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Thread: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

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    One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    This has to be one of the cheesiest auto commericials of all time - the "Small Chrysler" phrase shows you how much cars have shrunk over the years. This Cordoba a small Chrysler back in 1975 is a behemoth next to the a new "full-size" Chrysler 300:


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    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete
    This has to be one of the cheesiest auto commericials of all time - the "Small Chrysler" phrase shows you how much cars have shrunk over the years. This Cordoba a small Chrysler back in 1975 is a behemoth next to the a new "full-size" Chrysler 300:

    Wonderful!

    And did you notice how it see-saws back and forth when Montalban comes to a stop?

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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Good eye! The bigger cars of this vintage had that pillow type ride. Ah those were the days. Though the pillow type ride was not good on the turns and curves it had the great advantage of being able to run over a speed bump at 25 mph and the occupants did not feel a thing.

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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Yeah. Lol. I love that seesaw motion. I'm getting seasick looking at it.

    I rode in one back in 1985 when I was part of a carpool. It rode like a barge and had like a 318, I think. It was a dog.

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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete
    Good eye! The bigger cars of this vintage had that pillow type ride. Ah those were the days. Though the pillow type ride was not good on the turns and curves it had the great advantage of being able to run over a speed bump at 25 mph and the occupants did not feel a thing.
    (I know this is late but I will plead having just joined the forum )

    I learned to drive in a 1971 Chrysler 300, which was just the most enormous boat. It couldn't hold a curve for anything and it too did that seesaw/bounce thing when you stopped. (Fortunately we lived in the country where running it right off the road on a curve while learning would not get you killed.) But the advantage of it was that thirty-umph years later I feel like I can handle any curve on any road in any car.

    Dad got tired of working on the 300 every single weekend and eventually in a fit of frustration my parents traded it for a Mark I VW Rabbit, which was one of the most awesome cars of its time, and a very different experience!

    I thought I had blocked that Chrysler out of my mind, but I guess not. Thanks!

    Tina

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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials



    Back around 1979, I was dating a gal who had a '78 Caprice. I was driving a '73 Duster at the time. The Caprice was a full sized car. The Duster was a compact. It was a couple of inches longer than the Caprice when parked side by side.
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    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Tina
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete
    Good eye! The bigger cars of this vintage had that pillow type ride. Ah those were the days. Though the pillow type ride was not good on the turns and curves it had the great advantage of being able to run over a speed bump at 25 mph and the occupants did not feel a thing.
    (I know this is late but I will plead having just joined the forum )

    I learned to drive in a 1971 Chrysler 300, which was just the most enormous boat. It couldn't hold a curve for anything and it too did that seesaw/bounce thing when you stopped. (Fortunately we lived in the country where running it right off the road on a curve while learning would not get you killed.) But the advantage of it was that thirty-umph years later I feel like I can handle any curve on any road in any car.

    Dad got tired of working on the 300 every single weekend and eventually in a fit of frustration my parents traded it for a Mark I VW Rabbit, which was one of the most awesome cars of its time, and a very different experience!

    I thought I had blocked that Chrysler out of my mind, but I guess not. Thanks!

    Tina
    I completely agree with you that learning to drive an awful car at a young age can make you a much better driver. Kids today learn to drive using cars that are deceptively easy to drive. This gives them a false sense of their own skill - and ability to handle high speeds, especially in curves.

    I maintain that the ideal driver's ed vehicle is a 1970 F100 with a 390 and three on the tree!

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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric
    Quote Originally Posted by Tina
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete
    Good eye! The bigger cars of this vintage had that pillow type ride. Ah those were the days. Though the pillow type ride was not good on the turns and curves it had the great advantage of being able to run over a speed bump at 25 mph and the occupants did not feel a thing.
    (I know this is late but I will plead having just joined the forum )

    I learned to drive in a 1971 Chrysler 300, which was just the most enormous boat. It couldn't hold a curve for anything and it too did that seesaw/bounce thing when you stopped. (Fortunately we lived in the country where running it right off the road on a curve while learning would not get you killed.) But the advantage of it was that thirty-umph years later I feel like I can handle any curve on any road in any car.

    Dad got tired of working on the 300 every single weekend and eventually in a fit of frustration my parents traded it for a Mark I VW Rabbit, which was one of the most awesome cars of its time, and a very different experience!

    I thought I had blocked that Chrysler out of my mind, but I guess not. Thanks!

    Tina
    I completely agree with you that learning to drive an awful car at a young age can make you a much better driver. Kids today learn to drive using cars that are deceptively easy to drive. This gives them a false sense of their own skill - and ability to handle high speeds, especially in curves.

    I maintain that the ideal driver's ed vehicle is a 1970 F100 with a 390 and three on the tree!
    I actually *started* to learn to drive on a GMC pickup truck (I know it was a 1966 model year, but what model I could not say) with three on the tree, no power anything, and I just couldn't do it, so my parents broke down and let me drive the 300. (Some cars are *too* awful for learners.) I didn't learn to drive a stick really well until we got that Rabbit (with a 4-speed). I recognized even then that driving a stick would be a useful skill, but the clutch on the GMC was just too stiff for a skinny-legged learner to manage.

    My husband, who is approaching 50, still has no clue how to handle curves. I blame his driving instruction. This is not a problem, since we live in a fairly urban area, until we make our annual trek to Ireland where he not only has to drive on the left, but the engineering standard on rural roads there is not what I would call "superior." (Before you say "why don't you drive?" let me hasten to explain that he is even worse at reading a map. We each do what we are best at .) At least in Ireland we rent a little car; it is not like at home where he tries to bust a SUV around a curve.

    Tina

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    Senior Member J. ZIMM's Avatar
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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    ;DWhen i was learning to drive, my dad had a 1937 chevy, a one seater. This was on my grandmothers farm. I remember my dad telling me that if I put one dent on that car, he was going to put a dent on my butt! ( I was 14 at the time). Ahh, I do miss the good ol' days.

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    Vulture of The Western World Eric's Avatar
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    Re: One of the Cheesiest Auto Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by J. ZIMM
    ;DWhen i was learning to drive, my dad had a 1937 chevy, a one seater. This was on my grandmothers farm. I remember my dad telling me that if I put one dent on that car, he was going to put a dent on my butt! ( I was 14 at the time). Ahh, I do miss the good ol' days.
    Now that is a car to learn on!

    I had a chance, years ago, to drive some real antiques - including Model Ts and Model As (stock - not Hot Rods). Man.... that was an eye opener. The lost art of the double-clutch! Dealing with a non-synchronized manual transmission was, by itself, a pretty mighty challenge!

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