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Thread: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

  1. #1
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    WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    I think we gotta cook our spuds better and get to be brighter.

    I make photos quite well, but with computer enhancement. How true is that?

    this below is pic of a toy train which is rather conventional. It comes from a catologue... It's made by 'professional' people with many studio cameara resources..
    It's as good as I can do. I don't have studio nor resources.

    My only skill is to marry such images with text and writing about WW2 and trains.

    The second image is of the same engine after ten years. These engines were built from 1942 to 1944 under German bombing.
    In 1946 Britain voted-in a Labour Government. The nature of the bayonet was such, in those days, that there was a worker at each end. It shows the luxury of one trip to the South Coast 2 days in 52 weeks. A Sat-only Leeds-Bournemouth.



  2. #2
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    here is it at work

  3. #3
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Much of the atmosphere of 1940s trains is intertwined with the nature of industry and labor... to me anyway... years of sweat-shop labour. WW1 equally had a big element of labor and class war.

    With Euro war in 1914 and 1939 it is my feeling that war was made not just by alliances between Britain/France and Russia but circumstances which appear NOT to be in the US collective psyche. If they do, they are not expressed.

    My early education meant for better or worse my parents worked in very hard conditions; 60-hours normal war made hours irrelevant as they are for many women anyway. but I'm rambling now.Ignore me and I'll be happy playing with my toy trains.



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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Your romance of post-WWII rail travel in the UK was my reality.....and a very different story!

    'Luxury' it wasn't! Trains were filthy, overcrowded & unreliable - the whole railway system was physically on the verge of collapse after five years of war. Rail travel was for the most part something to be endured rather than enjoyed.

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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    'Luxury' it wasn't! Trains were filthy, overcrowded & unreliable - the whole railway system was physically on the verge of collapse after five years of war. Rail travel was for the most part something to be endured rather than enjoyed.
    Where's yer spine, lad!

    Similar wear-and-tear here in NZ also, though not as bad. We also had to carry those GIs around, and all they did was complain, and steal our wimmin.

    After the war there was great hope for working-class prosperity, then there were labour shortages, and coal shortages. British locomotives were still interesting though... and some got bright paintwork. Which woud last for a day-or-two!

    Here is a pic of a train carrying Chrurchill to Scotland for talk during the Blitz.

    In fact the train was stopped outside Willesden with signal failure with widespead bombing.. Then a Rugby the engine had bad coal and was deemed by a nutter nazi-sympathizer to require replacement, and from there the men from Crewe took over.

    Only a few German bombers made it past the Midlands, but in the darkest days, many were hit, and this pic shows a 1936-built engine worked the train through the Midlands. At Carlisle a fresh express engine took-over.

    Photo made tonight. And you expect me to drive BMW?



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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Brand
    Your romance of post-WWII rail travel in the UK was my reality.....and a very different story!

    Sorry, I didn't mean to give the impression that from 1939-on British railways were shiny and well-maintained.

    I'm all too aware of the austerity immediately after the war, the coal shortages and other worries. Many emigrated to NZ.
    The pic of the brightly coloured B1 4-6-0 LNER which started this thread represents what I judge to be the great resilience of Brtish industry... having been built in 1942 and like all locomotives in those years painted wartime black. The apple-green paint and lining was marvellous in 1946. These engines were made from more standardized parts and manufacturing dies than pre-war, with half-a-dozen heavy workshops from all the LNER. They were tough engines too, and some would say as good as or better than the Stanier Black 5 for manufacturing and running costs. Triumph vs Norton, you might say.

    They didn't do as well as Bulleid's Light Pacifics in what was termed 'secondary passenger and mixed traffic' 1948 locomotive comparison trials, but could match LMS and GWR 4-6-0s. Almost. Even if the 1951 BR Standard designs appeared to follow more Swindon-Crewe appearance, theLNER wartime principles of standardized parts and machine-tools were decades ahead of Ford's 'modular construction'. Thompson oversaw it mostly... possible Peppercorn was

    Coal and labour as you know became expensive by 1953 when the British Transport Commission determined that the future would be diesel and electric. Bloody Americans again! And huge amounts were spent on marshalling yards all based on the premis that freight was best carried by rail, not road. Another slight mis-calculation. The men who ran the railways were in 1953 still quite commonly hand-shovelling bulk coal, whether at the face, at the engine sheds, or on the engine. By 1956 trains were surpassing pre-war times and speeds were pretty good for the rather old signalling.

    You could say the post-WW2 railways of Britain were 'worn out', as they were, but that steam railway infrastructure was intact until 1963. And here were some surprisingly brave performances by engineers and train operators.

    As a kid in the 1950s and 1960s there were even in US rail magazines tables of 'the world's fastest trains'. In 1963 Burlington ran a train start-to-stop at an average scheduled 83.1 mph. Sometimes AT&SF would 'schedule' their 'Super Chief' at 82mph average for longer distances, with 6,000-approx traction hp in 4 EMD F7s... no doubt 'tuned' by friends of Dennis.

    But I knew that in 1963 the last of the well-maintained BR express engines were ill-maintained, again, and when I read of such-and-such a train averaging 95mph for long distances with a 'King' or a 'Duchess', well, I knew that there wasn't much talking on the cab... and feel justified in placing below a pic of the crew on a Paddington-Bristol train. I imagine the older man had served in WW2., and like many returnees was disinclined to cowtow to exact rules. GWR engines were right-hand-drive, so the older man was "just making time..." ... "she was in perfect nick"

    He was 'allowed' to work to retirement, and was always reliable on the tricky shifts. Worked the 'top link' for four years and requested sofer work. Died of an heart attack at 66yrs. The younger man has no known history after 1967.

    Photo Ian Allan Ltd

  7. #7
    mrblanche
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    We spent a week in London in 1986 (the week the U.S. bombed Libya, in fact). We took several day trips, such as out to Westminster, and were very impressed with their rail system. Wished we had a similar one here.

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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    You might have a similar train system to the one in the UK if the longest run for any train was 200 miles, as it is there. Most people are willing to travel by any method that gets them someplace in a few hours.

  9. #9
    mrblanche
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by pgranzeau
    You might have a similar train system to the one in the UK if the longest run for any train was 200 miles, as it is there. Most people are willing to travel by any method that gets them someplace in a few hours.
    An excellent point.

    But a lot of American travel is really short-distance like that. However, throw in the complications of needing trasnportation when you get where you're going, and the train (or even an airplane) doesn't look that viable.

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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblanche
    We spent a week in London in 1986 (the week the U.S. bombed Libya, in fact). We took several day trips, such as out to Westminster, and were very impressed with their rail system. Wished we had a similar one here.
    That was before privatisation.......

    The British railway system is fine for getting to & from London, & for commuter traffic into & out of London & a few other major cities, but the rest is something of a mess.

    We, in turn, wish we had a similar system to France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, etc., etc.

    The problem in the UK is that we have had a succession of anti-rail governments (Thatcher was one of the worst) which means the railways have been starved of investment for 50 years or more. Now we have a crazy system where the infrastructure & the rolling stock are privately owned & leased to the train operating companies. It's more expensive for the train operators to run longer trains, so overcrowding results. Train operators are measured on punctuality, but as times are only recorded at the final destination, it's not uncommon for intermediate stops to be missed if a train is running late.

  11. #11
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Brand
    Train operators are measured on punctuality, but as times are only recorded at the final destination, it's not uncommon for intermediate stops to be missed if a train is running late.
    LOL! As it should be!

    I have followed the forunes of British Railways from about 1955 to date, with a small gap between 1968 and 2005 out of respect for the demise of steam.
    I grew up in a house with half a dozen monthly magazines about railways, one from the USA and four from the UK. We had the 'Railway Magazine' in bound volumes back to 1897. By age 11 I was quite keen to 'time' trains with my wristwatch and 1/4-mileposts, and missing-out intermediate stops would have been no problem at all. To be applauded, in fact. Passengers are by-and-large something of a nuisance.

    The 1953 British Tranport Commission decision to go diesel and electric was prudent, but the technology for light rail was a bit lacking. I guess there were a lot of ingrained social structures and old railways.... Then along came Beeching... and the rise of the private car. Maybe it was easier for the Euros because they had been more heavily damaged in WW2... or maybe it was because they are Euros.. D...m foreigners!

    I blame this private ownership thing. It's American, you know....

  12. #12
    mrblanche
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    Re: WW2 Rob Toys Photos

    You see the news of a crash today of a train carrying space shuttle parts?

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