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Thread: thinking of selling bike

  1. #1
    Senior Member bikerlbf406's Avatar
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    thinking of selling bike

    Well I'm contemplating selling my bike to my brother. I am getting some minor cramps in my legs while riding it, even on a very short ride. Also, I just haven't had the energy to get out there and ride like I should and the bike been sitting more then I have been riding it, even when we have great weather. Not counting the bike does need some minor work done to it, which I don't really feel like dishing the money out on, as well as I just haven't had the fun and thrill that I had when riding the last bike. So I think maybe its time I quit riding and go ahead and sell to my brother, who has the spark in his life right now to where he truly wants to get out there and ride, and allow the bike to get ridden like it should. Any thoughts on the subject?
    Tim, proud owner of 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 & 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel


  2. #2
    Senior Member grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerlbf406 View Post
    Well I'm contemplating selling my bike to my brother. I am getting some minor cramps in my legs while riding it, even on a very short ride. Also, I just haven't had the energy to get out there and ride like I should and the bike been sitting more then I have been riding it, even when we have great weather. Not counting the bike does need some minor work done to it, which I don't really feel like dishing the money out on, as well as I just haven't had the fun and thrill that I had when riding the last bike. So I think maybe its time I quit riding and go ahead and sell to my brother, who has the spark in his life right now to where he truly wants to get out there and ride, and allow the bike to get ridden like it should. Any thoughts on the subject?

    I wondered how long it would be before you outgrew the bike. A 550cc bike is a great starter bike. However, from what you've said, anything under 750cc is too small for someone your size. I like bikes in the liter range. 1000 to 1100 cc's. Big enough for anyone, small enough to be handy. Put me on a 550 and people would think the circus is in town and a bear got loose.
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  3. #3
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    I tend to agree with Grouch. I think you need a bigger bike; and not just that - a dedicated cruising or touring bike, not a standard. You need the better (more comfortable) seating position a cruising/touring bike would give you. I don't think the power/performance is the issue.

    Good news is you could sell your bike and probably come out roughly even - and use the money to buy a more comfortable cruising/touring bike.

    That's what I recommend -

  4. #4
    Senior Member grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    I tend to agree with Grouch. I think you need a bigger bike; and not just that - a dedicated cruising or touring bike, not a standard. You need the better (more comfortable) seating position a cruising/touring bike would give you. I don't think the power/performance is the issue.

    Good news is you could sell your bike and probably come out roughly even - and use the money to buy a more comfortable cruising/touring bike.

    That's what I recommend -

    Actually, a standard is just fine. I get charlie horses in a cramped position myself. Cruisers tend to hunch you over a bit more than a standard. They let you sit upright. A bike I would suggest is either a 750 Nighthawk or the older version, the CB750. Plenty of power, a large enough frame to let you stretch out, nearly maintenance free riding (oil changes and tires usually, hydraulic lifters don't need adjusting) and tires and brakes every now and then. You don't want a Sport or Sport Touring bike as those tend to cramp your legs under you. Anything with a boxer engine (flat 2 or flat four, like a Goldwing) may also cause problems. I know on my Goldwings (I'm on my third one now) walking the bike backwards you knock your shins on the engine if you aren't careful.


    Something a lot of people like to use are highway pegs. I used to use them but I got a wasp or yellow jacket up my pants leg once and he was PISSED!!!!!! Probably 12-15 welts from stinging afterward.
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    Senior Member bikerlbf406's Avatar
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    my problem with buying a larger cruiser or touring bike is the weight issue. I could barely handle the weight of the bike now when turning it around or pushing it, which I would have to do as my drive way and garage neither one has the room to ride the bike around, so I have to push it around for it will face forward after I get back from a ride, and I can barely handle it now. Theres no way I could handle the additional weight of a larger bike.
    Tim, proud owner of 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 & 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel


  6. #6
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Do you know how much your current bike weighs?

    I'm guessing it's in the 400-450 pound range...

    You might look around for what I got - an early '80s Honda GL Silverwing. The 500 weighs less than 500 pounds and is very manageable. It's also much more comfortable than what you have. The seat is lower, wider, softer. Peg position is more forward (so your knees and legs aren't as bent). "Buckhorn" style bars are easier on the wrists. Plus it has excellent wind protection, lots of storage (so you can use it for commuting or to go shopping as well as road tripping) and it gets close to 50 MPGs. Best of all, you can buy one these for about $2,000 or even less if you shop around.





    Quote Originally Posted by bikerlbf406 View Post
    my problem with buying a larger cruiser or touring bike is the weight issue. I could barely handle the weight of the bike now when turning it around or pushing it, which I would have to do as my drive way and garage neither one has the room to ride the bike around, so I have to push it around for it will face forward after I get back from a ride, and I can barely handle it now. Theres no way I could handle the additional weight of a larger bike.

  7. #7
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerlbf406 View Post
    my problem with buying a larger cruiser or touring bike is the weight issue. I could barely handle the weight of the bike now when turning it around or pushing it, which I would have to do as my drive way and garage neither one has the room to ride the bike around, so I have to push it around for it will face forward after I get back from a ride, and I can barely handle it now. Theres no way I could handle the additional weight of a larger bike.
    Hey, Tim. Sorry to hear your problems with the 'bike. One thing to remember is that the weight distribution makes a big difference to moving the 'bike around. The rolling friction of most 'bikes is virtually zero - unless you have a flat tire, weight distribution is the killer. The lower the center of gravity the easier the bike will be to handle. I imagine Eric's Silverwing is very easy to move around. (Also remember there are castors blocks that you can ride your front wheel onto and then just spin the bike round in its own length.) I have to be very careful with my CBR6RR - if the 'bike goes away from me, when I am manouvering it, there is no way I could hold it now, I just don't have the strength in my wrists and shoulders. My brother's BMW R850R, by comparison, was far easier to handle as its C of G was much lower. When you narrow your choice down, go and try and get the opportunity to wheel the 'bikes around, you'll be surprised at the difference between the various machines.

    Ken.
    Last edited by Ken; 04-20-2011 at 08:52 AM. Reason: Typo.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member eesquared's Avatar
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    I think you should sell it to your brother. If you derive no enjoyment from it, then it has outlasted its usefulness to you. That does not mean that it is not useful for someone else, though.

    And, who better to sell it to than your brother? He can benefit from the usefulness of the bike and you get some cash in your pocket to pursue other pleasures.

    Sounds like a good idea to me.

  9. #9
    Senior Member bikerlbf406's Avatar
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    As far as I know my bike weighs around 500 pounds. My question is though if i'm no longer receiving enjoyment out of this bike, do you really think that could change by getting another bike?
    Tim, proud owner of 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 & 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel


  10. #10
    Senior Member Piney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerlbf406 View Post
    As far as I know my bike weighs around 500 pounds. My question is though if i'm no longer receiving enjoyment out of this bike, do you really think that could change by getting another bike?

    Tim. I've never met you, so I really don't *know* you, per se, but after reading through this thread I'm pretty sure you've made your mind up. And, since you've posed the question in a public forum I'll give you my opinion - You should sell the bike and consider another interest. If the desire to ride ever hits you again, then by all means, buy yourself another bike.

  11. #11
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    No one can answer that question but you!

    If it's just this particular bike that's not right - and not riding as such - then you just need another bike. A few years back, a buddy of mine who was part-owner of a bike store that sold Indians let me take a new Chief for a couple of days. As industrial sculpture it was a work of art. Gorgeous to look at. But it was a pig to ride. I did not enjoy it at all and if that was what all bikes were like, I likely would not be riding!

    Do you have any friends with different types of bikes that would let you ride theirs? Then you can see whether it's time to hang it up - or shop for a bike that fits you better...


    Quote Originally Posted by bikerlbf406 View Post
    As far as I know my bike weighs around 500 pounds. My question is though if i'm no longer receiving enjoyment out of this bike, do you really think that could change by getting another bike?

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    Another point of view:
    Before you took possession, you were all lathered up about doing the necessary work yourself, or learning to do so, but then ... well, you seemed to decide that you didn't have time, or enthusiasm, for it.

    The money you paid for repairs to an old bike might have paid for a newer bike, which might have given you more seat time.

  13. #13
    Ridin Dirty dom's Avatar
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    I say get the biggest bike you can handle (frame wise) with the most engine displacement and leg room. Something with an upright riding position and allows arms out at a comfortable angle. Something with a windshield (removable or not). Something that has the ability to carry enough stuff that you could buy some groceries with it.

    You can't go wrong with a bike like this.

    My $0.02.

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  14. #14
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    This is off track a bit but I have to say I'm riding the "bagger" I got a few months back more than any of my other bikes. My sport bike is hell on wheels but it has zero wind/weather protection and the seat's as hard on your ass after 30 minutes as sitting on a rock.

    The Honda I can take to the store, pick up stuff and do almost anything I could do with a car. I can ride it for hours and not feel beaten up...

    I've put more than 1,000 miles on it already this season...


    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    I say get the biggest bike you can handle (frame wise) with the most engine displacement and leg room. Something with an upright riding position and allows arms out at a comfortable angle. Something with a windshield (removable or not). Something that has the ability to carry enough stuff that you could buy some groceries with it.

    You can't go wrong with a bike like this.

    My $0.02.

  15. #15
    Senior Member grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    I say get the biggest bike you can handle (frame wise) with the most engine displacement and leg room. Something with an upright riding position and allows arms out at a comfortable angle. Something with a windshield (removable or not). Something that has the ability to carry enough stuff that you could buy some groceries with it.

    You can't go wrong with a bike like this.

    My $0.02.

    One of the most forgiving bikes is the early Goldwing. The GL1000 and 1100 bikes have a VERY low center of gravity. The 1200's were problematic but the 1976-83 bikes were very reliable, comfortable for even larger riders, and the center of gravity let even a clumsy rider keep ot upright. I'm on my second GL1100 now and love it. If I could get an Aspencade 1500 with reverse, I'd go for it. Otherwise I'm happy with my bike. The flat four engine and fuel tank low behind the engine makes it very easy to handle. The biggest problem is when you try to walk the bike backwards, you whack your shins on the heads as they stick out.
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    I love my Venture. It's big and comfy and easy enough to turn. Sometimes need to slow down a bit and a teeny weeny more lean can help. I started on a 650cc V-star and was able to learn quite a bit on it before trading up to a 1100cc then 1650cc now I'm down to a 1240cc but it's got everything and then some. I remember in my old 650 cc days there wasn't a day I wouldn't try riding and enjoyed the hell out of it. Honestly my friend you need a bike you can really enjoy and love. Your young so don't feel bad if it's not working out. Got plenty of time to try again in the future but really take your time and work it out. Just remember bikes and gear are an expensive hobby so make sure your ready in all areas before really getting into it. I tell ya man go to Alton Memorial Day weekend if that don't get you fired up forget about it and live to ride another day.

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    Well I'm contemplating selling my bike to my brother. I am getting some minor cramps in my legs while riding it, even on a very short ride. Also, I just haven't had the energy to get out there and ride like I should and the bike been sitting more then I have been riding it, even when we have great weather. Not counting the bike does need some minor work done to it, which I don't really feel like dishing the money out on, as well as I just haven't had the fun and thrill that I had when riding the last bike. So I think maybe its time I quit riding and go ahead and sell to my brother, who has the spark in his life right now to where he truly wants to get out there and ride, and allow the bike to get ridden like it should. Any thoughts on the subject?

    Look what I'll say may sound conversational but sell the dam thing and get rid of it. It was your first ride and serverd the purpose but it's not your style. After selling take some time into getting another bike. Your very young so just relax and think about it. Once your ready if that time comes make sure you have plenty of money saved up as you see bikes are expensive hobby.
    Now here is the kicker get yourself a Harley. I know the area you live in and been that way more then a few times. Harley been buiding bikes since the dawn of bike time so they will not only get the right bike for you but they will keep it properly serviced and you'll enjoy it the rest of your life. Yes the bike will last long after your kids kids learn to ride it. Plus the shop will always be around so you can have it serviced anytime and all the time. In the long run it will be a cheaper investment. No only will Harley put you on the right bike for you they will have instructors to help you ride it. You'll be riding with hog groups and be able to ride anywhere and you'll be proud of your machine. That's what I think you should do anyway.

  18. #18
    Senior Member bikerlbf406's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the help everyone. Right now I have my Jeep that I'm in the process of trying to get all fixed up, and that is taking a good size portion of my money. I think I will go ahead and sell this bike, and concentrate on a few other things for the time being, and then once I'm done with everything, if I still want to ride, then see about purchasing another bike.
    Tim, proud owner of 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 & 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel


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