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Thread: Old Gas Stations

  1. #1
    gail
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    Old Gas Stations


  2. #2
    D_E_Davis
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by gail
    I hope the link works.
    Yes, it does - and I've filled up at one of those stations.


  3. #3
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Very cool.

  4. #4
    mrblanche
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    I've seen some of those stations, and I have to say I DO miss them. But then, I hate the interstates and what they've done to travel in the U.S.

  5. #5
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblanche
    I've seen some of those stations, and I have to say I DO miss them. But then, I hate the interstates and what they've done to travel in the U.S.
    That's funny you mention that. I used to love to travel on non interstate roads. No more - Most of them down here are torn up, over devloped rolling billboards. Just today, I was in Orange City and Enterprise, FL. On the non-interstate roads, I was greeted with one corporate big box and Chain restaurant shopping strip after another, in good old redneck Volusia County.( And I though Seminole was bad.) I had a sense of relief when I got onto an Interstate. At least you can see trees on either side of the highway and you can run without having to stop for some artificial shopping destination... I could go on, but I HATE the way development is done across this once great country.

  6. #6
    mrblanche
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    You have some good points, but the joke when the interstates were new was that we were spending billions to build highways in the only places where there was nothing to see.

    Backroad travel has always been slower, and more dangerous, too. Too many distractions, too many side streets, too many inexperienced drivers, too many bicycles, and on and on.

    I have some fond memories of trips between Denver, CO, and Muskegon, MI. What I wouldn't give to be a kid again and make those trips again.

  7. #7
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    "That's funny you mention that. I used to love to travel on non interstate roads. No more - Most of them down here are torn up, over devloped rolling billboards. Just today, I was in Orange City and Enterprise, FL. On the non-interstate roads, I was greeted with one corporate big box and Chain restaurant shopping strip after another, in good old redneck Volusia County.( And I though Seminole was bad.) I had a sense of relief when I got onto an Interstate. At least you can see trees on either side of the highway and you can run without having to stop for some artificial shopping destination... I could go on, but I HATE the way development is done across this once great country."

    Me too... shyster advertising and commercialism has reached an obnoxious pitch; I despise vulture capitalism and commerce uber alles.. which is a more accurate way to describe the bullshit "free market" corporate capitalism popular with today's elites.


  8. #8
    gail
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    We drove across county from Kentucky to California in 1954, we were delighted to see areas where they were building the Interstate. It was the wave of the future, and very exciting to be part of it.

    Are there others who remember this?

    In 1960 just outside of Baltimore there was a section of the Interstate, finished, but not opened yet-- we went out on a moon-lit night about midnight and opened 'er up - we got up to 90 mph. Oh yes, the wave of the future.

    Now the Interstate highways are crumbling in many areas because the upkeep has been lousy, and the money designated for the upkeep has been squandered on every 'feel-good' program that came down the pike.

    Is it too late to save the system?

    The last across country trip I made was in 2005, from Tennessee to Nevada and much of the system is pathetic. So very pathetic that is angered me.

  9. #9
    mrblanche
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Well, I disagree about the secondary roads. Most of them are just fine, and those that ARE clogged with businesses have always been that way. One of the selling points of the interstates was that they took the traffic out of the residential and daily traffic areas, and people just got off when they needed services. But the sad story of Route 66 shows that what the interstates really did was abandon the towns that it bypassed, and build up the ones it went through.

    When I was in high school, I-30 in Arkansas was under construction, with large sections still unopened. You wouldn't know it today; it seems like there is a town at every exit.

    The same with I-10 in Louisiana. There's a section east of Baton rouge that was some of the last in the country to open, but now there's a town built up around every exit.

    I-49 in Louisiana has been opened not all that long, and when it opened, you could go over 50 miles there without seeing anything. Today every exit is developing into a town, and the traffic along old US 71 is dying.

  10. #10
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblanche
    Well, I disagree about the secondary roads. Most of them are just fine, and those that ARE clogged with businesses have always been that way. One of the selling points of the interstates was that they took the traffic out of the residential and daily traffic areas, and people just got off when they needed services. But the sad story of Route 66 shows that what the interstates really did was abandon the towns that it bypassed, and build up the ones it went through.

    When I was in high school, I-30 in Arkansas was under construction, with large sections still unopened. You wouldn't know it today; it seems like there is a town at every exit.

    The same with I-10 in Louisiana. There's a section east of Baton rouge that was some of the last in the country to open, but now there's a town built up around every exit.

    I-49 in Louisiana has been opened not all that long, and when it opened, you could go over 50 miles there without seeing anything. Today every exit is developing into a town, and the traffic along old US 71 is dying.
    My experience is kind of mixed. In areas subject to urban sprawl, secondary roads are getting completely choked with devepment, but between those areas, highways have far less traffic than formerly.

    My example is US 60 between Richmond and Newport News, VA. Inside the Richmond bypass, 60 is impossible, but once you have left there, you will be hard put to find more than two other cars within sight at the same time, until you reach the Toano/Norge/Lightfoot area near Williamsburg, where urban sprawl once again takes over. From there on in to Newport News, you are essentially driving in an urban area.

  11. #11
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblanche
    Well, I disagree about the secondary roads. Most of them are just fine, and those that ARE clogged with businesses have always been that way. One of the selling points of the interstates was that they took the traffic out of the residential and daily traffic areas, and people just got off when they needed services. But the sad story of Route 66 shows that what the interstates really did was abandon the towns that it bypassed, and build up the ones it went through.

    When I was in high school, I-30 in Arkansas was under construction, with large sections still unopened. You wouldn't know it today; it seems like there is a town at every exit.

    The same with I-10 in Louisiana. There's a section east of Baton rouge that was some of the last in the country to open, but now there's a town built up around every exit.

    I-49 in Louisiana has been opened not all that long, and when it opened, you could go over 50 miles there without seeing anything. Today every exit is developing into a town, and the traffic along old US 71 is dying.
    Funny you mention I-49. In 1989, I drove on the highway when it was half-built. Loved it. You couldn't see anything for miles. I cranked the car to 120 mph, being that there was maybe 1 car in the 50 mile stretch I was on. Most of the time, I kept my Acura at 100-110 mph.

    When I drove on it a few years later in 1992, I noticed that it was getting to be more heavily traveled, but probably nothing close to today. I bet that there is corporate sprawl everywhere. I don't blame the interstate, but rather, cheap money and vulture capitalism as Eric calls it.

    It would be interesting to drive the old US 71. Maybe its closer to sanity than I49 is going ot be in a few years.

  12. #12
    mrblanche
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Funny story about US 71. I was going down there when I was still fairly new in trucking (1977) and somehow missed a sign somewhere. The road kept getting smaller and smaller, and suddenly I ended up in someone's farmyard! Talk about a long ways to back out!

    The other oddity is that 71 goes through the Little Eva Plantation, where Harriet Beecher Stowe was inspried to write the novel Lincoln accused of starting the Civil War.

  13. #13
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Exactly.

    In Northern Virginia, both Lee Highway (Route 7) and the Dulles Toll Road provide similar examples. As recently as the 1980s, both were very lightly traveled - with minimal development once you got past the Fairfax County line (appx. 15 miles from DC). By the time we left the area in 2004, both roads were literally choked with traffic at all hours, often moving at no more than a crawl. And on either side and all around, the same endless concrete and steel diarrhea of Bed, Bath & Beyond, multiplex theaters, stack-a-prole condos and (for the more heavily indebted) McMansion subdivisions - one the same as the next, as far as the eye could see. Formerly beautiful natural landscape had been plowed under; noise and ugliness everywhere. An insane environment of benefit to no one but the vulture capitalists who enrich themselves thereby - providng lots of fast food and consumerist soporifics to keep the overweight/addled masses content with their lot. Or at least, docile and incapable of realizing the horror of their pointless lives.

  14. #14
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    Exactly.

    In Northern Virginia, both Lee Highway (Route 7) and the Dulles Toll Road provide similar examples.
    The last time I was in NoVa, I had to deliver my spouse to Dulles at about 3:00 PM on a weekday. I left Dulles, attempting to go to Charlottesville on US 29, and it took me two full hours to finally break free of the traffic jam and actually get onto 29.

    As I remember, US 1 south of Quantico is virtually untravelled any longer, except the stretch where US 17 joins it on the north side of Frederickburg and the point where 17 leaves it south of Fredericksburg. Then, until you reach the Richmond area, it again is lightly travelled.

  15. #15
    mrblanche
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Some years back, National Geographic had a story on following the whole length of US1. They did another one on US 95. Texas Highways magazine has one currently on US 80 between Mineola and Terrell, which passes about a block north of my terminal.

  16. #16
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    Re: Old Gas Stations

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    Exactly.

    In Northern Virginia, both Lee Highway (Route 7) and the Dulles Toll Road provide similar examples. As recently as the 1980s, both were very lightly traveled - with minimal development once you got past the Fairfax County line (appx. 15 miles from DC). By the time we left the area in 2004, both roads were literally choked with traffic at all hours, often moving at no more than a crawl. And on either side and all around, the same endless concrete and steel diarrhea of Bed, Bath & Beyond, multiplex theaters, stack-a-prole condos and (for the more heavily indebted) McMansion subdivisions - one the same as the next, as far as the eye could see. Formerly beautiful natural landscape had been plowed under; noise and ugliness everywhere. An insane environment of benefit to no one but the vulture capitalists who enrich themselves thereby - providng lots of fast food and consumerist soporifics to keep the overweight/addled masses content with their lot. Or at least, docile and incapable of realizing the horror of their pointless lives.
    Hold on, Eric -

    I agree 100 percent until the last words of the last sentence. That was harsh. Their lives aren't pointless, but by and large, I agree that they are plenty docile and stupid for the most part. That is why I propose taking away their voting rights. Only those with a mentality of economic nationalism and individual liberty as birthright should be allowed to vote. If that sounds contradictory, so be it. I'm sick of the contradictory public deciding my to take my freedoms away for their "safety." Many of them are haughty and at the same time, clueless on the gravity of the national situation. It's terminal, I'm afraid.

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