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Thread: Motorcycle Lift

  1. #1
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Motorcycle Lift

    Considering getting a lift for the foundation of my DIY stuff on the bike, trike, and other random vehicles/tools.

    What do ya'll think about this lift?



    Link

    I like it because it is dual action: foot pump and pneumatic.
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    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
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  2. #2
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    I've used similar lifts, during my very brief career as a motorcycle mechanic.
    They're really great to have in a shop, so you don't break your back on routine stuff like oil changes, or just for detailing the bike.
    They're less useful when you need to get the weight off the wheels, e.g. to change a tire.
    They also take up quite a lot of space; that may or may not be important in your shop.

    Harbor Freight used to sell a scissor lift with a plain platform about 2x3 feet that went straight up when you pumped a foot pedal. Something like that might be more useful for working in small shops, for lifting a bike's frame, and especially for lifting a trike.

    Regardless of what you use to lift the bike, you should develop the religious habit of clamping or chaining the bike to the lifting platform (and securely bolt the lift to the floor). It's really embarrassing to have a bike fall off the lift. ... not to mention the damage it can do.

  3. #3
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input Mike. Believe it or not I intend to put this unit in my storage shed!

    Work area is about 14x12 feet. It's tight, but it's the area I have.

    It will be resting on an earth floor. I intend on digging the ground down and putting in some gravel/sand/pavers.

    For sure I will be strapping the unit to the lift when I use it.

    As far as bolting to the floor I'm not sure I can accomplish that, maybe to a large board or something like that.

    I would like something with a big deck to set stuff on. I have some big projects I do on my toys/tools around here and Mickey Mousing on the ground is wearing out my knees, dirtying my tools, making me going up and down a lot, hampering my productivity, and just generally pissing me off..

    I'm replacing both tires and clutch before this riding season and intend on putting in a Baker six speed next winter.

    Wanna get off groundation! HA

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  4. #4
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Amigo,

    What Mike said - and, do the Right Thing and lay down a concrete pad. I did it in my shed/workshop, which also had a dirt floor when we moved here. Dirt floors eat it. Not only messy, but no support for your work and the constant moisture is hard on your stuff.

    It's not technically difficult, doesn't cost much if you do the manual labor yourself (and the area's not too huge; the main expense is the concrete. Main "technical" challenge is estimating how many yards of concrete you need. This will help: http://www.concrete.com/calculators/...ls-calculators )

    Main physical challenge is it's some hard-ass manual labor!


    Basically, what you do is dig out the area (removing roots/crap, etc.) enough to lay/level gravel as a base (you'll need a few tons to do say 20x15 - about what my shed is). You box the area in with boards to create a frame; level the gravel depth. Figure out how many yards of concrete you'll need, then (probably) arrange to have a truck come dump the load. Mixing yourself is very hard to do for any area that's larger than a small walkway, fyi -

    You use rakes, etc. to spread the concrete around and get it reasonable uniform/level within your mold. Wear waterproof boots!

    The last step is "screeting" the top to get it nice and level and smooth.

    I did mine by myself; main grunt work is digging out the foundation and putting down the gravel. Messing with the concrete itself is messy but only takes an hour or so.

    I put down 4 inches, with fiberglass mixed in to the concrete for strength.
    The whole deal cost me less than $1,500.

    Extremely worth it!

  5. #5
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Dang it! I knew you were going to say that! Just don't know if I want to invest that concrete money into the shed. I have plans to eliminate it completely one day.


    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  6. #6
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Dang it! I knew you were going to say that! Just don't know if I want to invest that concrete money into the shed. I have plans to eliminate it completely one day.

    Looks like a solid little shed. If it's basically sound, I'd do it. You have enough land to build more (either add to it, or build another structure) later on. With a real floor, you'd have a nice little workshop - and later, if you built a larger building, you could still use the smaller shed for storage.

    That's what I'd do, anyhow...

    Here's an exterior shot of my shed:
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  7. #7
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    So do you suggest squaring out a pad in the middle of the shed then leaving some gravel between the slap and the 4x4 foundation wood?

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  8. #8
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    So do you suggest squaring out a pad in the middle of the shed then leaving some gravel between the slap and the 4x4 foundation wood?
    Is your shed built on 4x4s? If so, you can do what I did and dig down a couple inches (the whole "floor") then brace/box the upright 4x4s with pressure treated 2x6s to created your form for the gravel/concrete. Put down appx. 2 inches of gravel. Pour appx. 4 inches of concrete on top. You now have a complete wall to wall floor!

  9. #9
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Damn, I am going to be a digging fool!

    But yeah, 4x4 uprights on all the corners.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  10. #10
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Damn, I am going to be a digging fool!

    But yeah, 4x4 uprights on all the corners.
    Yeah, that's the fun part!

    You should be able to git 'er done in a weekend - everything but the pouring of the concrete. For that, you're going to need to wait until it's warmer anyhow.

    But it'll be worth it - you'll see!

    I, too, used to have to squat in the %$%#@! mud - and now I sit on a nice clean concrete floor ...

  11. #11
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post

    and now I sit on a nice clean concrete floor ...
    Sounds like heaven! HA

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  12. #12
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Sounds like heaven! HA
    It definitely makes life easier. Today, for example, I was in there working on my tractor - on my back, removing the hydraulic filter. It's not a fun job, but not having to lie in the dirt makes it a lot better!

  13. #13
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Dude, I love the idea of concrete but I'm not gonna do it!

    This project will go from $430 to a weekend of excavating plus $1500 plus the lift quick.

    Gonna do the quick and dirty. Rocks and pavers!

    Hope my POS Harley don't fall on me!

    Just dropped over 2k for the wife and kid to fly to Japan.

    Then another couple huns on the freaking barrel for my AR.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
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    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

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    At least put some heavy polyethylene film and a pressure- treated wooden deck over the dirt.

  15. #15
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeHalloran View Post
    At least put some heavy polyethylene film and a pressure- treated wooden deck over the dirt.
    Yeah!

    I'm going to dig it down, put some pavers, then some pressure treated wood decking there.

    What is a polyethylene film?

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
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    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

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    A film of polyethylene will act as a vapor barrier, and slow down some of the burrowing critters you find in dirt.

  17. #17
    Senior Member J. ZIMM's Avatar
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    I've been looking at a four posted lift. The main reason is that I want to be able to drive under and though it to park my Classic in its hole while having the Lift up. A two post would work, but I do not trust a Two Post on a 4" thick floor with no re-bar in it. I had one at the shop I worked at and OSHA had them reinforce the floor to 6" with re-bar to the length of 4' in each direction. It had some thing to do with the weight and off balance of the vehicles on the lift. Of course, the concrete had to have 'Bar'' in it. But in my case, just to have some thing to get a car or pickup off the deck would be a great help to me.

  18. #18
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    A four post is excellent for storage purposes. I've seen setups like that on Hot Rod TV etc..

    Guys, should I purchase this lift?

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94121

    I have a crap load of work that needs to be done to the bike and I am itching to make the job easier!

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  19. #19
    Senior Member J. ZIMM's Avatar
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    Dom. what kind of info do they have on this. What is its capacity? Warranty? Some of the stuff I have bought from them is OK. Some of it is JUNK. Look at its construction, I think they say it will hold up to a Thousand or so pounds. If that will do the trick, then go for it. But keep in mind, cheap price, cheap built. Hope this helps.

  20. #20
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    A four post is excellent for storage purposes. I've seen setups like that on Hot Rod TV etc..

    Guys, should I purchase this lift?

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94121

    I have a crap load of work that needs to be done to the bike and I am itching to make the job easier!
    I'm with JZimm,

    Be very cautious about a major purchase from Harbor Freight. Some of their stuff is ok - but some is real crap. Be wary of a price that seems too good to be true, especially for something that's not just a throwaway (like a cheap set of screwdrivers).

    It's been awhile since I've priced lifts, so I'm not sure offhand whether the price you've quoted falls into the "too good to be true" category.

    But I am leery about the "Central Hydraulics" brand. Never heard of them. I suspect the thing was "drop forged" in China... meaning a guy named Chin dropped the thing near the forge....

    I'd be more confident about something like this:

    http://www.superlifts.com/motorcyclelifts/ml1000.html

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