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Thread: Ear protection - what do you use?

  1. #1
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Ear protection - what do you use?

    A couple of weeks or so ago, at the Lincoln BIG Bike Fest I ordered a set of custom moulded earplugs. The master moulds were taken there and then, a quick, simple and painless procedure and delivery was promised (and achieved) in two to three weeks. I think it will take a few tries before I can slip them in as easily as the old 'Max' throwaway protectors I have used up to now. Once fitted, however, the noise attenuation is dramatic although the acoustic modeling allows the transmission of speech frequencies with little attenuation. I had the plugs made in a softer version of the usual material and I must admit they feel very comfortable. Hygiene is simply a matter of wiping them after use with a damp cloth or tissue and then drying them on a clean paper towel. I was finally convinced to buy by the fact that, having had my bike noise tested at my last Cadwell trackday, I was aware that at only 7000rpm the noise level was 95dB's. At 13,000 or so it is way over 100dB's. Another small consideration was that, whereas most firms charge around £70 - £90 for a set of plugs this vendor PLUGZZ (www.plugzz.co.uk) was offering sets to Wolds Bikers club members for £40.

    I shall be trying the earplugs out on the next club ride-out on Monday, all being well, I shall update this thread when I have found out how well they work on-bike.

    Which plugs do you guys use, do you use earplugs at all, if not, why not? - discuss.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  2. #2
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken
    A couple of weeks or so ago, at the Lincoln BIG Bike Fest I ordered a set of custom moulded earplugs. The master moulds were taken there and then, a quick, simple and painless procedure and delivery was promised (and achieved) in two to three weeks. I think it will take a few tries before I can slip them in as easily as the old 'Max' throwaway protectors I have used up to now. Once fitted, however, the noise attenuation is dramatic although the acoustic modeling allows the transmission of speech frequencies with little attenuation. I had the plugs made in a softer version of the usual material and I must admit they feel very comfortable. Hygiene is simply a matter of wiping them after use with a damp cloth or tissue and then drying them on a clean paper towel. I was finally convinced to buy by the fact that, having had my bike noise tested at my last Cadwell trackday, I was aware that at only 7000rpm the noise level was 95dB's. At 13,000 or so it is way over 100dB's. Another small consideration was that, whereas most firms charge around £70 - £90 for a set of plugs this vendor PLUGZZ (www.plugzz.co.uk) was offering sets to Wolds Bikers club members for £40.

    I shall be trying the earplugs out on the next club ride-out on Monday, all being well, I shall update this thread when I have found out how well they work on-bike.

    Which plugs do you guys use, do you use earplugs at all, if not, why not? - discuss.

    Ken.
    One day I will probably regret this, but I rarely use ear protection when riding - unless it's a track day, in which case I just use those el-cheapo disposables...

  3. #3
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken
    A couple of weeks or so ago, at the Lincoln BIG Bike Fest I ordered a set of custom moulded earplugs. The master moulds were taken there and then, a quick, simple and painless procedure and delivery was promised (and achieved) in two to three weeks. I think it will take a few tries before I can slip them in as easily as the old 'Max' throwaway protectors I have used up to now. Once fitted, however, the noise attenuation is dramatic although the acoustic modeling allows the transmission of speech frequencies with little attenuation. I had the plugs made in a softer version of the usual material and I must admit they feel very comfortable. Hygiene is simply a matter of wiping them after use with a damp cloth or tissue and then drying them on a clean paper towel. I was finally convinced to buy by the fact that, having had my bike noise tested at my last Cadwell trackday, I was aware that at only 7000rpm the noise level was 95dB's. At 13,000 or so it is way over 100dB's. Another small consideration was that, whereas most firms charge around £70 - £90 for a set of plugs this vendor PLUGZZ (www.plugzz.co.uk) was offering sets to Wolds Bikers club members for £40.

    I shall be trying the earplugs out on the next club ride-out on Monday, all being well, I shall update this thread when I have found out how well they work on-bike.

    Which plugs do you guys use, do you use earplugs at all, if not, why not? - discuss.

    Ken.
    One day I will probably regret this, but I rarely use ear protection when riding - unless it's a track day, in which case I just use those el-cheapo disposables...
    The 'El Cheapo' disposables do a good job and I have used them ever since they became available more years ago than I care to remember. I am well aware of the danger to hearing of a high noise level environment having spent many hours (with appropriate ear protection) in the Vibration cells of my company's Environmental Facilities. It is quite possible, on a modern four cylinder bike, to cause measurable damage to one's hearing in a single ride.

    Below I've copied a little bit of research info on the subject yoou might find interesting if not worrying.

    Ken.


    The notion that loud music can damage hearing is common
    knowledge, but the noise produced by motorcycles poses similar risk
    to riders, UF experts caution.
    In a pilot test of 33 motorcycles, audiologists at the College of
    Public Health and Health Professions have found nearly half produced
    sounds above 100 decibels when throttled up — equivalent in
    intensity to a loud rock concert or a chainsaw. The ongoing UF effort
    is the first scientific study aimed at producing quantifiable data on
    noise levels for motorcyclists.
    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
    cautions that exposure to noise at 100 decibels is safe for only 15
    minutes. Permanent hearing loss can occur with prolonged exposure
    to any noise measuring 85 decibels or above.
    “Almost all of the motorcycles we tested reached action-level
    noise, which in the workplace would require ear protection,” said Joy
    Colle, one of the study’s researchers in the department of communicative
    disorders. “The loudest bike we tested measured 119 decibels
    with the engine revved, and the recommended exposure time at that
    level is only 11 seconds.”
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  4. #4
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken
    A couple of weeks or so ago, at the Lincoln BIG Bike Fest I ordered a set of custom moulded earplugs. The master moulds were taken there and then, a quick, simple and painless procedure and delivery was promised (and achieved) in two to three weeks. I think it will take a few tries before I can slip them in as easily as the old 'Max' throwaway protectors I have used up to now. Once fitted, however, the noise attenuation is dramatic although the acoustic modeling allows the transmission of speech frequencies with little attenuation. I had the plugs made in a softer version of the usual material and I must admit they feel very comfortable. Hygiene is simply a matter of wiping them after use with a damp cloth or tissue and then drying them on a clean paper towel. I was finally convinced to buy by the fact that, having had my bike noise tested at my last Cadwell trackday, I was aware that at only 7000rpm the noise level was 95dB's. At 13,000 or so it is way over 100dB's. Another small consideration was that, whereas most firms charge around £70 - £90 for a set of plugs this vendor PLUGZZ (www.plugzz.co.uk) was offering sets to Wolds Bikers club members for £40.

    I shall be trying the earplugs out on the next club ride-out on Monday, all being well, I shall update this thread when I have found out how well they work on-bike.

    Which plugs do you guys use, do you use earplugs at all, if not, why not? - discuss.

    Ken.
    One day I will probably regret this, but I rarely use ear protection when riding - unless it's a track day, in which case I just use those el-cheapo disposables...
    The 'El Cheapo' disposables do a good job and I have used them ever since they became available more years ago than I care to remember. I am well aware of the danger to hearing of a high noise level environment having spent many hours (with appropriate ear protection) in the Vibration cells of my company's Environmental Facilities. It is quite possible, on a modern four cylinder bike, to cause measurable damage to one's hearing in a single ride.

    Below I've copied a little bit of research info on the subject yoou might find interesting if not worrying.

    Ken.


    The notion that loud music can damage hearing is common
    knowledge, but the noise produced by motorcycles poses similar risk
    to riders, UF experts caution.
    In a pilot test of 33 motorcycles, audiologists at the College of
    Public Health and Health Professions have found nearly half produced
    sounds above 100 decibels when throttled up — equivalent in
    intensity to a loud rock concert or a chainsaw. The ongoing UF effort
    is the first scientific study aimed at producing quantifiable data on
    noise levels for motorcyclists.
    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
    cautions that exposure to noise at 100 decibels is safe for only 15
    minutes. Permanent hearing loss can occur with prolonged exposure
    to any noise measuring 85 decibels or above.
    “Almost all of the motorcycles we tested reached action-level
    noise, which in the workplace would require ear protection,” said Joy
    Colle, one of the study’s researchers in the department of communicative
    disorders. “The loudest bike we tested measured 119 decibels
    with the engine revved, and the recommended exposure time at that
    level is only 11 seconds.”
    Thanks, Ken! Good info....

    Esp., if you're running a pretty aggressive Muzzy exhaust!

  5. #5
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Esp., if you're running a pretty aggressive Muzzy exhaust
    Defo if running a Muzzy, Akrapovic, also Yoshi, Akra, Arrow, Akra, Scorpion, Yoshi, Muzzy, Scorpion, Devil, Akra, Muzzy, ................... get the drift? Listen to these words, if you can't hear them your ears are already going .... Don't ride without protection - now where have I heard those words before? I seem to remember it was good advice. ........ :-[

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  6. #6
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Well, I don't know what has happened but;

    a) It is the third Monday in the month.

    b) a) Means it is a club ride-out night.

    c) It has not rained all day.

    d) The weather man says no rain this evening.

    e) Taking a), b), c), and d) into consideration, I must be dreaming.

    The bike is out and prepped, my gear is laid out ready and it looks as though I will be trying out my new custom ear-plugs this evening.

    Watch this space.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  7. #7
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Not sure if they'd be good for noise suppression in a constantly noisy environment like a bike, but they work well when shooting:

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con...RR_33__50_pack

    Chip H.

    Former owner: 2012 Honda Civic LX, 2006 Honda Ridgeline RTL, 2000 Honda CR-V EX, 2003 MINI Cooper S, 1992 Honda Accord LX, 1999 Mercedes ML-320, 1995 VW Jetta GLX, 1991 Mercury Capri XR2, 1981 Mercury Zephyr, 1975 Chevrolet Impala

  8. #8
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by chiph
    Not sure if they'd be good for noise suppression in a constantly noisy environment like a bike, but they work well when shooting:

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con...RR_33__50_pack

    Chip H.
    The Orange MAX plugs were always my favourite plugs, they were perfect for my ears, but for some reason I have not been able to get any for about a year now and my stock has virtually run out - only one pair left. No one seems to stock them which was one of the main reasons for getting the custom ones made. The available alternative 'disposables' are useless as far as my ears are concerned, they will not fit properly no matter how I put them in.

    My new custom plugs work well, when I can get the damn things fitted properly. There is a definite knack to inserting them and, of the people who bought them at the BIG Bike Fest, as I did, I am not the only one finding them difficult to fit. For the first part of the club ride mine were snugly in my pocket as, when it was time to lead my group out I still hadn't managed to insert them correctly. At the mid-way stop I managed to fit them, more or less, and they worked OK. Leaving the clubhouse later, to come home, I thought, 'I wonder if moistening them might help' - instant success. Hopefully after a few times we will all get the knack of using our plugs as when properly inserted they are GOOD!.

    Major embarrassment - guess which group leader missed a turn off and had to stop his group further up the road and get them all to U-Turn. :-[

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Kwozzie1's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    I plead guilty ........to not wearing any. ......that is untli earlier this week. I planned a quick trip out back two up, with a visiting Kiwi friend...He has a 04 Ducati 1000 DS. He said I should wear ear protection and wow what a difference. FOr AUD 0.95 the difference when the wind noise goes is great.
    Much less tiring on 600-700km ride

    The Laser Ligheplugs are mde inthe USA by Howard Leight

    http://www.howardleight.com/
    Rex
    On the Sunshine Coast, in the Sunshine State Queensland (QLD), Australia

  10. #10
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: Ear protection - what do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kwozzie1
    I plead guilty ........to not wearing any. ......that is untli earlier this week. I planned a quick trip out back two up, with a visiting Kiwi friend...He has a 04 Ducati 1000 DS. He said I should wear ear protection and wow what a difference. FOr AUD 0.95 the difference when the wind noise goes is great.
    Much less tiring on 600-700km ride

    The Laser Ligheplugs are mde inthe USA by Howard Leight

    http://www.howardleight.com/
    Thanks, Kwozzie. Maybe that is the reason I can't get them over here from my usual suppliers, there could be a US/UK supply delay/problem. The Howard Leight 'MAX' plugs are far and away the best for me. I've had a look on the 'net and found a couple more commercial suppliers of HL products in the UK. I might try them on Monday and see if they have any in stock.

    Thanks again.

    Ken.

    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

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