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Thread: my Jeep repairs . . .

  1. #21
    DonTom
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    "Actually, today's cars are - in general - much more powerful. 300 and 400 horsepower (real hp) is common"

    I didn't realize such was all that common these days where most people seem to be driving a small four cylinder. Even my 1.9L (116 CID) Saturn has a larger engine than many others.

    In the 1970's. I remember a lot of cars had engines larger than 6.6L (400 CID). Not many cars these days have engines that large, do they?

    I know they can now get more HP out of smaller engines, but that much more?

    -Don-

  2. #22
    Purceld2
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Hi Don,

    I have been try to contact you regarding totally disabling the Alarm and immobiliser on my RHD JGC. i live in London England. and today tried your instructions of disconnecting the c3 connector from the BCM. but there is a mass of wires down there and i do not wish to disconnect the wrong one, any tips on how to locate the C-3 connector which needs to be disconnected from the BCM.

    Your help will be much appreciated

    regards

    Desmond

  3. #23
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Purceld2
    Hi Don,

    I have been try to contact you regarding totally disabling the Alarm and immobiliser on my RHD JGC. i live in London England. and today tried your instructions of disconnecting the c3 connector from the BCM. but there is a mass of wires down there and i do not wish to disconnect the wrong one, any tips on how to locate the C-3 connector which needs to be disconnected from the BCM.

    Your help will be much appreciated

    regards

    Desmond
    Purely as a not of caution, one might wonderwhy someone living in London, one of the UKs auto theft capitals, would want to completely disable their alarm system. Perhaps Desmond could explain a little further?

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  4. #24
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    "I have been try to contact you regarding totally disabling the Alarm and immobiliser on my RHD JGC."

    I am now at work. I will have to look at the service manual and / or my Jeep when I get home. I can now only remember that it's left of the steering column (inside car) next to many other connectors that look the same.

    But C-3 will be the only connector with a violet / yellow wire on pin 10.

    But why do you wish to disable the alarm?

    -Don-

  5. #25
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom
    "Actually, today's cars are - in general - much more powerful. 300 and 400 horsepower (real hp) is common"

    I didn't realize such was all that common these days where most people seem to be driving a small four cylinder. Even my 1.9L (116 CID) Saturn has a larger engine than many others.

    In the 1970's. I remember a lot of cars had engines larger than 6.6L (400 CID). Not many cars these days have engines that large, do they?

    I know they can now get more HP out of smaller engines, but that much more?

    -Don-
    Engines were much larger then, but produced far less power. For example, my 1976 Trans-Am's 455 was rated at just 200 net hp. This from a 7.4 liter V-8! Today, the Mustang GT's 4.6 liter V-8 makes 300 net hp - 100 more hp from an engine that is almost 3 liters smaller!

    Most of today's econo-car engines are in the 1.5-1.8 liter range - and typically make at least 105-110 hp. Most mid-size cars today have V-6s in the 3.0-3.8 liter range with (typically) at least 220-250 hp. (The current Taurus has 265 hp; the Camry, 270).



  6. #26
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Desmond, (Ken, Desmond explained his reasons via E-mail).

    Look in front of driver's seat, left of the diagnostic connector, near the door, near the hood release. There is a small pop-out cover (no screws, just those cheap black plastic thingies) to remove. Under that cover, you will see a BLACK connector most towards you on the extreme left. This is C-3 and will have violet-yellow wire on right side, closest to you.

    Pull this connector out and see if your problems are gone. This completes the job. No tools required for this job.

    Your alarm will appear to still work as the light on the dashboard will still function, but that's all that will work in the alarm system. This is nice, because it will look as if it's set.

    Another option, but only if your interior lights do NOT time out, which drains your battery, and you still wish your alarm to still work, you can put the connector back in and cut the violet-yellow wire. From then on, you can no longer use a key for any door or you will get an alarm. You must use the remote (aka, keyless entry). If you do not have any remotes, this paragraph is not an option. This will only fix a problem with an intermittent key lock switch, such as I had, on the rear key lock where the switch fell off the bracket behind the key hole.

    -Don-

  7. #27
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    "Engines were much larger then, but produced far less power. For example, my 1976 Trans-Am's 455 was rated at just 200 net hp. This from a 7.4 liter V-8! Today, the Mustang GT's 4.6 liter V-8 makes 300 net hp - 100 more hp from an engine that is almost 3 liters smaller!"

    I had no idea the differences were that great. I am not a performance nut so I do not keep up with such stuff. But do they manage to increase the torque too or was there a trade off where the new engines have less torque than the old?

    -Don-

  8. #28
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom
    "Engines were much larger then, but produced far less power. For example, my 1976 Trans-Am's 455 was rated at just 200 net hp. This from a 7.4 liter V-8! Today, the Mustang GT's 4.6 liter V-8 makes 300 net hp - 100 more hp from an engine that is almost 3 liters smaller!"

    I had no idea the differences were that great. I am not a performance nut so I do not keep up with such stuff. But do they manage to increase the torque too or was there a trade off where the new engines have less torque than the old?

    -Don-
    You're right, torque is down (generally) because today's engines are (generally) smaller displacement. A big V-8 will (usually) produce more torque (and at lower RPM) than a smaller one. So, as an example, even though the 455 in my Trans-Am doesn't make nearly as much power as the new Corvette's 6.2 liter V-8, it still makes as much or more torque.

    One complaint about the new Mustang's 4.6 liter V-8 is that it lacks the "bottom end" (torque) the old 5.0 V-8 had....

  9. #29
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Desmond,

    Since your steering wheel is on the wrong side of the car, my instructions of left of the diagnostic connector might not be correct. Perhaps it will be on the right side of the Jeeps in England. But look for a small cover that snaps in and out of the underside of the dash. It should be fairly easy to find, and C-3 should be the black connector closest to the driver. If it will be on the right or left side of the Jeeps in England, I do not know. But look for the Violet-yellow wire on one corner of the connector to make sure you have C-3.

    -Don-

  10. #30
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Desmond,

    I just took a close look at my Jeep. The cover that you need to remove actually goes around the Data Link (diagnostic or DTC) connector, which is right above the brake pedal (at least in the USA).

    -Don-

  11. #31
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Today, I decided to take one spark plug out of my Jeep to decide if I want to change all the plugs and other stuff. I never changed the plugs in this Jeep since I owned it. I purchased it used about four or five years ago (which is only about 22,000 miles ago). It's obvious the plugs have been changed before (because of the brand name) and they looked fine. Seems no need to do a tune up quite yet.

    But the type of plugs in there are :

    "Mighty Power Tip GRP33"

    Anybody here ever hear of such a spark plug?

    Also, in Jeep, & Dodge trucks, they put the distributor dead center behind the engine (5.2L) where it seems to be impossible to reach from anywhere. What's the trick to get to it to be able to replace the distributor cap & rotor?

    -Don-(SSF, CA)

  12. #32
    Senior Member
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    You only need to tune up the vehicle and change the plugs every 50,000 miles on the 5.2 liter in the 1st gen Grand Cherokee. So if the plug you took off looks good and it runs well and the timing is in the good zone - no need to make changes. I replaced the cap and rotor about 10 years ago on mine along with replacing all the spark plugs and spark plug wires at the same time. It was tough job. I can't remember how I got the distributor cap off as I recall I loosened two screws (one on either side) and lifted the cap out at an angle and it came off. I remember I also used a flash light to see in there, since that area is dark since its hidden under the metal frame rail above it. I'll check the shop manual and see if there are any special tips for getting the distributor out. The one thing I do remember about the job is the metal tubes around the spark plugs were a pain. Make sure you use a rubber hose on the spark plug (when you put it back on) to turn it back into the threads. After the spark plugs turns few times around then you can use the torque wrench to tighten them to factory settings.

    BTW, AC Rapidfire spark plugs really add some punch to the 5.2 liter best plugs I ever had in my 5.2. Gas mileage improved to after installing them. If you use them no need to gap them, they are pre-gapped from the factory.

  13. #33
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    "You only need to tune up the vehicle and change the plugs every 50,000 miles on the 5.2 liter in the 1st gen Grand Cherokee. "

    My 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee Factory Service Manual says every 60,000 miles. And that's almost twice as often as my 2002 Ford Mustang that say every 110,000 miles.

    "I'll check the shop manual and see if there are any special tips for getting the distributor out."

    No chance. I've notice the more difficult a routine job is, the less likely they will give a hint of how to do it. It's like they don't want to admit to it in writing. A good example is my 1997 Sebring. I have every service manual possible for it. How do you remove the rear spark plugs? Not a word about it any where. The front plugs are in the clear. To get to the rear plugs, the first step is to remove the upper intake manifold and all the other stuff in the way. That's better than the 1996 Carmaro that Tom used to drive. Want to remove the six spark plugs? First step is to remove the engine from the vehicle. You think you will find that in the service manual?

    I think I can get the distributor cap out of the Jeep with some hassle. My Dodge pickup truck is a lot worse because it's a lot wider. With the truck, I did not even try. Hopefully the distributor cap & rotor can last the life of the vehicle. Otherwise, I will have to find a way to sit or lay down at the far end dead center on top of the engine compartment. I wonder how the dealer would do this job.

    But there is some good news with my 97 Jeep. Those metal tube thingies around the plugs easily come off with the wires. But I know what you're talking about because they were a big hassle in my 99 Dodge truck which also has a 5.2L. I don't know why my Jeep 5/2L is so different. Removing the spark plugs in the Jeep look to be very easy. All eight of them, unlike my truck where it took me over an hour to get the one removed that's just under the large brake booster for the master cylinder. And I have tons of all types of weird tools for such jobs. It would have been easiest to remove the master cylinder to get that one plug out, but I didn't do that.


    "BTW, AC Rapidfire spark plugs really add some punch to the 5.2 liter best plugs I ever had in my 5.2. Gas mileage improved to after installing them. If you use them no need to gap them, they are pre-gapped from the factory."

    Perhaps you had a bad plug before. I somehow doubt you can notice a big difference versus good stock plugs.

    Look at this poll asking hot rodders how the plugs compare:

    http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/ac-regular-vs-ac-platinum-vs-ac-rapidfire-plugs-49013.html


    -Don-

  14. #34
    Senior Member
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    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    Notice how the test is "What's best for the dollar?" not what is the best performing spark plug. Rapidfires are expensive. To the "Charlie Cheepo" who wants to save money up front, going with the standard AC sparkplugs always wins out. However performance is better with the Rapidfires. I have tried them in several different cars over the years. I did a test years ago on a 2.8 liter MPI Pontiac 6000 with new AC sparkplugs vs. AC Rapidfires. You could feel the difference with the Rapidfires they had a better throttle response (entire rpm range) and the gas mileage was about 1 mpg better on the highway with them. In the long term the Rapidfires save you money and give you more performance. If you look at the spark plug design the Rapidfire plug has much larger current than the stock AC plugs and the more current you have the more power the engine is going to produce. AC Rapidfires were originally designed for use in racing and later released to the public. Both my T/As have Rapidfires in them right now and they perform better with them than the stock plugs.


  15. #35
    DonTom
    Guest

    Re: my Jeep repairs . . .

    "Notice how the test is "What's best for the dollar?" "

    I did notice. These days, the best for the dollar will be the plugs that give the best MPG!

    But I will try a set or two of the rapid fires (I couldn't care less that they cost more, they are supposed to last 100K miles anyway) when I change the plugs in my Jeep.

    I might change them soon just because they look very easy to change, even though the one plug I took out to check looked fine.

    Also, I need to check the plugs in my 96 Saturn. It's got 90K miles on it and I don't think they have ever been changed. I will try the rapidFires there too.

    I also need to check the brakes in the Saturn, which I will do soon.

    -Don-





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