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Thread: When did chains get so expensive?

  1. #1

    When did chains get so expensive?

    Coming up on 30K miles with my 98 VTR1000 and the chain has a bunch of sticky/dry spots. I've taken very good care of it, but it's time for a replacement.

    Priced them online and the cheapest kit I can find with chain/sprockets is $215. Last time I did a chain was on my beater '89 Katana 600 and it cost me less than $75. Is there a reason chains have gotten so expensive?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    That's really not a bad price for a precut/spliced chain and two sprockets.
    Maybe the parts are special, or at least not 'generic' in some way?
    Or it could be just inflation; did you price Katana parts _today_?

  3. #3
    No, I didn't look to see how much Katana kits were. Too much in sticker shock. Thought maybe there was some innovation that made chains more expensive or something.

    I'm going to take this one off and soak it overnight in Kerosene then work some oil into it and see if it clears up. Besides the stick/dry spots it's in excellent shape. The wear indicators still show it being almost new.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    No, I didn't look to see how much Katana kits were. Too much in sticker shock. Thought maybe there was some innovation that made chains more expensive or something.

    I'm going to take this one off and soak it overnight in Kerosene then work some oil into it and see if it clears up. Besides the stick/dry spots it's in excellent shape. The wear indicators still show it being almost new.
    Depending on the type and quality of 'Chain and Sprocket Kit' wanted, prices over here seem to range from around 105/$168 to 158/$253 so, compared with us, your price might not be too far out.

    X, X2 and O ring chains are sealed for life so there is not an awful lot you can do to restore them. Other non-sealed types we used to wash thoroughly in Kero then heat up some heavy gear oil, (or a special chain oil made for the purpose) in a tin, till it was good and hot (but not boiling) then drop the chain in and leave it it overnight. In the morning, remove the chain from the oil, wipe it down to remove all surplus oil and check it again. This would often give a chain a new lease of life and for years I personally used it as my routine chain maintenance tool carried out once a month.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  5. #5
    That's pretty much how I've always done it Ken. I use a paintbrush and kerosene and clean it link by link while its on the bike. I used to use gearlube, but it flings all over the place even after trying diligently to remove the excess.

    I've started using the dupont teflon spray lube. It gets good reviews and is much easier to apply every other tank of gas than the gear lube.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    I can recommend a Scottoiler:

    http://www.scottoiler.com/

  7. #7
    Well, today I found a chain and sprocket set for less than $200 shipped. That's the best I can do. But...

    Now I need to buy a chain riveter. My buddy that had one has moved. Any recommendations on a cheap riveter that I'll probably only ever use once?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    Well, today I found a chain and sprocket set for less than $200 shipped. That's the best I can do. But...

    Now I need to buy a chain riveter. My buddy that had one has moved. Any recommendations on a cheap riveter that I'll probably only ever use once?
    A good chain riveter is an investment, a cheap one is usually a dead loss. I've always hand riveted my chain links using a ball peen hammer to peen over the rivets whilst holding a four pound club hammer (or similar lump of very heavy metal) behind the link. It is not a job to be rushed but will produce a riveted link as good as any other and I have never had one fail. It does need a steady hand though, as the riveting needs to be quite precise.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

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