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Thread: Changing tires in big fat RV's

  1. #1
    DonTom
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    Changing tires in big fat RV's

    I am going to carry all the stuff required to change my own tires in my 24 foot RV which probably has a total weight of about 12,000 lbs.

    Tires need to be filled to about 80 PSI and I don't want it to take all day.

    Does anybody have any suggestions for a good 120 VAC air compressor and a good tire jack (not too heavy, if possible) to take along in this rig?

    -Don-

  2. #2
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    I am going to carry all the stuff required to change my own tires in my 24 foot RV which probably has a total weight of about 12,000 lbs.

    Tires need to be filled to about 80 PSI and I don't want it to take all day.

    Does anybody have any suggestions for a good 120 VAC air compressor and a good tire jack (not too heavy, if possible) to take along in this rig?

    -Don-
    I bet Sears has just what you're looking for; lookee here:

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_02871488000P

    Note that it also has jumper cables and a power inverter!
    Last edited by Eric; 02-04-2009 at 07:19 AM.

  3. #3
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    I bet Sears has just what you're looking for; lookee here:

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_02871488000P

    Note that it also has jumper cables and a power inverter!

    Don't need any of that stuff. There are countless ways in this RV to get going on a dead battery. It even has a switch to add the coach batteries to the starter battery for starting. And I already have several power inverters, not to mention a 3,600 watt gasoline generator in the RV that comes on from a flick of a switch (and runs from my fuel tank).

    Let me give you a quick lesson on decent air compressors (such as those that can feel a truck tire in minutes instead of hours).

    A decent tankless air compressor costs at least a hundred bucks. Runs on 120 VAC only and does nothing else. I have one that I really like but it has been discontinued. I want another one for the RV, but I know of none others as good as this that are made today.

    Look at this Campbell Hausfeld Standard Duty Air Compressor
    Model MT300009


    I already own one, but want another just like it , if possible for the RV. I will write that guy, even though he can keep all the brushes as I want it only for tires.

    Any decent air compressor has a rating in CFM at 90 psi, such as the one above. A hundred bucks is about as cheap as they are made. Seems all the better air compressors today come with a tank, which I do NOT want.

    Most of these better compressors only spec to 100 psi, but usually will do 110 psi. A lot of junky air compressors will claim 275 psi but will burn out before they get there if left on until then. These never have a CFM rating. Especially not at 90 psi!

    These more expensive air compressors when set for a PSI cannot overfill, but will NOT shut off and can be left on all week. If it's set for 80 psi, it will fill to 80 psi and then leak air out to keep it at 80 psi, even if not a perfect connection to the valve stem. IOW, you can have a flat, connect up the air compressor, set it for 80 psi and then go make dinner or something and it will have 80 psi in the tire no matter when you return, even if there's a small leak.

    BTW, I think I purchased my MT300009 at Sears, but that was more than ten years ago. I know it cost a hundred bucks. I don't know why nobody makes any decent tankless air compressors any more.

    But for a tire jack, how does this jack look for a 12,000 LB RV for lifing for a flat tire? This is what I am thinking about buying for a jack.

    -Don- San Francisco
    Last edited by DonTom; 02-04-2009 at 08:20 AM.

  4. #4
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Good to know!

    I actually have that jack - just not the fancy aluminum version.

  5. #5
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Good to know!

    I actually have that jack - just not the fancy aluminum version.

    How much does it weight? In my old age, I can only lift the aluminum versions of 6,000 lbs floor jacks!

    IMAO, There should be senior discounts on these!

    -Don-

  6. #6
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post

    How much does it weight? In my old age, I can only lift the aluminum versions of 6,000 lbs floor jacks!

    IMAO, There should be senior discounts on these!

    -Don-
    I think about 50 pounds; not too obnoxiously heavy but enough that it does take some manhandling.

    But it gets my 4,000 pound Pontiac up in the air like it was made of Swiss cheese!

  7. #7
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    I think about 50 pounds; not too obnoxiously heavy but enough that it does take some manhandling.

    But it gets my 4,000 pound Pontiac up in the air like it was made of Swiss cheese!
    Are you sure yours is a six thousand lb floor jack?

    Even the a
    luminum version weights 66 lbs!

    -Don-

  8. #8
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Are you sure yours is a six thousand lb floor jack?

    Even the a
    luminum version weights 66 lbs!

    -Don-

    Yep!

    I guess it must weigh more. My perspective is skewed because as a pretty serious weightlifter stuff that feels pretty light/manageable to me is really heavy to normal people!

  9. #9
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Shoot, I would get like a 20 gallon air compressor and some pneumatic power tools. No messing about on the side of the road at all. Changing your own tires would be nothing more than a NASCAR pit stop. I am assuming you have plenty of storage space in that unit to put a compressor.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  10. #10
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Shoot, I would get like a 20 gallon air compressor and some pneumatic power tools. No messing about on the side of the road at all. Changing your own tires would be nothing more than a NASCAR pit stop. I am assuming you have plenty of storage space in that unit to put a compressor.

    It has a lot of storage space, both inside and out. For an example, under the rear bed there is a wood cover. Under that wood cover it's all storage space that I can get to from outside the RV. I carry dollies, tool boxes and a lot more in that space alone. Much more spaces all around. And items such as the generator has it's own compartment.

    I could easily fit a 20 gallon air compressor back there, but I want a good (hundred bucks plus) tankless one, if I can find one. I don't know why they all come with air tanks these days. I like the air tank to be separate from the compressor at home, and prefer no air tank at all for the one in the RV. The RV has AC outlets even on the outside on both sides so I can run a air compressor from the generator with a an AC cord that's not too long. Who needs an air tank for that?

    I already have several impact wrenches (both AC & DC) that I can remove the tire bolts with. Don't need air there either. The generator in this RV probably has more power than this house! So I might have to run the generator on the side of the road to make it easy to remove the tires. Not a big deal. I get 3,500 watts of 120 VAC by a flick of a switch in the middle of nowhere. And the 100% duty cycle generator runs direct from the vehicle's 55 gallon gasoline tank.

    -Don- (Reno)

  11. #11
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    The way you describe it makes me want an RV too!

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  12. #12
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    The way you describe it makes me want an RV too!
    It should have almost all the features of your home, sometimes even more so. Even central heating is the norm in these RVs. And almost everything works on 12VDC & or propane, even the refrigerator and freezer. Large true deep cycle batteries ($400.00 worth) run everything electric when boondocking (running self contained) except for the coach air conditioning and microwave oven. For the coach A/C the generator must be used, but the microwave oven will work okay on a large inverter if you cannot make any noise. But there's also a regular oven and stove. So the only thing the generator is really needed for is full coach air conditioning when out in the middle of nowhere.

    The generator is designed to be ran full time if necessary.

    I don't know why I thought my generator was only 3,500 watts. I just looked at the spec. of my Onan MicroQuiet 4000. The 120 VAC output is rated for 33.3 amps continuous duty. That's 120 VAC times 33.3 amps= 3996 VA or watts.

    So it's not 3,500 watts but 4,000 watts. I am now getting ready to change the oil in the generator.

    No matter what the generator is used for the deep cycle batteries get charged by it too. And there's even an emergency switch to add the coach batteries in on the 12 volt starter for the 7.4 L RV engine, so it's not possible to be left with a dead starting battery. Seems they thought of everything in the design. Also, of course, the batteries get charged automatically when you're plugged in at a RV park.

    Unlike a motorcycle. The RV is just like taking your entire home with you except the water heater in small RV's like mine are only six gallons so showers must be short. Also, mine has no clothes washer and dryer, but larger RV's do. And some of them have tankless water heaters that NEVER run out of hot water. Mine holds 60 gallons of water. Larger RV's hold more, of course.

    When at a RV park with full hookups, then you use their water and electricity. Even TV cable and often wireless internet. A lot of RV's these days use satellite internet and TV. Mine has a satellite dish on top, but I probably won't use it. If I were a full-timer, than that type of stuff would be a must.

    -Don- (Reno)

  13. #13
    DonTom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Yep!

    I guess it must weigh more. My perspective is skewed because as a pretty serious weightlifter stuff that feels pretty light/manageable to me is really heavy to normal people!
    Perhaps not by much! I just weighed my old 3 ton jack. It's solid cast iron and very well built (even though it's made in China!). It only weights 72 lbs. That's only six lbs more than the aluminum one that costs three times the price.

    But this jack's contact pad (or whatever it's called) is almost five inches in diameter. It worked well for my old RV, but with my newer RV there's less than 5 inches of clear space between the spring bracket and the shock bracket on the rear axle. This round "pad" is removable and I am thinking about having a metal shop cut a half inch from two ends so it's half square and half round, so it will fit between the two axle brackets. Even this pad is very thick solid steel and will be very difficult for the average home mechanic to cut. It alone weights a couple of pounds.

    I like this jack, it just doesn't fit my RV on the rear axle because the spring and shock bracket are too close together to use this jack.

    This jack is a DynaCraft DC-493L. At least ten years old. An internet search gets no hits.

    -Don- (Reno)

  14. #14
    DonTom
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    I found what should be a decent air compressor to fill up RV tires in no time. It's a bit overkill for filling most tires, but I hate junky cheap air compressors that take all day to fill to 80 PSI.

    Here's what I just purchased.


    Like I mentioned before, ignore the PSI rating as long as it will go to the PSI you need. These big ones always will do what they claim (or better) and fast. My other decent old air compressor (a
    Campbell Hausfeld tankless air compressor, model #MT300009) is rated at 100 psi, but will do 110 psi with ease. What's more important than the PSI rating is the CFM rating at 90 psi. A lot of those cheap 275 psi compressors will burn out well before they can fill up a RV tire to even sixty psi! And yes, I have done exactly that with a so-called "truck" air compressor. If there's no CFM per rating at 90 psi, bet it's junk. And expect any decent air compressor to cost more than a hundred bucks.

    -Don-
    Last edited by DonTom; 02-14-2009 at 05:08 PM.

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