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Thread: Tires

  1. #1
    Senior Member DonTom's Avatar
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    Tires

    If you were to buy a new motorcycle tire, what is the oldest tire date you would accept?

    And what's the oldest tire (with good thread) that you will be willing to ride on?

    I ride very little these days and I have two motorcycles (1971 BMW R75/5 & 1984 Yamaha Venture) with tires around 20 years old, that still have most of the thread. No problems so far, but I will replace them all before the next ride.

    BTW, here's a recent picture of my 1971 BMW R75/5 (I purchased
    new in 1971):

    -Don-

  2. #2
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    If you were to buy a new motorcycle tire, what is the oldest tire date you would accept?

    And what's the oldest tire (with good thread) that you will be willing to ride on?

    I ride very little these days and I have two motorcycles (1971 BMW R75/5 & 1984 Yamaha Venture) with tires around 20 years old, that still have most of the thread. No problems so far, but I will replace them all before the next ride.

    BTW, here's a recent picture of my 1971 BMW R75/5 (I purchased
    new in 1971):

    -Don-
    Well, for me, a lot depends on the type of riding involved.

    My antique Kz900 has Metzelers on it that have low miles but which are at least seven years old now. I just use this bike for knocking around on; no high speeds or aggressive cornering. I think it's safe enough for that, even though the tires are old. Provided I don't subject them to sustained high speeds or other forms of loading, such as carrying a passenger, etc.

    I physically check the tires for signs of cracks and so on. But I don't plan on replacing them until the tread is worn out enough to justify doing so.

    Now, for a sport bike that's ridden at high speeds, or cornered aggressively, I would not feel comfortable using a tire older than three years, irrespective of the mileage on them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DonTom's Avatar
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    I physically check the tires for signs of cracks and so on. But I don't plan on replacing them until the tread is worn out enough to justify doing so.

    Now, for a sport bike that's ridden at high speeds, or cornered aggressively, I would not feel comfortable using a tire older than three years, irrespective of the mileage on them.
    Does that mean you would be willing to ride on 20 year old tires if they look okay on the outside, if you rode the bike like a little old lady?

    Anyway, I am changing them all by next spring. I already purchased a rear tire, just yesterday, for the BMW and after I mount it, I will remove the front wheel for a tire replacement. I noticed the new rear tire has a "2009" date on it. I assume that means the 20th week of 09. I was wondering if that's considered old for a new tire.

    -Don-

  4. #4
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post

    And what's the oldest tire (with good thread) that you will be willing to ride on?
    I just asked myself this question a few months ago, but on a car.

    My toy car had about 10 years on the tires with very little miles.

    I hadn't driven it for about three years then ended up taking it out one day.

    On one of the wheels the valve stem began to leak at the base.

    I learned my lesson.

    Even if the tire looks good don't forget the valve stems are important too!

    Actually learned this lesson twice in two different ways.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DonTom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    I just asked myself this question a few months ago, but on a car.

    My toy car had about 10 years on the tires with very little miles.

    I hadn't driven it for about three years then ended up taking it out one day.

    On one of the wheels the valve stem began to leak at the base.

    I learned my lesson.

    Even if the tire looks good don't forget the valve stems are important too!

    Actually learned this lesson twice in two different ways.
    There is a big recall on Chinese Valve stems.

    They are VERY commonly used with USA tires. I have had problems with a few too. Everybody should check their valves when they check their tires on ANY vehicle. Even my RV had a problem with a Chinese valve. A VERY common problem!

    But none of the new valve stems sold now should have that problem.

    -Don-

  6. #6
    Senior Member DonTom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    I just asked myself this question a few months ago, but on a car.
    With RV's, the limit is seven years from the date code, even if the tire is not used at all. Cars and bikes MIGHT be the same rule, but perhaps not as important as on a RV. RV's have been totaled by blowouts when the metal from the belts flies into the tanks and everything else. I have seen the damage a blow out can cause on a rather new RV. It looked like it was totaled out! I think tires are more critical with heavier vehicles.

    With my little DR200SE I can still ride the bike on a totally flat rear tire. And have done such for about 20 miles. I didn't even know I had a flat until somebody yelled at me.

    -Don-

  7. #7
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Does that mean you would be willing to ride on 20 year old tires if they look okay on the outside, if you rode the bike like a little old lady?

    Anyway, I am changing them all by next spring. I already purchased a rear tire, just yesterday, for the BMW and after I mount it, I will remove the front wheel for a tire replacement. I noticed the new rear tire has a "2009" date on it. I assume that means the 20th week of 09. I was wondering if that's considered old for a new tire.

    -Don-
    20 year old tires... I dunno. I'd probably go ahead and buy a new set at that point.

    Unless the bike is mostly a show bike or rarely ever ridden - in which case I'd leave them on until they were obviously falling apart!

  8. #8
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    I have some 25 year old tires on my Honda 350x trike, but that unit never sees more than 5lbs of pressure in each tire and never goes over 50mph or on roads.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Oldfrtbkr's Avatar
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    My toy car had about 10 years on the tires with very little miles.

    I hadn't driven it for about three years then ended up taking it out one day.

    ================================================== ======
    My toy truck, a 1990 Ford Ranger which just turned over 51000 miles, is only used for four or five short fishing trips in the summer, spends the rest of the year in inside storage. This spring I went to Discount Tires, where the tires were purchased, for a rotation and balance. I was informed that since the tires, which are in great shape, are over ten years old, they won't service a tire that old. Even after my digging out the receipt for the tires showing I'd bought them at that very store I was told no, they felt the liability was too great.

    I thanked them,, drove around the corner to Sears and 20 minutes and $15.00 later I was aired, balanced and rotated.

    This will deffinately have a difference on where I buy my next set of tires

  10. #10
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldfrtbkr View Post
    This will deffinately have a difference on where I buy my next set of tires
    That is interesting.

    Reminds me of when I purchased some new skins for my hog.

    I called up the Harley dealership down the street and asked how much to mount some tires. They told me they wouldn't even touch something they don't sell, so I called a pop shop down the street and got the rear done for 20 bucks.

    "Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato "
    -Mussolini
    All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

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