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Thread: Oil in there

  1. #21
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    I happen to know the rear main bearing oil seal is slowly leaking on my 76 Chevy V8. It has been leaking for a number of years (read 3-4 yrs.) Before, I used to replenish oil every 6-7 weeks, and now I do that every 4 weeks. That's how slow it's leaking. Is there a remote chance the seal will some day crumble or disintegrate completely and I will have a massive oil leaking going down the road.

    Any comments?


    ChevyMan

  2. #22
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Just black RTV, mostly on curved areas.

    $40 is a lot for those. All depends who you purchase them from.
    RTV direct on the rubber gasket or only on the metal? So far, I have only used oil on rubber gaskets. This thin little rubber gasket fits in a small grove in the oil pan.

    The $40.00 (or more) price seems to be everywhere, even on-line. The SOHC is only about $13.00 for the gasket set, but I have the DOHC which is a bit more than $40.00.

    -Don-

  3. #23
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    Is there a remote chance the seal will some day crumble or disintegrate completely and I will have a massive oil leaking going down the road.

    IMO, with an oil leak anything can happen. It's usually gets a bit worse with age but it's possible that it will even stop leaking. I have heard stories where changing the type of oil makes a difference.

    But IMO, the worse it will probably get is that you will have to add a quart of oil every day you drive it, unless it's from loose bolts or something like that. Then you can lose all your oil very fast.

    I once owned a 71 Chevy (307) that ATE (did not leak) a quart of engine oil every 100 miles or so. This was right after a valve job was done on a very old engine. It must have been getting by the old worn oil rings. But it ran great!

    -Don-

  4. #24
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    I have 10W30 in my '76 Chevy now. Previously I used SAE-30 as recommended when the car was new. With bearing oil seals now slowly leaking, would it be better to use SAE-40 ? Pro and con comments please.

    ChevyMan

  5. #25
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    I have 10W30 in my '76 Chevy now. Previously I used SAE-30 as recommended when the car was new. With bearing oil seals now slowly leaking, would it be better to use SAE-40 ? Pro and con comments please.

    ChevyMan
    How many miles are on the engine?

    If it's low or you think there may be a lot more life in it, you might just want to replace the front and rear seals and keep on keeping on with the SAE-30.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  6. #26
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    With bearing oil seals now slowly leaking, would it be better to use SAE-40 ? Pro and con comments please.
    ChevyMan
    IMO, most likely you will notice no difference at all when changing from 30W to 40W. It might make a slight difference, but too small to notice. Same with all those additives on the market that claim to stop leaks.

    I have had my share of cars that leaked engine oil and I've tried everything except for fixing it the correct way.

    -Don-

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    How many miles are on the engine?

    If it's low or you think there may be a lot more life in it, you might just want to replace the front and rear seals and keep on keeping on with the SAE-30.
    Have 53K on the odometer.Will cost me over 300 bucks to repair the leak. How many cans of oil can I buy for $300?

    Chevyman

  8. #28
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    53K on the motor, eh! That unit is just barely broken in. I would fork out the money and fix it proper, then call it a day. Later down the road, say when you have 200k on the motor, you will be happy you fixed it!

    I always find when I Mickey Mouse with something, it Mickey Mouses with me when I least expect it.

    A better question would be how many engines can you buy for $300 bucks if you forgo the repair until you have a catastrophic leak going down the highway and burn up your main bearings. Won't take long running on no oil at highway rpms to end the engine's life.

    Then again maybe you have a calculated leak, the kind that keeps you from ever having to do an oil change. If you are confident with that, just add the quart it asks for every month and change the filter a couple times a year.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  9. #29
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    I have 10W30 in my '76 Chevy now. Previously I used SAE-30 as recommended when the car was new. With bearing oil seals now slowly leaking, would it be better to use SAE-40 ? Pro and con comments please.

    ChevyMan
    Hi Larry,

    These leaks (on '70s-era GM V-8s) are common and, indeed, fairly characterized as "normal." I would adopt a watch and wait strategy, since (as I recall) you don't drive this vehicle extensively. Just check underneath the car before you start her up (to look for unusual/increase leaks/puddles) and check the oil level on the dipstick once a week - and top as necessary.

    You might also go down to your local GM dealer (any brand of GM) and ask whether they still sell a seal conditioner oil additive. GM used to make/market a product that would help make seals in older cars less brittle/leaky. You just added the can of additive to the crankcase.

  10. #30
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    IMO, most likely you will notice no difference at all when changing from 30W to 40W. It might make a slight difference, but too small to notice. Same with all those additives on the market that claim to stop leaks.

    I have had my share of cars that leaked engine oil and I've tried everything except for fixing it the correct way.

    -Don-
    On oil: I think you need to use a multi-viscosity oil, either 10W-30 or 10W40. A "straight" 30 or 40 weight is probably not a good idea, for a variety of reasons. One is such oil may not be current, as far as SAE/API standards. The other is if you live in an area with temps. close to or near freezing, a straight 40 weight oil is going to be super thick and harder on your engine during cold start and may shorten its life...
    Last edited by Eric; 12-04-2008 at 07:07 PM.

  11. #31
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    Eric:
    >>>Check underneath the car before you start her up [-------------] and check
    the oil level on the dipstick once a week and top as necessary.<<


    I always check the dipstick 2-3 times a week BEFORE starting the car. The level is always either on near "full" mark, or about 3/16 in. below the full mark, then I top it. When I move the car, there always are three or four puddles of oil anywhere from an inch to about 5 inch in diameter, without running. Don't know how much is leaking while the car is in motion, though.

    Chevyman

  12. #32
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    Eric:
    >>>Check underneath the car before you start her up [-------------] and check
    the oil level on the dipstick once a week and top as necessary.<<


    I always check the dipstick 2-3 times a week BEFORE starting the car. The level is always either on near "full" mark, or about 3/16 in. below the full mark, then I top it. When I move the car, there always are three or four puddles of oil anywhere from an inch to about 5 inch in diameter, without running. Don't know how much is leaking while the car is in motion, though.

    Chevyman

    It sounds like it's relatively minor - and so long as you are vigilant about checking frequently, I see no real reason not to just "drive on."

    In your situation - older car; not worth all that much and used lightly - I'd be reluctant to spend large amounts of money on fixes unless absolutely necessary to keep the car reliable, roadworthy and safe, etc.

    PS: Did you see my other post about the GM oil additive? If it's available, might be worth trying...

  13. #33
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    GM used to make/market a product that would help make seals in older cars less brittle/leaky. You just added the can of additive to the crankcase.
    Have you tried it? And if so, did it work? I have yet to hear of such a "fix" actually doing much of anything.

    -Don-

  14. #34
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    On oil: I think you need to use a multi-viscosity oil, either 10W-30 or 10W40. A "straight" 30 or 40 weight is probably not a good idea, for a variety of reasons. One is such oil may not be current, as far as SAE/API standards. The other is if you live in an area with temps. close to or near freezing, a straight 40 weight oil is going to be super thick and harder on your engine during cold start and may shorten its life...
    I agree. If a car leaks engine oil don't try to do anything or change anything other than have it fixed the correct way. And listen to what I say, not to what I have done myself!.

    -Don-

  15. #35
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    Have 53K on the odometer.Will cost me over 300 bucks to repair the leak. How many cans of oil can I buy for $300?
    Chevyman

    Only $300.00 bucks? Seems cheap to fix a leak the correct way, especially for there in HI.

    -Don-


  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Only $300.00 bucks? Seems cheap to fix a leak the correct way, especially for there in HI.

    -Don-

    That $300 is NOT a quote nor an estimate from anyone. It could be actually more. That figure was just my guess, is all (BG)

    Larry

  17. #37
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    ***PS Did you see------***

    I tried to see if my local NAPA store might carry any leak additives but it was closed. Will try again tomorrow. If not will try a GM dealer as you suggested, Eric.

    Larry

  18. #38
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Have you tried it? And if so, did it work? I have yet to hear of such a "fix" actually doing much of anything.

    -Don-
    This was/is a GM product, so I doubt it's snake oil. I forget exactly what was in it, but the product contained additives that crutched older/brittle seals by making them a bit more pliable, thereby slowing down leaks such as Larry's dealing with.

  19. #39
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Adachi View Post
    That $300 is NOT a quote nor an estimate from anyone. It could be actually more. That figure was just my guess, is all (BG)

    Larry
    It's probably close.

    Dropping the pan in your small block/'70s-era Chevy is not that much of an ordeal.

    But if you can avoid it for awhile - maybe, forever - then it's worth giving it a shot.....

  20. #40
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    It's probably close.

    Dropping the pan in your small block/'70s-era Chevy is not that much of an ordeal.

    But if you can avoid it for awhile - maybe, forever - then it's worth giving it a shot.....
    What makes you assume the oil pan is the problem?

    -Don-

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