Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Dilemma... dual sport v. touring bike

  1. #1
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The Land of The Edentulites
    Posts
    22,896

    Dilemma... dual sport v. touring bike

    Guys,

    I'd like your input on something I'm thinking about... .

    Right now, I have three bikes, including a 2000 KLR250 dual sport. I am interested in acquiring a touring bike, specifically, an old (early '80s) Honda GL500 or GL650 Silverwing. I'd like one because I don't have a bike that's any good for longer rides, or poor weather riding. I will not subject my restored (and really shiny/pretty) '76 Kz900 to rain; ditto my '03 ZRX1200.

    But before I can buy another bike I think I need to get rid of one of my current bikes. My garage is full, for one - and for two, I'm trying to be sane about it and not bleed us white paying taxes and insurance and upkeep costs on four bikes.

    That leads me to focus on the KLR250.

    Two or three years ago, I had dirt-biking friends so it was nice to have a bike to ride with them. I enjoy riding off-road.

    But my dirt-biking friends have all "retired." They're no longer into it. So I don't ride off-road much anymore and the KLR250 mostly just sits.

    I know it probably makes sense to go ahead and sell it, but I am reluctant to do so and worry I'd end up regretting not having an of-road capable bike around.

    Anyhow, I'm sure many of you have experienced the dilemma of wanting another bike but having too many already or something along those lines...

    Any thoughts/advice?

  2. #2
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    3,488
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Guys,

    I'd like your input on something I'm thinking about... .

    Right now, I have three bikes, including a 2000 KLR250 dual sport. I am interested in acquiring a touring bike, specifically, an old (early '80s) Honda GL500 or GL650 Silverwing. I'd like one because I don't have a bike that's any good for longer rides, or poor weather riding. I will not subject my restored (and really shiny/pretty) '76 Kz900 to rain; ditto my '03 ZRX1200.

    But before I can buy another bike I think I need to get rid of one of my current bikes. My garage is full, for one - and for two, I'm trying to be sane about it and not bleed us white paying taxes and insurance and upkeep costs on four bikes.

    That leads me to focus on the KLR250.

    Two or three years ago, I had dirt-biking friends so it was nice to have a bike to ride with them. I enjoy riding off-road.

    But my dirt-biking friends have all "retired." They're no longer into it. So I don't ride off-road much anymore and the KLR250 mostly just sits.

    I know it probably makes sense to go ahead and sell it, but I am reluctant to do so and worry I'd end up regretting not having an of-road capable bike around.

    Anyhow, I'm sure many of you have experienced the dilemma of wanting another bike but having too many already or something along those lines...

    Any thoughts/advice?
    None of your bikes are your primary source of transport, therefore you do not 'need' any of them, this should make the decision easier. You have only one dual sport so I would suggest keeping the KLR.

    Your restored Kwakker is special, I have seen your pictures and it looks like a superb example of its genre. The ZRX12 is a nice bike - but - it is modern, it is easily replaceable and has performance which, unlike that of the 900 you can never exploit to the full.

    Logically, therefore, I would suggest keep the KLR and the Kwakker 900, one for off road and t'other for the occasional 'blast'. Then go and look for a GL500, 650 or 1100. All retro, all classic and hopefully appreciating investments.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  3. #3
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The Land of The Edentulites
    Posts
    22,896
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    None of your bikes are your primary source of transport, therefore you do not 'need' any of them, this should make the decision easier. You have only one dual sport so I would suggest keeping the KLR.

    Your restored Kwakker is special, I have seen your pictures and it looks like a superb example of its genre. The ZRX12 is a nice bike - but - it is modern, it is easily replaceable and has performance which, unlike that of the 900 you can never exploit to the full.

    Logically, therefore, I would suggest keep the KLR and the Kwakker 900, one for off road and t'other for the occasional 'blast'. Then go and look for a GL500, 650 or 1100. All retro, all classic and hopefully appreciating investments.

    Ken.
    Here's a pic of the bike I am considering; an '82 GL500 Interstate:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    3,488
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Here's a pic of the bike I am considering; an '82 GL500 Interstate:
    If that is a picture of the actual bike you are thinking of purchasing it certainly looks like a very well maintained machine. Obviously I would not need to tell you to look at mileage, tyres, suspension, servicing history etc, etc.

    The spec is good, 50 odd brake horse powertop speed at around 95 mph should be fine for gentle touring. 4 valves per cylinder, compression ratio at 10:1 indicates a fairly unstressed engine. Shaft drive reduces maintenance requirements. Good gas tank capacity and relatively light weight should give good range. Dual front discs are a bonus where I am concerned. Engine at 30 ci is adequate for solo riding but for long distances two up, with luggage, I would be looking more at the 650/1100. If you are looking for a 70/80 mph mile muncher, mainly for solo riding it should fit your bill providing you are happy with a 95 mph top wack.


    Power:50.00 HP (36.5 kW)) @ 9000 RPM
    Top speed:153.0 km/h (95.1 mph)
    Compression:10.0:1
    Bore x stroke:78.0 x 52.0 mm (3.1 x 2.0 inches)
    Valves per cylinder:4
    Fuel control:OHV
    Cooling system:Liquid
    Gearbox:5-speed
    Transmission type,
    final drive:

    Shaft drive (cardan)
    Chassis, suspension, brakes and wheels
    Front tyre dimensions:3.50-19
    Rear tyre dimensions:130/90-16
    Front brakes:Dual disc
    Rear brakes:Expanding brake
    Physical measures and capacities
    Weight incl. oil, gas, etc:235.0 kg (518.1 pounds)
    Fuel capacity:20.00 litres (5.28 gallons)
    Last edited by Ken; 07-18-2010 at 11:07 AM.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chicago vicinity
    Posts
    549
    I like that bike but an 1982? It's old Eric heck my son wasn't even born yet. Perhaps sell the bike you least ride or even two and get a good touring bike. The GoldWings are fine but have you ever considered a Yamaha Venture. Let Mr K show you those specs and you'll see a difference. Eric I know your young but honestly I don't see many 30 plus year old on dirt bikes. That is a young man's game.

  6. #6
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The Land of The Edentulites
    Posts
    22,896
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    I like that bike but an 1982? It's old Eric heck my son wasn't even born yet. Perhaps sell the bike you least ride or even two and get a good touring bike. The GoldWings are fine but have you ever considered a Yamaha Venture. Let Mr K show you those specs and you'll see a difference. Eric I know your young but honestly I don't see many 30 plus year old on dirt bikes. That is a young man's game.
    I dig old stuff.

    And if you're a decent wrench, keeping up an old bike is much easier (and far less expensive) than dealing with a modern ECU-controlled/EFI-equipped bike.

    On the GL500, for example, one could go through the entire engine for about $800, parts and machine shop work. The carbs are simple and easy to rebuild. Ditto the suspension. Nothing elaborate.

    Most service replacement parts are still available; the only tough stuff on these old rides is trim, which can be hard to find and expensive.

  7. #7
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Front Royal, VA
    Posts
    1,606
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post

    I know it probably makes sense to go ahead and sell it, but I am reluctant to do so and worry I'd end up regretting not having an of-road capable bike around.


    Any thoughts/advice?
    My advice is "don't get rid of the dirt machine."

    You never know when you will need those capabilities.

    I was reading those specs Ken posted and glanced at the top speed and about swallowed the dip I was getting ready to spit, then realized I was reading km not mph.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

Similar Threads

  1. Depression dual sport ?
    By Eric in forum On Two Wheels
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-30-2009, 05:50 AM
  2. US Navy requires sport-bike training
    By chiph in forum On Two Wheels
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-24-2008, 06:29 AM
  3. Ugliest sport bike on the road...
    By Eric in forum On Two Wheels
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-14-2008, 04:54 PM
  4. Sport Bike track time
    By Eric in forum On Two Wheels
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-11-2008, 12:41 PM
  5. The first "real" American brand sport bike?
    By Eric in forum On Two Wheels
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-20-2007, 07:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •