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Thread: Are you better off than a Vanderbilt?

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    Are you better off than a Vanderbilt?

    If you've ever been to George Vanderbilt's winter digs in Asheville North Carolina (known as Biltmore House), it's a really impressive sight. Over a hundred rooms filled with priceless antiques & artwork. But the truly innovative part of the house was things like the swimming pool, bowling alley, and plumbing.

    Things that everyone today has easy access to.

    The chart in the article is the interesting thing. 98% of the "poor" now own a color TV. 84% now own a clothes washer, up from 58% in 1984.

    http://thewhitedsepulchre.blogspot.c...anderbilt.html

    Chip H.

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    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiph View Post
    If you've ever been to George Vanderbilt's winter digs in Asheville North Carolina (known as Biltmore House), it's a really impressive sight. Over a hundred rooms filled with priceless antiques & artwork. But the truly innovative part of the house was things like the swimming pool, bowling alley, and plumbing.

    Things that everyone today has easy access to.

    The chart in the article is the interesting thing. 98% of the "poor" now own a color TV. 84% now own a clothes washer, up from 58% in 1984.

    http://thewhitedsepulchre.blogspot.c...anderbilt.html

    Chip H.
    The Biltmore is a beautiful place; I've been there several times. It's almost right off the Blue Ridge Parkway, too, so I can literally drive there from here almost entirely on the Parkway.

    Wealth can be measured in terms of independence - especially financial independence - as much as it can by possession of material goods. Yes, we have more "stuff" - even low-income people usually have all that you mention, plus a car and a flatscreen TV.

    But more of us than ever have become wage serfs, too - made possible by the credit/consumer system. Most of us actually own less in term of things like equity/assets (especially houses/land/money in the bank).

    People live a more precarious existence as a result.

    A farmer of 1860 may not have had plumbing - and an American autoworker of 1960 may not have owned multiple TVs - but both were more secure in ways that matter than the typical American is today.

    Our "affluence" is, to a great extent, a Potemkin Village.

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