DLC
1987 74-55 dismissed via probation
1988 70-55 dismissed via probation
1989 62-45 dismissed via probation
1990 none
1991 47-30 paid; 50-35 never on record pre DLC, 65-55 paid
1992 none
1993 75-65 (was 79-65) reduced via court appearance, pre DLC paid
1994 none
1995 81-65 paid, not on record pre DLC
1996 none
1997 82-70 paid, on record
1998 78-55 paid, reduced in court, on record, 74-65 paid, on record, 51-35 paid, reduced, def adj, not on record
1999 -2003 none
2004 50-35 dismissed, driver school Ajo AZ
2005 86-70 (reduced to 79 roadside) adj witheld in court no points
2006 several seat belt type violations, no speeding, although pulled for 75-55.
2007 none

Had one accident in my lifetime in 1997. Minor fender bender.

SPEEDING TICKETS ARE NO INDICATOR OF ACTUAL DRIVER SAFETY. If they were, ID BE DEAD.

chiph
04-28-2008, 01:59 PM
My run-ins with The Law have been:

- 1985 Written warning for speeding (just got back from Germany, what can I say? Having the parents in the car with me saves me from getting a ticket. Almost wish they hadn't been present, as paying the insurance company would have been easier than hearing about it over and over)

- 1985 Verbal warning for following too close (I-10 in Louisiana, some moron pulled right in front of me when he saw the cop, yet I'm the one who gets the blue light. Military ID saves me)

- 1985 Ticket for seatbelt violation (I-5 near Needles CA. I was really speeding, but the CHP officer changed the offense after seeing the military ID)

- 1993 Ticket for speeding (I-40 in Charlotte, 70 in a 55mph zone, talked magistrate into lowering it to 64 in a 55, which meant the insurance company wasn't called)

Never been at-fault for an accident, but I have had people hit me.

Chip H.

Eric
04-28-2008, 03:18 PM
My run-ins with The Law have been:

- 1985 Written warning for speeding (just got back from Germany, what can I say? Having the parents in the car with me saves me from getting a ticket. Almost wish they hadn't been present, as paying the insurance company would have been easier than hearing about it over and over)

- 1985 Verbal warning for following too close (I-10 in Louisiana, some moron pulled right in front of me when he saw the cop, yet I'm the one who gets the blue light. Military ID saves me)

- 1985 Ticket for seatbelt violation (I-5 near Needles CA. I was really speeding, but the CHP officer changed the offense after seeing the military ID)

- 1993 Ticket for speeding (I-40 in Charlotte, 70 in a 55mph zone, talked magistrate into lowering it to 64 in a 55, which meant the insurance company wasn't called)

Never been at-fault for an accident, but I have had people hit me.

Chip H.



In the '80s I got several (at least three) "reckless driving" cites for doing 76-80 in a 55 (the limit on I-81 and all Va. interstate highways at the time). Really chapped my ass. Today, same road (and more traffic!) and it is highly unlikely you'd even get pulled for 70 or so - which is just a few mph over the new limit of 65 mph. 76 mph would be a minor ticket.

Did the roads suddenly get saaaafer?

Of course not. There's just a bit less bullshit when it comes to highway speed limits now.

Nonetheless, probably hundreds of thousands of people had to pay exorbitant fines and insurance surcharges as a result of all those trumped-up tickets.

It's the same deal on secondary roads, even today - but they still give us the same tires BS about saaaaaafety.

ducky1776
04-30-2008, 10:01 PM
I've gotten 2 tickets in my entire life!

1980 - ticket for not maintaining control of my vehicle for a rearend collision i caused. I was on my honeymoon <g>
1989 - ticket for going 45/35 zone or something like that (I'd just gotten divorced!) I was nice to the policewoman and she didn't charge me the full speed amount.

I'm also the Defensive Driver trainer at work. I asked my boss one day what would happen if I got a ticket, etc (like, they'd have to get someone else who could do it maybe?). Fat chance. I'm stuck with it.

Eric
05-01-2008, 06:52 AM
"I'm also the Defensive Driver trainer at work. I asked my boss one day what would happen if I got a ticket, etc (like, they'd have to get someone else who could do it maybe?). Fat chance. I'm stuck with it."

I'm going to the "school" on May 10 - in order to make a recent speeeeding ticket (64 in a 55) go away. I'm basically agreeing to play patty cake for eight hours and pretend that doing 64 in a 55 was something other than simply driving faster than an under-posted limit that was probably established 25 years ago and which has nothing (as such) to do with safe (or unsafe) driving - in order to prevent the insurance co. from having a BS excuse to raise my rates.


Other than this recent 64 in a 55, I haven't had a ticket in several years; my last accident was in 1987, when I was a dumb college kid and ran off the road in my Camaro and wrecked it.

DonTom
05-06-2008, 08:32 AM
"Military ID saves me"

Back in 1971, just after I got out of the army, I was on my new BMW R-75/5 motorcycle. I was then 21 years old.

I was riding around like I was trying to be an Eric. ;D. That is, several times the speed limit.

A cop stopped me and I gave him my driver's license. It had a bad case of Jungle rot because I had it with me in the Central Highland jungles of Vietnam for a year. The cop did not give me a (deserved) moving violation, but gave me a ticked for a "mutilated driver's license."

To my surprise, this ticket was a hundred bucks (in 1971 money!). I think it was more expensive than the speeding ticket would have been. But at least it wasn't a moving violation.

I assume I could have taken it to court and got off, but I just paid it to get it over with.

-Don-

Eric
05-06-2008, 08:49 AM
"Military ID saves me"

Back in 1971, just after I got out of the army, I was on my new BMW R-75/5 motorcycle. I was then 21 years old.

I was riding around like I was trying to be an Eric. ;D. That is, several times the speed limit.

A cop stopped me and I gave him my driver's license. It had a bad case of Jungle rot because I had it with me in the Central Highland jungles of Vietnam for a year. The cop did not give me a (deserved) moving violation, but gave me a ticked for a "mutilated driver's license."

To my surprise, this ticket was a hundred bucks (in 1971 money!). I think it was more expensive than the speeding ticket would have been. But at least it wasn't a moving violation.

I assume I could have taken it to court and got off, but I just paid it to get it over with.

-Don-


Jeez...

$100 in 1971 dollars is probably close to $500 in today's money... that is an obnoxious fine; what a dick that cop was.

swamprat
05-06-2008, 09:30 AM
I think that $100 in 1971 money is closer to $800 today. In 1971, a candy bar cost $0.15. Today, I saw the candy bars selling for $1.09 in a gas station. Gas was $0.359. Today, it is $3.59. Other items such as clothing (which is most all imported) and TV sets have come down.

Housing is about 10 times the price as well.

Prices have gone up 50 percent in the last 5 years.

DonTom
05-06-2008, 10:57 PM
"that is an obnoxious fine; what a dick that cop was."

I think he thought he was giving me a break. Perhaps he didn't know the fine any more than I did. And I bet if I went to court, they would have dropped it, for the fact that I just got out of the army.

But even then, I had more money than brains.

There were not many places to spend my $350.00 per month (includes $65.00 per month combat pay plus $13.00 over seas pay plus $272.00 in base pay <all tax free>) in the jungles of Vietnam. So almost all of that money got sent home. But I did keep $50.00 per month in case we ever went to a base camp where it is possible to spend some money, But that still leaves $3,600.00 to send home in 1971 money.

BTW, my new 1971 BMW R-75/5 cost me $1,845.00

-Don-

Eric
05-07-2008, 06:22 AM
"that is an obnoxious fine; what a dick that cop was."

I think he thought he was giving me a break. Perhaps he didn't know the fine any more than I did. And I bet if I went to court, they would have dropped it, for the fact that I just got out of the army.

But even then, I had more money than brains.

There were not many places to spend my $350.00 per month (includes $65.00 per month combat pay plus $13.00 over seas pay plus $272.00 in base pay <all tax free>) in the jungles of Vietnam. So almost all of that money got sent home. But I did keep $50.00 per month in case we ever went to a base camp where it is possible to spend some money, But that still leaves $3,600.00 to send home in 1971 money.

BTW, my new 1971 BMW R-75/5 cost me $1,845.00

-Don-


Good times, eh?

(Well, except for the Vietnam part. "F" that. Had I been around/of draft age in them days, I'd have found some way to get out of it. I am all for defending my family, my home, my community - even my country. But the hell with being sent to some pesthole on the other side of the planet to fight a BS war ginned up by a bunch of turkey-necked geeks in Washington whose own asses never get near a combat zone!

DonTom
05-07-2008, 09:25 AM
Vietnam really wasn't all that easy to get out of by 1969, when I was drafted. Moving to Canada was the best way.

BTW, Today was the day I bought my R75/5. I purchased it new on May 7, 1971. 37 years old today.

-Don-

Eric
05-07-2008, 10:09 AM
Vietnam really wasn't all that easy to get out of by 1969, when I was drafted. Moving to Canada was the best way.

BTW, Today was the day I bought my R75/5. I purchased it new on May 7, 1971. 37 years old today.

-Don-


I think I'd have first tried to get some kind of exemption; barring that - and facing having to go to Vietnam - I'd have skeedaddled to Canada. What drives me nuts about guys like The Chimp and Cheney and all the other chickenhawks is that they haven't got the grace, the honesty - the decency - to acknowledge their own lack of enthusiasm to fight and possibly be maimed or killed (and maim or kill total strangers who have done them no harm) and learn from it by not strutting around like complete assholes in their middle and old age, demanding that another generation of youngmen bne sent to do what they chose (reasonably!) to duck.....

ducky1776
05-07-2008, 09:46 PM
OK, I have to poke my beak in here. There is no longer a draft. Everybody in the military today is a volunteer. One of the things we volunteer for is war. We don't set the policy, we just enforce it. If we don't, then you don't get to enjoy the freedoms you have today. I wasn't for going back into Iraq. But the folks in charge said that's where we're going, so as a military person you had better understand that or stay out. I'm tired of hearing about these folks who "joined the military to get a college education." Sorry, the military is a great way to get an education, but to get that, you've got a job to do first. Right now, my best friend's fiance is in the sandbox. I'm terrified for them both. However, I respect that he has made a decision to serve our country. There may be a time when we do need our military right at home. We always hope that never happens. Ever.

Off my soapbox.

DonTom
05-08-2008, 01:02 AM
"I think I'd have first tried to get some kind of exemption; barring that - and facing having to go to Vietnam"

During the large draft calls you had to have a very serious obvious problem to get out of the draft. Even very obvious gays were drafted, and if they said they were gay, they were simply called liars and drafted anyway. Pretty much if you could walk, you could be drafted back then. But moving to Canada seemed like a rather difficult choice to myself and perhaps most people during that time. It was easier to just go and see what happens.

But even back then, you would not know if you would end up in Vietnam and in some cases, even that's not bad. There were many who got sent to Germany then who would volunteer for Vietnam. A lot of it depends on your MOS (military job). Many people in Vietnam never saw any combat. Some parts of Vietnam make most of Hawaii seem like a dump. Many people served in Vietnam in a way much like a civilian job. After work, swim in the warm South China Sea or go get drunk or whatever. And there was no drinking age on basecamps, if you can find an E-6 (Staff Sergent) to buy the booze.

However, I got stuck in the infantry. But that was less than 10% of those who served in Vietnam. And there was even an infantry unit on an island in South Vietnam that has NEVER had any enemy during the entire war. They were only there to make sure it stayed that way. Perhaps some of them got bored to death, however.

But the army is like a box of chocolates. You can never be sure what you will get. However, I got the shaft in every way possible, except for the fact that I got back in one piece.

-Don-

Eric
05-08-2008, 06:53 AM
"But the army is like a box of chocolates. You can never be sure what you will get. However, I got the shaft in every way possible, except for the fact that I got back in one piece."

I'm glad you did!

Seriously - the notion of being placed in a situation where I might be horribly maimed for life, or killed - or be faced with killing some other dude I don't even know for reasons that have nothing to do with my "freedom" (or the security of my country) just makes sick.

And I continue to wish that middle aged and old men warmongers who dodged combat in their time would get suited up in cammo and air dropped right into the center of Sadr City or some such place. Or maybe their daughters and sons, eh? Apparently, fightin' fer freedom is "hard work" - but not suitable for the likes of Jenna Bush.

swamprat
05-08-2008, 07:08 AM
Vietnam and Korea were the biggest sham sales job ever put on the American public. We were fighting communism. They painted a picture that communism would somehow invade our shores. Couple that with what was going on vis a vis the Cold War, and it looked (at least to many) that we needed to do something.

It is hard to say what I would have done back then, as I didn't have any understanding of the constitution nor the founding fathers warnings at the time. It goes back to the public schools... Plus, the vocal protesters were maggot infested hippies and yippies that called our troops baby killers an the like. The silent opponents were families of people killed in combat. They were silent because the media simply blacked them out. There was no decent conservative opposition to the war that I was aware of (except for the John Birch Society).

I may be way off in what I'm saying here, so correct me if I am wrong. I am not saying that I would or would not have tried to evade the draft, but knowing what I do now, you bet your sweet ass that they'd have to pull me out of my house, car, etc to get me to fight in an overseas war.

Eric
05-08-2008, 07:28 AM
Vietnam and Korea were the biggest sham sales job ever put on the American public. We were fighting communism. They painted a picture that communism would somehow invade our shores. Couple that with what was going on vis a vis the Cold War, and it looked (at least to many) that we needed to do something.

It is hard to say what I would have done back then, as I didn't have any understanding of the constitution nor the founding fathers warnings at the time. It goes back to the public schools... Plus, the vocal protesters were maggot infested hippies and yippies that called our troops baby killers an the like. The silent opponents were families of people killed in combat. They were silent because the media simply blacked them out. There was no decent conservative opposition to the war that I was aware of (except for the John Birch Society).

I may be way off in what I'm saying here, so correct me if I am wrong. I am not saying that I would or would not have tried to evade the draft, but knowing what I do now, you bet your sweet ass that they'd have to pull me out of my house, car, etc to get me to fight in an overseas war.




I think, by and large, people were more trusting of the government (and less suspicious of foreign wars).. though the ease with which the Eye-rack BS was purveyed and sold to the masses tends to argue against that!

I' glad I'm too old to be drafted now anyhow (or will be next year!).

However, I'll stand my ground if The Chimp (or Hildebeast or Obama-mamma) ever tries to declare martial law and truck people of to FEMA camps or whatever.