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Thread: The Kentucky Bend

  1. #1

    The Kentucky Bend

    Ever been to this little geographer's hiccup in the Mississippi River? I did over my Christmas break - put 2173.3 miles on old Traveler in four days and six states (Virginia, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Kentucky).

    Anyway, here's the scoop. Apparently, the New Madrid Earthquake of 1812 put a small chunk of Kentucky into a small exclave separate from the state. It is surrounded entirely by Missouri and Tennessee, and is sometimes called 'Bubbleland'. I went and got some pictures.

    Coming into KY: http://p.twimg.com/AhvXMXbCIAAyX-_.jpg

    Typical house. I think this little bend has no inhabitants. Looks abandoned: http://p.twimg.com/AhvXS05CIAAodZC.jpg

    Pyramid Head's driveway: http://p.twimg.com/AhvYbwFCIAEWovZ.jpg

    I didn't stay long. I got the idea that I would have about three generation's worth of loaded shotguns pointed at me if I did. So I took those pictures and left. I stayed about 15 minutes total. The whole place was very surreal and weird - very Silent Hill, with the fog and abandoned structures. Smelled a bit dank, too. God only knows what's in the basements of those places.
    If we should give Abraham Lincoln credit for uniting America, then we should give Adolf Hitler credit for uniting Europe, as both men used the same methods for the same goals.

  2. #2
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RebelKnightCSA View Post
    I didn't stay long. I got the idea that I would have about three generation's worth of loaded shotguns pointed at me if I did. So I took those pictures and left. I stayed about 15 minutes total. The whole place was very surreal and weird - very Silent Hill, with the fog and abandoned structures. Smelled a bit dank, too. God only knows what's in the basements of those places.
    That place just looks ....Eerie! Down in the basements? Be afraid, be very afraid!

    Ken.
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    Ken.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member eesquared's Avatar
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    Hmm...Could this be the origin of the famed "Hatfields and McCoys"? From wikipedia:

    In Mark Twain's book Life on the Mississippi,[6] he reports on the six-decade long feud between the Darnell and Watson families and other elements of life in the Bend. "In no part of the South has the vendetta flourished more briskly, or held out longer between warring families, than in this particular region,” he wrote. Twain continues:

    Front stone for the Madrid Bend families' cemetery (known in official registries as Whitson Cemetery).


    Both families belonged to the same church ... They lived each side of the line, and the church was at a landing called Compromise. Half the church and half the aisle was in Kentucky, the other half in Tennessee. Sundays you'd see the families drive up, all in their Sunday clothes, men, women, and children, and file up the aisle, and set down, quiet and orderly, one lot on the Tennessee side of the church and the other on the Kentucky side; and the men and boys would lean their guns up against the wall, handy, and then all hands would join in with the prayer and praise; though they say the man next to the aisle didn't kneel down, along with the rest of the family; kind of stood guard.


  4. #4
    I saw that cemetery, too. I didn't stop there, as it was just too, too creepy for me. With due respect to the dead, I am not going to a cemetery in the middle of nowhere which looks like something from Silent Hill. Maybe if the light was good, sure - but again, the locals in places like that generally do NOT abide outsiders, so...
    If we should give Abraham Lincoln credit for uniting America, then we should give Adolf Hitler credit for uniting Europe, as both men used the same methods for the same goals.

  5. #5
    Senior Member grouch's Avatar
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    There are a lot of quirks in geography around here. I'm not too far from there. During the 1811-1812 earthquakes, the Mississippi ran backwards for a bit to make reelfoot lake. North of there on the upper Mississippi river is a section of Illinois that is on the Missouri side of the river. That's what happens when the rivers move. The northern state border of Kentucky is the north bank of the Ohio river as it ran in 1792. Head south on U.S. 41 and you are in Kentucky about a mile before you get to the river.

    On the very southern tip of Illinois is Fort Defiant State Park. During the Civil War it was there to stop Confederate gun boats that might come up the river. It's also where the Ohio and Mississippi rivers meet. You can see where the muddy waters of the Ohio meet the greyer waters of the Mississippi. Technically, it's actually the Ohio that runs into the Gulf of Mexico but 200+ years of habit have people saying the Mississippi is all the way. Plus it's more bragging, something I don't like to do.

    By the way, you weren't too far from Monkey's Eyebrow Kentucky.
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