Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Arc wire spraying

  1. #1
    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The Land of The Edentulites
    Posts
    22,732

    Arc wire spraying

    This is pretty interesting -

    Pitching molten iron particles against a surface at high speed ? formally known as arc wire spraying. Daimler AG uses this thermal process for coating the contact faces of light-alloy cylinders in the engine block, thus ensuring particularly low-friction operation. This technology dispenses with cylinder liners, which are normally used to produce a resilient cylinder contact surface.

    In arc wire spraying, two live metal wires are brought into contact to produce an electrical short circuit. The intense heat thereby generated causes the ends of the wires to melt; the molten metal is atomised and sprayed by means of a gas stream. The accelerated metal particles finally form a thin coating on the cylinder contact surface.

    Daimler engineers have brought arc wire spraying to series maturity. Friction and wear in the engine can thus be considerably reduced. By dispensing with the cylinder liners, this technology not only saves space, but also cuts weight by seven to twelve percent. A further advantage is the thermal behaviour of the coating: it more readily dissipates heat in the combustion chamber, thus making cooling more efficient.


    Kinda makes a 350 small block seem, uh, quaint, eh?

  2. #2
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    3,416

    Re: Arc wire spraying

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    This is pretty interesting -

    [i]Pitching molten iron particles against a surface at high speed ? formally known as arc wire spraying. Daimler AG uses this thermal process for coating the contact faces of light-alloy cylinders in the engine block, thus ensuring particularly low-friction operation. This technology dispenses with cylinder liners, which are normally used to produce a resilient cylinder contact surface.

    In arc wire spraying, two live metal wires are brought into contact to produce an electrical short circuit. The intense heat thereby generated causes the ends of the wires to melt; the molten metal is atomised and sprayed by means of a gas stream. The accelerated metal particles finally form a thin coating on the cylinder contact surface.
    One of the problems associated with the old iron cylinder liners used to be the rapid wear rate. Ten thou' in 50,000 miles was not unusual. It looks as though Daimler's new technology has overcome the wear rate problem. I wonder though, are they using just the deposited iron or are they suplementing this with the latest ceramic & manganous phosphote coatings to reduce wear rate? Either way, anything which reduces mass has to be beneficial and the car industry could, possibly, learn much from the latest motorcycle technology.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Raleigh NC, USA
    Posts
    3,628

    Re: Arc wire spraying

    Depending on the manufacturing technology, I think this might result in a smoother surface if all the iron atoms happened to form a crystal lattice when they landed.

    Chip H.

    Former owner: 2012 Honda Civic LX, 2006 Honda Ridgeline RTL, 2000 Honda CR-V EX, 2003 MINI Cooper S, 1992 Honda Accord LX, 1999 Mercedes ML-320, 1995 VW Jetta GLX, 1991 Mercury Capri XR2, 1981 Mercury Zephyr, 1975 Chevrolet Impala

  4. #4
    Administrator Ken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    3,416

    Re: Arc wire spraying

    Quote Originally Posted by chiph
    Depending on the manufacturing technology, I think this might result in a smoother surface if all the iron atoms happened to form a crystal lattice when they landed.

    Chip H.
    I'm not sure about a lattice structure as the molten particles, I would guess are totally random in distribution, Chip. I do know that one of the advantages of the new(ish) process is that the finish is highly microporous and thus has excellent oil retaining capability. This would, of course, also be the case if your suggestion of the formation of a 'lattice' structure, as the deposition cooled, were correct. I've looked at some of the available Mercedes publicity but it doesn't (obviously) give much away other than the fact that the EAS process saves weight and has other beneficial by products such as enabling a reduction in physical engine size.

    Ken.
    Die dulci fruimini!
    Ken.
    Wolds Bikers, Lincolnshire, England.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-27-2012, 06:56 AM
  2. Drive-by-wire, drive you crazy
    By Eric in forum Technophobia
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-14-2010, 08:08 PM
  3. Drive-by-wire idiocy and Toyota
    By Eric in forum Technophobia
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-16-2010, 06:17 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •