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Thread: Installing Door Mirror

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    Installing Door Mirror

    I need to install a new door mirror on my car. When I drill holes for the screws what size drill bit do I need? 0ne, two or three sizesmaller than the hole?

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyMan View Post
    I need to install a new door mirror on my car. When I drill holes for the screws what size drill bit do I need? 0ne, two or three sizesmaller than the hole?

    Larry
    If using PK (Self tapping) type screws I normally go for the smallest size that will accept the first full turn of the screw. In the usual thin metal used in car manufacture I find this is generally fine.

    Ken.
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    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    If using PK (Self tapping) type screws I normally go for the smallest size that will accept the first full turn of the screw. In the usual thin metal used in car manufacture I find this is generally fine.

    Ken.
    How do you tell the difference between self tapping and regular sheet metal screw? I suppose the screws that came with the mirror are self-tapping, obviously.

    Larry

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    For a regular sheet metal screw into regular fender/door tin, I use an icepick to make a starter hole, and let the screw take care of deforming the metal.

    If your mounting screws have a blunt point, then you will have to drill a pilot hole, just barely bigger than the point.

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    Installing mirror

    If your mounting screws have a blunt point, then you will have to drill a pilot hole, just barely bigger than the point.<<<<<<<

    We're talking about door metal of cars more than 30 years ago which were pretty thick and solid, unlike these contemporary cars made of plastic, alloys and thinner metals so merely making a hole with an ice pick (I doubt an ice pick will make a dent on my car(circa 70's). I'll need a conventional metal punch to begin a small puncture dent for the drill bit to grab a hold.I think my car door is at LEAST 1/16th of an inch thick.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    If using PK (Self tapping) type screws I normally go for the smallest size that will accept the first full turn of the screw. In the usual thin metal used in car manufacture I find this is generally fine.

    Ken.
    Some day I might have to install an after market door mirror and what advice can you give when installing the mounting bracket. There must be a product in the auto parts or hardware stores where when you install and tighten the screws you use the 'product' to keep the screws from becoming loose. Do you call it 'anti-seizure', or something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyMan View Post
    Some day I might have to install an after market door mirror and what advice can you give when installing the mounting bracket. There must be a product in the auto parts or hardware stores where when you install and tighten the screws you use the 'product' to keep the screws from becoming loose. Do you call it 'anti-seizure', or something?
    You are thinking of a 'Locking Compound' Chevy. I've never tried using any on items held by 'Self Tappers' or 'PKs' as they are usually going through a sheet of thin metal. Most locking compounds need a few turns of thread to work as they rely on the exclusion of air to initiate the bonding process. When using locking compounds I always go for 'LOCTITE', one of our better known brands. Locking compounds come in various chemical blends for different types of bond requirements i.e. easily broken, hard, bearing fit etc.

    Ken.
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    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

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    Both Never-Seez and Loctite work best on machine screws, where the bond area is large relative to the screw diameter.

    To retain sheet metal screws, just apply a gob of silicone rtv to the screw threads just before driving them. Once it cures, they won't come out easy.

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    I'm thinking of, as you mentioned, "easily broken", in the event I have to remove the mirror, for any number of reasons later on.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyMan View Post
    I'm thinking of, as you mentioned, "easily broken", in the event I have to remove the mirror, for any number of reasons later on.

    Larry
    I think Mike's suggestion could work well, Larry. I'd never thought of using a silicone sealant - logic says that with a good blob it should work well as it would spread over onto the metal sheet before it started to cure' yet it should be relatively easy to break the bond.. Thanks for a good tip, Mike.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

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